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September 27, 2014
I really appreciated Lynne Agress' article on reading and agree with her regarding the importance of reading in our children's lives ( "The gift of reading: give it to your kids," Sept. 22). We can't always have a say in what our children are taught outside the home, but we can oversee what they are putting into their minds at home, and it is vital to encourage a love of books. A lot of parents read to their toddlers and young children, but it seems like most children get busy with "growing up" and out of the habit of reading at home except for schoolwork.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Cal Ripken Jr. remembers well the pleasures of playing in Kansas City the last time the Royals were contenders - the smart, respectful fans who adored their team but would also applaud an opponent's standout catch. "Playing in Kansas City was a lot like playing in Baltimore," the Orioles great said Thursday as his former club prepared to play the Royals in the American League Championship Series. It's hard to imagine two franchises or two fan bases better equipped to understand one another's journeys.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Chef Lauren Yeagle of Mustang Alley's , an upscale bowling alley in Little Italy, is one of 54 finalists in the Next Top Product contest. Yeagle's recipe for Pickled Onion Rings have made it into second round of the contest, which is produced by US Foods, the Rosemont, Ill.-based food distributor. Voting continues through Sept. 20 on the US Foods website . The top vote getters in eight regions will compete in a head-to-head cook-off at the World Championships in Las Vegas.
NEWS
September 27, 2014
I really appreciated Lynne Agress' article on reading and agree with her regarding the importance of reading in our children's lives ( "The gift of reading: give it to your kids," Sept. 22). We can't always have a say in what our children are taught outside the home, but we can oversee what they are putting into their minds at home, and it is vital to encourage a love of books. A lot of parents read to their toddlers and young children, but it seems like most children get busy with "growing up" and out of the habit of reading at home except for schoolwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | October 20, 2011
This post comes with a caveat: the final Double Dagger show is the show of the weekend, and an important one in the Baltimore punk canon. We've done a lot on the trio recently, so consider this post more like the Weekend's Best Bet Not Happening at Ottobar Friday. (Also, apparently that show is very close to selling out .) And yes, I can hear your scoffs at New Found Glory, the pre-Fall Out Boy, pop-punk poster boys. Given my age (newly 25)
NEWS
By Photos by Amy Davis and Photos by Amy Davis,Sun photographer | April 30, 2007
Remnants of the former retail glory of a section of downtown Baltimore are still visible amid the decay that has marred the area for decades. The west-side area, dubbed the "superblock" by city planners, is poised for redevelopment. Plans include apartment towers and a mix of current small retail merchants with new chain stores. The chunk of downtown real estate is bounded by West Fayette, Howard, Lexington and Liberty streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
David Simon has repaid a long-held literary debt — with interest. On Tuesday, Penguin Classics reissues "Paths of Glory," Humphrey Cobb's surgically sharp novel of the First World War. To Simon, Cobb's 1935 rendering of a doomed French assault and its calamitous aftermath has repercussions that go beyond its immediate anti-war themes. He hears Cobb's characters every time he listens to BP executives trying to explain destructive actions taken for short-term gains. And when bureaucrats assess Hurricane Katrina with "we all did our best" cliches, they remind him of French generals rationalizing the debacles of Verdun.
NEWS
By H. C. PITTS | May 29, 1995
March 22, 1945. I must go. Believe you me my love for you all is more pronounced by the day. All of us seem to feel the same. It seems a shame that it must be fanned to its fullest flame by such as War, but War must have some advantages. All love, always Tim.My father's voice comes back from the grave in his letters to his parents during the war. We found them not long ago in a trunk in the attic. Four bundles of letters, dated on the envelopes and tied with string, were tucked under a communion dress and children's toys.
NEWS
By Madeleine Mysko | November 8, 2006
Walking early this morning, I make my usual loop through the Baltimore County Courthouse grounds. I pass the fountain with its wrought-iron fence, and arrive at the old green cannon with its perfect pyramid of cannonballs. I know that old cannon well. Once, when I was a child, my father surprised me by hoisting me up onto the barrel. Over the years, I have brought my children to the courthouse to watch the parades on the Fourth. They, too, have clambered around the cannon and smacked their hands against the cool surface of those 14 cannonballs.
