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Gloria Steinem

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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 1995
"The Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem," by Carolyn G. Heilbrun. New York: Dial Press: 451 pages. $24.95 Don't be misled. Critic and former Columbia professor Carolyn Heilbrun, author of "Writing a Woman's Life," has written not a biography of Gloria Steinem, icon of the women's movement, but a valentine. Exalting Ms. Steinem as "the epitome of female beauty and the quintessence of female revolution," Ms. Heilbrun devotes most of this overlong book to attacking Ms. Steinem's critics from the Redstockings to Betty Friedan, who is denigrated mercilessly and accused of jealousy of Ms. Steinem's looks.
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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Sally Ride had the coolest name. Perfect for the first American woman in space. On that day in 1983 when she shattered the ultimate glass ceiling aboard the shuttle Challenger, many in the crowd of a quarter-million people watching the launch — a group that included feminist icons Jane Fonda and Gloria Steinem — were wearing T-shirts that read "Ride, Sally, Ride. " Her journey was the ultimate cover for Wilson Pickett's rock 'n' roll lyrics. Dr. Ride, who died Monday at 61 in La Jolla, Calif., after a very private battle with pancreatic cancer, was cool, too. She was chosen for the shuttle crew by NASA administrator Chris Kraft because he thought she could handle the pressure.
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By Cassandra Spratling and Cassandra Spratling,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 6, 1998
"Betty Shabazz," edited by Jamie Foster Brown. Simon & Schuster. 160 pages. $23.Before her death in a tragic fire, Betty Shabazz was besknown as the widow of Malcolm X and the woman who went on earn a Ph.D. and become a college administrator while raising their six daughters and traveling around the world keeping Malcolm's name and mission alive.In "Betty Shabazz," a marvelous collection of 40 essays, readers can learn more about this inspiring woman, mentor and friend to everyone from Maya Angelou and Queen Latifah to former NAACP chair Myrlie Evers-Williams and Gloria Steinem.
NEWS
By Frederick Lynch and Frederick Lynch,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2007
The title of Tom Brokaw's new book "Boom! Voices of the Sixties" suggests another "generations" book, an account of baby boomers creating the 1960s and vice versa. But it isn't -- not exactly. For Brokaw, "Boom!" refers not to boomers but rather to explosive differences before and after the decade's "volcanic center" of 1968. As for boomers, if one adheres to the standard demographic definition as the generation born from 1946 through 1962, then perhaps half the people whose voices are invoked here are boomers' older brothers and sisters, such as Pat Buchanan (69 years old)
NEWS
January 11, 1991
The statistics are getting personal: When breast cancer strikes one in 10 American women, virtually everyone knows someone who has been affected by the disease. Breast cancer survival rates are rising, but so is the number of cases. Why this epidemic? Scientists aren't sure, and at current funding levels for research many more thousands of people will die before they can offer answers.Yet a number of factors are converging to call more attention to the breast cancer epidemic. Increasing numbers of well-known women -- from Nancy Reagan to Gloria Steinem -- are speaking out about their own experience with the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | December 20, 2001
Just announced Diana Krall will perform April 9 at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Tickets go on sale today. Call 410-783-8000. Comedian Kevin Pollak is the inaugural act at the Baltimore Improv. He performs Dec. 28-31. Lewis Black performs there Jan. 3-6. Tickets are available at the box office, 34 Market Place. Call 410-727-8500. Alicia Keys will perform Jan. 23 at Constitution Hall in Washington. Comedian Martin Lawrence performs there Jan. 25-26. Call 410-481-SEAT. Travis Tritt will perform at George Mason University's Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., Jan. 26. Aaron Carter plays there Jan. 30 and Kenny Rogers Feb. 15. Call 410-481-SEAT.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | May 24, 1992
Not too long ago a man I know -- and like -- said to me: "I'll bet you must have been pretty when you were younger." Then he paused, as though waiting for a reply.Reply? What was I supposed to say -- "Thank you very much?" But it didn't matter because before I could answer, the man moved on to another subject. Politics or the weather or maybe it was baseball -- I really don't remember.I don't remember because I had not moved on. I was still hearing the words, "I'll bet you must have been pretty when you were younger."
