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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1999
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- Steven Spielberg could be overheard telling friends it didn't really bother him, but his "Saving Private Ryan" losing out to "Shakespeare in Love" in the best picture race kept the celebration a little muted at Monday night's Dreamworks/ Paramount post-Oscar bash.The gathering at Barnaby's near Beverly Hills was far from funereal: Spielberg got to hold court with his best director Oscar, and a host of other statuettes could be seen accompanying their tuxedo-clad new owners.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1999
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- Steven Spielberg could be overheard telling friends it didn't really bother him, but his "Saving Private Ryan" losing out to "Shakespeare in Love" in the best picture race kept the celebration a little muted at Monday night's Dreamworks/ Paramount post-Oscar bash.The gathering at Barnaby's near Beverly Hills was far from funereal: Spielberg got to hold court with his best director Oscar, and a host of other statuettes could be seen accompanying their tuxedo-clad new owners.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 24, 1998
"Titanic," James Cameron's $200 million epic about the 1912 sea disaster, tied "Ben-Hur" with the most Oscars in history, winning 11 at last night's 70th annual Academy Awards ceremony.The blockbuster, which just last summer was rumored to be a flop in the making, won the Oscar for best picture as well as awards for: costumes, sound, sound effects editing, visual effects, original dramatic score, film editing, original song, cinematography, art direction and direction."Titanic's" 14 nominations had tied the record set by the 1950 film "All About Eve."
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 24, 1998
"Titanic," James Cameron's $200 million epic about the 1912 sea disaster, was well on its way to tying "Ben-Hur" for winning the most Oscars in history three-quarters of the way through the 70th annual Academy Awards ceremony last night.As the event was winding down, the blockbuster, which last summer was rumored to be a flop in the making, had won Oscars for costumes, sound, sound-effects editing, visual effects, original dramatic score, film editing, original song and art direction.But the evening's first upset was in a category "Titanic" had been presumed sure to win. Gloria Stuart, the 87-year-old actress who portrayed a survivor of the shipwreck, had been widely favored to win the Oscar for best supporting actress.
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By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
George Figgs, operator of Fells Point's late Orpheum Theater, is taking his act on the road. Tomorrow, Figgs will debut his Mobile Movie Unit - the projector, popcorn machine and other components of the old Orpheum - in Salisbury. There on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he'll re-create one of the most enjoyable movie-going experiences of yore: the drive-in. At 9 p.m., behind the Ethan Allen furniture store on Main Street, Figgs will show "American Graffiti," a film chosen to coincide with a daylong car show also scheduled for tomorrow in Salisbury.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | March 3, 2006
Talk about getting the most bang for your buck: William Hurt, onscreen for fewer than nine minutes in A History of Violence, winds up nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actor. Not that he stands a chance, right? After all, he's barely in the film, not like Jake Gyllenhaal, who's in nearly every scene of Brokeback Mountain. Or Paul Giamatti, the backbone of Cinderella Man. Or George Clooney, the tie that binds together Syriana. Or Matt Dillon, who enjoys the greatest character arc of anyone in the ensemble cast of Crash.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 19, 1997
Has anyone not heard that "Titanic" is the most expensive movie ever made? Is there a citizen at large who doesn't know of the problems that bedeviled its production, from director James Cameron's explosive temper to the PCP-laced lobster chowder? Anyone out there remember that the two studios behind "Titanic," 20th Century Fox and Paramount, almost came to blows last summer while deciding when to release the film?Well, forget it all. "Titanic," a three-hour, wide-screen historical romantic epic, steams over its advance hype, leaving the tatters of gossip columns and inside reports in its prodigious wake.
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2005
Titanic [Paramount] $30 After a steerage-class maiden voyage on DVD, the 1997 Oscar-winning blockbuster Titanic sets sail with a seaworthy "special collector's edition." The three-disc set contains enough extras to fill the time on a trans-Atlantic voyage -- or a cross-country car trip. Three commentary tracks are devoted to informative director James Cameron, an equally entertaining segment with several members of the crew -- including executive producer Jon Landau -- and cast (including stars Bill Paxton and Gloria Stuart)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 21, 1999
Kate Capshaw exudes a worn beauty in "The Love Letter," in which she plays Helen McFarquhar, an embittered bookstore owner who is given a second chance at love. Though Helen never thaws out into a character the audience can warm up to, this quirky romantic comedy has enough original characters, cozy atmosphere and plot twists to keep filmgoers interested, if not passionately engaged.After sending her daughter off to summer camp, McFarquhar happens upon an anonymous letter squeezed into the cushions of a couch in her shop.
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