Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGlucose
IN THE NEWS

Glucose

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | August 31, 2006
The pain is still fresh, but Mary Ida Vandross has to find a way to face the music. A year after burying the last of her four children, the great song stylist Luther Vandross, the Philadelphia resident can hardly bear to hear recordings of her son's famed champagne tenor. "I'm getting a little adjusted to listening," she says. "Before, I just couldn't do it. It's one day at a time." She's promoting The Ultimate Luther Vandross, a posthumous best-of collection with two previously unreleased songs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Dr. Reubin Andres, a retired gerontologist who challenged commonly circulated height-weight tables for the elderly and conducted diabetes research, died of complications from heart disease Sunday at his Lake Roland-area home. He was 89. Dr. Andres believed that it was preferable to begin life lean and gradually put on weight in the middle of life. Colleagues said this position challenged the diet industry and other physicians. "He was a great problem-solver," said a friend, Dr. Jordan Tobin, the retired chief of the applied physiology section of the National Institute on Aging, who lives in Cleveland.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 1997
People with borderline diabetes often sit around hoping they'll never get the disease.Or, because of family history, they assume they'll get it no matter what they do.It's a light-switch mentality. On or off. You have it or you don't.But the American Diabetes Association's new diagnosis guidelines suggest the beginning is more like a dimmer switch. Slightly elevated but gradually increasing blood sugar levels begin damaging blood vessels long before we thought. Borderline people, with fasting glucose between 126 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl, are already in trouble.
HEALTH
By Amanda Tauber, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Amanda Tauber weighs in on type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a growing concern. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 23.6 million Americans have the disease. However, only 17.9 million Americans have been diagnosed with it at this point.
NEWS
By ASHIMA SINGAL and ASHIMA SINGAL,The Orlando Sentinel | August 27, 2006
Linda Landaverde loves beans. She eats them almost every day. But she has to count how many she eats to limit her intake of carbohydrates. Landaverde, 55, of Orlando, Fla., has type 2 diabetes, an illness she's been living with for almost eight years. Until about a month ago, she says, she managed the disease poorly. Her food choices, based on Latino tastes, weren't the most diabetic-friendly. She would eat her traditional meals and sometimes suffer from varying glucose levels as a result.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | June 22, 1993
Since 1976, the Food and Drug Administration has regulated home medical tests through its Center for Devices and Radiological Health. The following categories of tests are currently approved:* Glucose monitoring kits ($69-$169) permit diabetics to measure glucose (sugar) in their blood. The test allows them to track blood-sugar levels and adjust dietary and insulin needs. The tests are not intended to diagnose diabetes.* Pregnancy test kits ($8-$19) detect human chorionic gonadotropin in urine.
NEWS
By Joe Capista | April 11, 1999
Every diabetic knows the importance of diet in keeping blood glucose levels normal. Even the tastiest recipes, though, are doomed to grow tiresome. Then what?"
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In response to the recent letter defending smokeless tobacco use ("All tobacco products are not equally harmful," Jan. 24), the risk of tobacco trumps all others. Fifty cigarettes a day increases the risk of end-stage lung disease and lung cancer 150-fold. This is orders of magnitude worse than other modifiable risk factors like weight, aerobic capacity blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose level. Even if smokeless tobacco is responsible for only 2 percent of tobacco deaths, we cannot accept thousands of deaths instead of over 450,000 deaths a year in America.
HEALTH
By Amanda Tauber, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Amanda Tauber weighs in on type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a growing concern. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 23.6 million Americans have the disease. However, only 17.9 million Americans have been diagnosed with it at this point.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 23, 1992
CHICAGO -- University of Chicago researchers say they have discovered a gene responsible for non-insulin-dependent diabetes, the most common form of the dangerous metabolic disorder that afflicts 11 million Americans.The gene, which makes an enzyme involved in the regulation of the hormone insulin, is the first direct evidence of a cause of one of humankind's most ancient and devastating ailments."We think it's a smoking gun," said the team's leader, Dr. Graeme Bell, professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and medicine at the university's Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In response to the recent letter defending smokeless tobacco use ("All tobacco products are not equally harmful," Jan. 24), the risk of tobacco trumps all others. Fifty cigarettes a day increases the risk of end-stage lung disease and lung cancer 150-fold. This is orders of magnitude worse than other modifiable risk factors like weight, aerobic capacity blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose level. Even if smokeless tobacco is responsible for only 2 percent of tobacco deaths, we cannot accept thousands of deaths instead of over 450,000 deaths a year in America.