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 6, 1992
Of the many things we know -- or think we know -- about Gloria Steinem, some items instantly leap to mind. For instance:The image of a slim, youthful-looking woman who confidently marked her 40th birthday by telling admiring photographers, "This is what 40 looks like."The image of a sexy, glamorous woman who never lacked for male companionship but chose, ultimately, to remain single, saying "A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle."The image of the hard-working, outer- directed feminist -- an activist always on-the-go who maintained that "the examined life is not worth living."
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | July 8, 1992
WHEN she wrote about a Supreme Court decision on the liability of tobacco companies, New York Times reporter Linda Greenhouse included a paragraph, part human interest, part factoid, explaining which of the justices smoked.She was in no position to do something along the same lines last week when the court handed down its decision on abortion. There was no obvious way of telling if anyone on the court had family or friends who had once ended a pregnancy.That is because abortion is considered a most private act. Many women have never told their parents, their children, or even their friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Rakoff and By David Rakoff,Special to the Sun | June 16, 2002
A Big Life in Advertising, by Mary Wells Lawrence. Alfred A. Knopf. 307 pages. $26. "I was working at McCann Erickson for the money, for little black dance dresses that showed off my Norwegian legs, for my baby daughters' smocked dresses from Saks and for an apartment larger than I could afford ..." It should come as no surprise that Mary Wells Lawrence's memoir, A Big Life in Advertising, has a marvelous first line. After all, as founder and CEO of Wells Rich Greene, the influential Madison Avenue firm responsible for such canonical campaigns as Alka-Seltzer's "plop, plop, fizz, fizz," among many others, Lawrence knows a thing or two about hooking one's interest right out of the gate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Stossel and Scott Stossel,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Among the many rareified accomplishments to which the cartoonist Garry Trudeau can lay claim -- a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, a cartoon strip that runs in more than 1,400 newspapers, a 20-year marriage to Jane Pauley -- perhaps the most revealing is this one: Trudeau is surely the only person to have had one of his books prefaced with an essay by the arch-conservative William F. Buckley Jr. (Doonesbury's Greatest Hits: A Mid-Seventies Revue, Holt,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Rakoff and By David Rakoff,Special to the Sun | June 16, 2002
A Big Life in Advertising, by Mary Wells Lawrence. Alfred A. Knopf. 307 pages. $26. "I was working at McCann Erickson for the money, for little black dance dresses that showed off my Norwegian legs, for my baby daughters' smocked dresses from Saks and for an apartment larger than I could afford ..." It should come as no surprise that Mary Wells Lawrence's memoir, A Big Life in Advertising, has a marvelous first line. After all, as founder and CEO of Wells Rich Greene, the influential Madison Avenue firm responsible for such canonical campaigns as Alka-Seltzer's "plop, plop, fizz, fizz," among many others, Lawrence knows a thing or two about hooking one's interest right out of the gate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | December 20, 2001
Just announced Diana Krall will perform April 9 at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Tickets go on sale today. Call 410-783-8000. Comedian Kevin Pollak is the inaugural act at the Baltimore Improv. He performs Dec. 28-31. Lewis Black performs there Jan. 3-6. Tickets are available at the box office, 34 Market Place. Call 410-727-8500. Alicia Keys will perform Jan. 23 at Constitution Hall in Washington. Comedian Martin Lawrence performs there Jan. 25-26. Call 410-481-SEAT. Travis Tritt will perform at George Mason University's Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., Jan. 26. Aaron Carter plays there Jan. 30 and Kenny Rogers Feb. 15. Call 410-481-SEAT.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
In the annals of celebrity weddings, 2000 certainly had some shockers. The young Welsh beauty Catherine Zeta-Jones, who could have almost anyone she chose, hunkered down with Michael Douglas. Hollywood glamour boy Brad Pitt exchanged rings with Jennifer Aniston. And then there was the famously unmarried Gloria Steinem -- who spent decades saying marriage turned a woman into a "semi-non-person" -- who wedded South African political activist David Bale. After years of dropping marriage rates in America, commitment, it appears, could be making a comeback -- or, at least, could be on the new list of "in" things to do, according to pop culture.
