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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | October 11, 1998
Q. What is the latest scoop on glucosamine and chondroitin? My son-in-law and his mother both swear by it. He is in his mid-40s, and she in her late 70s. After her back surgery several years ago she is doing wonderfully.I am bothered with knee problems now, though my doctor says not to worry. I take Synthroid, HCTZ, Tylenol and a multivitamin. Is there any chance glucosamine could forestall the onset of arthritis? My doctor says he doesn't know and my daughter says, "Ask the Graedons."A. We're in the same boat as your doctor.
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NEWS
By JOE & TERESA GRAEDON and JOE & TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | December 22, 2008
I have enjoyed reading about home remedies on your Web site and would like to share mine. Dip a bleeding (cut, nicked, sliced or whatever) finger in ground coffee and the bleeding stops. If, after the first dip, it still shows some blood, dip it in again and bandage it. A Lebanese friend told me that it is used all the time in his home. Maybe it's the caffeine. Regardless, it has always worked for me. Thanks for surprising us with a brand-new home remedy for minor cuts. We have collected several others, including ground black pepper, cayenne pepper and ground sage.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 1998
When the Ravens take the field this fall, several of them will fortify their knees - a football player's Achilles heel - with a nutritional supplement that is supposed to help the body renew joint cartilage. The supplement, CosaminDS, is sold only through pharmacies.The same supplement, under the name Cosequin, has been used for five years by veterinarians on canine patients who suffer from arthritis or knee injuries from chasing one too many Frisbees - and by the animals' owners for osteoarthritis.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | November 10, 2008
I have an elderly dog suffering from painful arthritis in the knee and hip. Can I use the gin-soaked golden raisins with her safely? How many? She's been X-rayed, so I know it's arthritis. She hobbles around painfully. I'm already giving her a nutraceutical that has liquid glucosamine and chondroitin. Any advice on how to help her is greatly appreciated. Do NOT give your dog raisins, gin-soaked or otherwise! Although humans may benefit from this remedy, veterinarians have found that raisins and grapes are dangerous for dogs and may cause kidney problems.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | April 11, 2004
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the It drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. As far as aging boomers are concerned, the pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- does something more important than delivering a high. It may ease the pain of arthritis. What's more, it's the treatment of choice for their much-beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
NEWS
By JOE & TERESA GRAEDON and JOE & TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | December 22, 2008
I have enjoyed reading about home remedies on your Web site and would like to share mine. Dip a bleeding (cut, nicked, sliced or whatever) finger in ground coffee and the bleeding stops. If, after the first dip, it still shows some blood, dip it in again and bandage it. A Lebanese friend told me that it is used all the time in his home. Maybe it's the caffeine. Regardless, it has always worked for me. Thanks for surprising us with a brand-new home remedy for minor cuts. We have collected several others, including ground black pepper, cayenne pepper and ground sage.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 2, 2006
Americans spend an estimated $20 billion a year on dietary supplements and "natural" remedies. Many of us are blissfully - even willfully - ignorant of the medicinal value, or lack thereof, in these products. It's not entirely our fault that we buy this stuff so blindly. In 1994, Congress limited the power of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate supplements and herbal medicines, which are allowed to get - and stay - on the market unless clear evidence of harm is found. We have been left largely to our own devices to figure out which alternative remedies work, and are safe, and which are pure snake oil. Happily, a few reasonably trustworthy Web sites have sprung up enabling consumers to evaluate how much credible research there is (or isn't)
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
It's been about six years since the proverbial light bulb went off in Robert Henderson's head about a possible way to offer relief from osteoarthritis, a wrenchingly painful degenerative bone disease for which there are no curative drug treatments.Today, despite continuing skepticism from some medical professionals, the affable pharmacist has a sales phenomenon on his hands. And controversy to boot.Nutramax Laboratories Inc., the White Marsh-based nutritional supplements company Henderson founded nine years ago, is working around the clock to handle a flood of orders for the nutritional compound Henderson developed from his brainstorm.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 16, 2001
Q. Years ago my father heard that large doses of B vitamins (I don't remember which ones) would repel mosquitoes. Apparently it changed the smell of his skin, because my mother commented that he smelled so bad that she wouldn't bite him, either! A. Taking large doses of vitamin B-1 (thiamin) has long been recommended as a way to repel mosquitoes. The scientific evidence to support this practice is sparse. We heard from one European-trained physician, however, who learned this approach in medical school.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmcy.com | February 2, 2007