FEATURES
March 24, 1991
The Easter display at Longwood Gardens on U.S. 1 in Kennett Square,Pa.,opened yesterday and continues until April 7.The walkways of the Main Conservatory are bordered with fragrant Easter Lillies and Long-stemmed bwhite calla lilies.Thousands of daffodils,pansies,roses,tulips and other spring favorites fill the spacious indoor gardens.Organ concerts are scheduled today,Saturday and next Sunday at 2:30 p.m.The concerts are included in the admission charge of $8 for adults,$2 for ages 6 to 14,free for children under 6. The gardens are open daily until 5 p.m. through March and until 6 p.m. April to October.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
If the horse racing world needed a little more evidence heading into Preakness week that the erstwhile "Sport of Kings" has turned a corner in Maryland, consider this scene on a misty Friday morning at the idyllic Fair Hill Training Center outside Elkton. Stuart Janney III, who was sitting pretty with Kentucky Derby winner Orb at this time last year, is walking the grounds with his wife, Lynn, and Hall of Fame trainer Shug McGaughey, inspecting the barn that Janney and cousin Ogden Mills Phipps purchased last August and made into a seasonal hub of their racing operation just three weeks ago. Yes, that Stuart Janney, the descendent of racing royalty who once tried to help fix Maryland racing when it seemed to be on a stretch run to ruin.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Live Arts Maryland music director J. Ernest Green conducted the Annapolis Chorale Chamber Chorus, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists last weekend in performances of works by three of the world's finest composers, filling St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis with glorious sound. Stellar music is a Green hallmark, but he also knows how to entertain and inform - as is his custom, the conductor gave audience members insight into his musical choices, exploring the common musical thread uniting the three pieces on the program: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Vesperae solennes de confessore," Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Keyboard Concerto in E-major and Anton Bruckner's Requiem in D-minor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Maybe it's because I grew up in Wisconsin watching Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers on all those snowy Sundays. But watching a great NFL game played in the snow is as good a TV experience as there is in my book. And I can't think of many NFL TV moments I've experienced that can compare with the final minutes of the Ravens 29-26 victory over the Minnesota Vikings Sunday. Five touchdowns in the last two minutes and five seconds - are you kidding? You can hardly blame Fox play-by-play announcer Chris Myers for losing track and saying there were only four touchdowns scored in that crazed, final stretch.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 12, 2013
Looking forward is generally considered a good thing; it comes highly recommended by motivational speakers and driving instructors, and it's the credo of digital-age entrepreneurs, urban planners and serial daters. But if you constantly look forward, you miss the pleasures of the periphery. Take St. Paul Street. Baltimore has a simple north-south, east-west street grid that makes commuting tolerable for the urban driver. But the grid is so good that at times, when the lights are with you, you miss things.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Chef Lauren Yeagle of Mustang Alley's , an upscale bowling alley in Little Italy, is one of 54 finalists in the Next Top Product contest. Yeagle's recipe for Pickled Onion Rings have made it into second round of the contest, which is produced by US Foods, the Rosemont, Ill.-based food distributor. Voting continues through Sept. 20 on the US Foods website . The top vote getters in eight regions will compete in a head-to-head cook-off at the World Championships in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
I know we are not supposed to be looking back at last season's Super Bowl. We are supposed to focus on the hard road back that starts this week in Denver. But go ahead on this last holiday of the summer and enjoy one last, great, TV wallow in Super Bowl glory at 9 tonight when the NFL Network presents "America's Game: 2012 Baltimore Ravens. " It's the NFL Films documentary on the champion's Super Bowl season. And like last year's Ravens, it's a winner. Beyond the stunning photography and deft editing we've come to take for granted from NFL Films, what I like best about this documentary on the journey to Super Bowl is that it does chain itself to the convention of strict chronology that such documentaries on a team's season often do. You know, Game 1, Game 2, Game 3 .... Instead of opening in pre-season camp or the kickoff of last year's first regular season contest, "America's Game" opens in the playoff game against Denver.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 27, 2002
TO REACH THE guru of flag etiquette, you go downtown to the Fallon Federal Building, which is on its usual Def-Con 4 security status, and make your way past a warren of small, ground-floor offices to the desk of Lance Sweigart. Sweigart is the Maryland service officer for the American Legion, and this morning he's decked out like Uncle Sam's advance man. Not only does he have a large flag ribbon on the lapel of his blue pin-striped suit, but he's also wearing a dazzling red-white-and-blue necktie, one of 30 he owns.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | July 16, 1995
Baltimore's Charles McElhose is passionate about duckpin bowling."I feel that that plenty of people love the game of duckpins," he said. "This game is going to be around for a long time in general and, specifically, it's going to be here at Patterson for a long time."The Patterson Bowling Center he's just acquired has been operating on Eastern Avenue, a few blocks from Patterson Park, for more than a half century. Long enough that if you wish to see bowling lanes without dots and arrows you better hurry to the East Baltimore landmark for a last look; pretty soon those unmarked lanes will be replaced with the standard updated markings.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 31, 2013
"On June 14, 1885, Bernard J. Cigrand, a 19-year-old teacher at Stony Hill School, placed a 10-inch, 38-star flag in a bottle on his desk then assigned essays on the flag and its significance," says the National Flag Day Foundation on its website. "This observance, commemorated Congresses adoption of the Stars and Stripes as the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777. This observance was also the beginning of Cigrand's long years of fervent and devoted effort to bring about national recognition and observance of Flag Day. The crowning achievement of his life came at age 50 when President [Woodrow]
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Dominic Lamolinara's journey from Arnold to Philadelphia - the site of this weekend's Final Four at Lincoln Financial Field - has gone a circuitous route, graduating from St. Mary's to spending one year at Maryland to transferring to Syracuse to emerging as the Orange's starting goalkeeper. The path has been long and meandering, but the wait has been worth it for Lamolinara, who is part of a Syracuse program that is back in the NCAA tournament semifinals for the first time since 2009.
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