FEATURES
By Cassandra Spratling and Cassandra Spratling,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 6, 1998
"Betty Shabazz," edited by Jamie Foster Brown. Simon & Schuster. 160 pages. $23.Before her death in a tragic fire, Betty Shabazz was besknown as the widow of Malcolm X and the woman who went on earn a Ph.D. and become a college administrator while raising their six daughters and traveling around the world keeping Malcolm's name and mission alive.In "Betty Shabazz," a marvelous collection of 40 essays, readers can learn more about this inspiring woman, mentor and friend to everyone from Maya Angelou and Queen Latifah to former NAACP chair Myrlie Evers-Williams and Gloria Steinem.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
CRISTINA PAGE had been incubating the idea for a few years, almost since her graduation from Goucher College in 1993: Why not produce a college guidebook in which students or recent graduates tell those coming close behind about real life in real schools -- warts and all?Current students and recent graduates should know best, and as Gloria Steinem (for whom Page was briefly an assistant at Ms. magazine) used to sign off her letters, "Each other's lives are our best textbooks."Page, 26, sold the idea to a publisher.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
"Gloria Steinem: Her Passions, Politics, and Mystique," by Sydney Ladensohn Stern. Birch Lane Press 288 pages. $24.95.This is Sydney Ladensohn Stern's first foray into the biography genre. Readers can only hope it will be her last. Kindly put, Stern has not mastered the art. If Steinem were dead, she'd be spinning in her grave; still living, she may never be able to leave her apartment again. This book embarrasses both author and subject.How bad is it? Poorly researched, execrably written, badly organized, facilely argued -- - it's difficult to pinpoint the worst flaw.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Even though it was well past midnight, and Pearl Jam had just completed an exhausting, exhilarating 13-song set, the band wasn't quite ready to call it a night. "As long as you all are here, we might as well stick around a few minutes," singer Eddie Vedder told the crowd at D.A.R. Constitution Hall Saturday night. "We don't get together like this very often."Indeed, not. Apart from the fact that Pearl Jam is way too popular to make a habit of playing 3,000-seat halls, the shows at Constitution Hall -- the band played Saturday and Sunday nights -- weren't just ordinary concerts.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
"Gloria Steinem: Her Passions, Politics, and Mystique," by Sydney Ladensohn Stern. Birch Lane Press 288 pages. $24.95.This is Sydney Ladensohn Stern's first foray into the biography genre. Readers can only hope it will be her last. Kindly put, Stern has not mastered the art. If Steinem were dead, she'd be spinning in her grave; still living, she may never be able to leave her apartment again. This book embarrasses both author and subject.How bad is it? Poorly researched, execrably written, badly organized, facilely argued -- - it's difficult to pinpoint the worst flaw.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 1995
"The Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem," by Carolyn G. Heilbrun. New York: Dial Press: 451 pages. $24.95 Don't be misled. Critic and former Columbia professor Carolyn Heilbrun, author of "Writing a Woman's Life," has written not a biography of Gloria Steinem, icon of the women's movement, but a valentine. Exalting Ms. Steinem as "the epitome of female beauty and the quintessence of female revolution," Ms. Heilbrun devotes most of this overlong book to attacking Ms. Steinem's critics from the Redstockings to Betty Friedan, who is denigrated mercilessly and accused of jealousy of Ms. Steinem's looks.
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