As a physician, I want to offer my perspective on the "sticker shock" problem in the pharmacy. I am very conscious of the fact that my patients may not be able to afford medications I prescribe. Almost all medications have alternatives, and I wish I knew which would be cheapest when I am writing the prescription. Patients with drug coverage could save a lot of time and money if they brought the list of drugs covered by their insurance to every doctor visit. We appreciate your thoughtful approach.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmcy.com | February 2, 2007
As a physician, I want to offer my perspective on the "sticker shock" problem in the pharmacy. I am very conscious of the fact that my patients may not be able to afford medications I prescribe. Almost all medications have alternatives, and I wish I knew which would be cheapest when I am writing the prescription. Patients with drug coverage could save a lot of time and money if they brought the list of drugs covered by their insurance to every doctor visit. We appreciate your thoughtful approach.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 2, 2006
Americans spend an estimated $20 billion a year on dietary supplements and "natural" remedies. Many of us are blissfully - even willfully - ignorant of the medicinal value, or lack thereof, in these products. It's not entirely our fault that we buy this stuff so blindly. In 1994, Congress limited the power of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate supplements and herbal medicines, which are allowed to get - and stay - on the market unless clear evidence of harm is found. We have been left largely to our own devices to figure out which alternative remedies work, and are safe, and which are pure snake oil. Happily, a few reasonably trustworthy Web sites have sprung up enabling consumers to evaluate how much credible research there is (or isn't)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | April 11, 2004
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the It drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. As far as aging boomers are concerned, the pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- does something more important than delivering a high. It may ease the pain of arthritis. What's more, it's the treatment of choice for their much-beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 24, 2002
Q. I have heard that some people taking glucosamine and chondroitin experience increased cholesterol. I believe I am one of them. I have been taking this combination for arthritis pain. This year when I went in for my yearly blood test, my cholesterol had gone up from 160 to 324. I could hardly believe it. I have cut back on the pain formula and am now trying to bring my cholesterol down. Could glucosamine and chondroitin be responsible? A. We have heard from many readers that their cholesterol rises when they take glucosamine and chondroitin, but there are no scientific studies to substantiate this potential side effect.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 16, 2001
Q. Years ago my father heard that large doses of B vitamins (I don't remember which ones) would repel mosquitoes. Apparently it changed the smell of his skin, because my mother commented that he smelled so bad that she wouldn't bite him, either! A. Taking large doses of vitamin B-1 (thiamin) has long been recommended as a way to repel mosquitoes. The scientific evidence to support this practice is sparse. We heard from one European-trained physician, however, who learned this approach in medical school.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 17, 2001
Q. About three years ago, I took my beagle to the veterinarian. An X-ray revealed that arthritis had affected her spine. The vet said that one single-strength glucosamine pill from the drugstore would ease her problems. After watching her run around like a puppy, I decided to try Queenie's medicine myself. I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis 15 years ago, and I have been dissatisfied with my prescriptions. Because glucosamine is a people product, I gave it a try. For eight months I have taken two double-strength glucosamine pills a day, and my stiffness and stomach pain are practically gone.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | November 10, 2008
I have an elderly dog suffering from painful arthritis in the knee and hip. Can I use the gin-soaked golden raisins with her safely? How many? She's been X-rayed, so I know it's arthritis. She hobbles around painfully. I'm already giving her a nutraceutical that has liquid glucosamine and chondroitin. Any advice on how to help her is greatly appreciated. Do NOT give your dog raisins, gin-soaked or otherwise! Although humans may benefit from this remedy, veterinarians have found that raisins and grapes are dangerous for dogs and may cause kidney problems.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 31, 1999
Q. I read a letter in your column from a person whose cholesterol had gone up dramatically after taking glucosamine. I had the same thing happen. I started using glucosamine with chondroitin four months ago for back pain and a chronically sprained ankle. I am 36. I had my cholesterol checked last week as part of a routine physical and it was 253, up from 211.Is it possible that the glucosamine "fools" the test without actually raising cholesterol? I certainly feel better taking the glucosamine, but I don't want to put myself at risk for a heart attack.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | October 11, 1998
Q. What is the latest scoop on glucosamine and chondroitin? My son-in-law and his mother both swear by it. He is in his mid-40s, and she in her late 70s. After her back surgery several years ago she is doing wonderfully.I am bothered with knee problems now, though my doctor says not to worry. I take Synthroid, HCTZ, Tylenol and a multivitamin. Is there any chance glucosamine could forestall the onset of arthritis? My doctor says he doesn't know and my daughter says, "Ask the Graedons."A. We're in the same boat as your doctor.
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