NEWS
February 7, 2010
Memoir writing The course will be held 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Arnold Senior Activity Center, 44 Church Road. The class will teach participants how to write an autobiography. There will also be an opportunity to learn listening and interviewing skills, writing tips and proofreading skills. Call 410-222-1922 to sign up or for more information. Spring classes Registration is taking place for classes that start April 5 at the Arnold Senior Activity Center.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | November 9, 2009
Question: : What can you tell me about the pain reliever salsalate? My doctor says that it will not only help ease my arthritis pain, but might help control my blood sugar. Diet has not controlled my borderline diabetes. Answer: : Salsalate has been used for more than a century to relieve arthritis pain. The name indicates its chemical connection with salicylic acid, which is similar to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). Like aspirin, salsalate is effective against inflammation and pain, but it does not irritate the digestive tract as aspirin does.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2008
Ray Gilbert once spent his days behind the lens of a camera, using his keen eye to capture images and turn them into photographs. But a diagnosis of diabetes in 1985 would irrevocably alter life for Gilbert, a former photographer with the Afro American newspaper in Baltimore. In 1996, after more than a decade of not "doing all I was supposed to be doing," to control his diabetes, that lack of attention caught up with the West Baltimore resident. "I was driving one night along Route 301, when all of a sudden my eyes started bleeding," recalls Gilbert, 56. "I couldn't see. By the grace of God, I was able to pull over to the side of the road safely.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | May 8, 2008
About 4 percent of pregnant women in the United States - or about 135,000 women a year - are affected by gestational diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. (Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes have not had diabetes before but have high blood sugar levels during pregnancy.) Although gestational diabetes typically goes away after a woman delivers her baby, it poses significant health risks for the baby during pregnancy, says Dr. Mary Jo Johnson, chief of obstetrics at St. Joseph Medical Center.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 27, 2008
In the hunt for better treatments for the growing and related epidemics of diabetes and obesity, researchers may have uncovered an unlikely drug: sugar. Tagatose is a natural, low-calorie sugar that has been used to sweeten such things as orange juice and candy in Europe. And, for a short time, it was used in Diet Pepsi Slurpees at 7-Eleven in the United States. But now tagatose is in a yearlong clinical trial to show that it's not just a palate pleaser but a manager for the most common form of diabetes, Type 2. If the trial goes well, it could be a big step in tagatose becoming a medicine, and eventually, an uber-sweet diet aid, according to an article in February's Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
NEWS
April 22, 1997
Thomas J. Connor, 91, the last surviving member of the FBI detail that gunned down John Dillinger in Chicago in 1934, died April 14 in Southbury, Conn.As part of the Dillinger detail, he was stationed in an alley at the side entrance to a theater and didn't witness the fatal confrontation. Dillinger, "Public Enemy No. 1," had robbed more than three dozen Midwestern banks and killed more than a dozen people.Mr. Connor resigned from the FBI in 1935 and later worked with the CIA in New York.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2006
A drug widely used to treat Type 2 diabetes delayed or prevented progression of pre-diabetes to diabetes by more than 60 percent in the largest prevention trial ever conducted, researchers reported yesterday. More than 41 million Americans have blood glucose abnormalities -- known as pre-diabetes -- that indicate that they might soon develop diabetes, making them good candidates for use of the drug, called rosiglitazone. There is no treatment but diet and exercise for preventing progression to Type 2 diabetes.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2006
The first major head-to-head study comparing the newer diabetes drug Avandia to the older medicines metformin and glyburide shows that Avandia provides better glucose control than metformin but carries more serious side effects and a higher cost, researchers said yesterday. "Metformin is still the first drug of choice" for newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes, said the study's leader, Dr. Steven E. Kahn of the University of Washington and the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Health Care System.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.