Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGlobe Theatre
IN THE NEWS

Globe Theatre

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 27, 2001
LONDON - It rises up on the south bank of the Thames River like a bold anachronism, from its oak and lime-plaster walls to its thatched roof. No one knows exactly what Shakespeare's Globe Theatre looked like. The original burned down in 1613 when a spark from a cannon used in a performance ignited the thatch. Rebuilt the same year, the theater was closed by the Puritans in 1642 and torn down two years later. Evidence about the Globe's appearance is sparse - several sketchy maps, some fragments from an archaeological dig and, of course, the line in the prologue to Shakespeare's Henry V referring to the theater as "this wooden O."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 14, 2013
If you thought your family was dysfunctional, wait until you meet the Pecks in Venus Theatre's new production, "Grieving for Genevieve. " Set in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, the play revolves around three sisters and their mother, who come together for the middle sister's wedding. The bride-to-be, Delilah, is getting married for the third time. Played by Ty Hallmark, who studied at the Studio Theatre in Washington and the Globe Theatre in London, Delilah is not your girl next door.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Elspeth M. Udvarhelyi, who had held important development roles with several Baltimore and Washington artistic and cultural organizations, and had been development director and interim CEO of the Globe Theatre in London, died Sunday of Merkel cell cancer, a rare skin disease, at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Roland Park Place resident was 79. Elspeth Mary Campbell, the daughter of a sheep farmer, was born in Dornoch, Scotland, and raised in Bonar Bridge, Scotland. She was a graduate of a private high school in Inverness, where she developed her lifelong interest in music, art and theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, best known for its summer productions outdoors on the hilltop grounds of the 19th-century Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, has purchased a historic site for its second home — the 1885 Mercantile Trust & Deposit Co. building in downtown Baltimore. That distinctive red building, currently the home of the Club Dubai, was purchased for the nonprofit theater company's use by the Helm Foundation at a price of $1.25 million, the first step in a project with an estimated total cost of about $6 million.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 20, 2001
While attending a musical on London's West End last week, an American friend who has lived in London for two decades turned to me and said, "Now I know why it was so important for Britain to keep the theaters open during the Blitz." The show-must-go-on tradition is about a lot more than mere perseverance. It's about the resilience of the human spirit and the importance of community, and it harks back to theater's ancient roots in religion. I gained a new appreciation for this tradition on Sept.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Excalibur' on stage The Ballet Theatre of Maryland will present Excalibur tomorrow and Sunday at the Maryland Renaissance Festival, 1821 Crownsville Road. Performances will be held at 4:30 p.m. at the Globe Theatre on the fairgrounds. Excerpts from Excalibur, the tale of King Arthur's famed sword and the era of the Knights of the Round Table, will be performed. 410-263-8289.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
The Roaring Twenties rise from the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park tonight in a modern performance of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. The comedy tells a story about love and magic in Athens, Greece, with an American twist and bit of 1920s setting, selected by director Ian Gallanar. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company hosts its third Shakespeare in the Ruins at the site of the stabilized ruins in Ellicott City's historic district. The open-air, black thrust stage is shadowed by treetops, large pillars and a granite Greek Revival facade of the picturesque ruins of the former 19th-century school for girls, a site for concerts, plays and weddings throughout the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, best known for its summer productions outdoors on the hilltop grounds of the 19th-century Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, has purchased a historic site for its second home — the 1885 Mercantile Trust & Deposit Co. building in downtown Baltimore. That distinctive red building, currently the home of the Club Dubai, was purchased for the nonprofit theater company's use by the Helm Foundation at a price of $1.25 million, the first step in a project with an estimated total cost of about $6 million.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 14, 2013
If you thought your family was dysfunctional, wait until you meet the Pecks in Venus Theatre's new production, "Grieving for Genevieve. " Set in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, the play revolves around three sisters and their mother, who come together for the middle sister's wedding. The bride-to-be, Delilah, is getting married for the third time. Played by Ty Hallmark, who studied at the Studio Theatre in Washington and the Globe Theatre in London, Delilah is not your girl next door.
TRAVEL
By SARAH CLAYTON and SARAH CLAYTON,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them into shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. -- A Midsummer Night's Dream The Blackfriars Playhouse, William Shakespeare's other theater, opened in Staunton, Va., last month after closing almost 400 years ago in London. The arrival of the playhouse, a replica of one of the earliest theaters in the English-speaking world, is the centerpiece of a building and restoration program that may well put this historic town of 24,000 on the map for tourists and theater enthusiasts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Elspeth M. Udvarhelyi, who had held important development roles with several Baltimore and Washington artistic and cultural organizations, and had been development director and interim CEO of the Globe Theatre in London, died Sunday of Merkel cell cancer, a rare skin disease, at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Roland Park Place resident was 79. Elspeth Mary Campbell, the daughter of a sheep farmer, was born in Dornoch, Scotland, and raised in Bonar Bridge, Scotland. She was a graduate of a private high school in Inverness, where she developed her lifelong interest in music, art and theater.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Excalibur' on stage The Ballet Theatre of Maryland will present Excalibur tomorrow and Sunday at the Maryland Renaissance Festival, 1821 Crownsville Road. Performances will be held at 4:30 p.m. at the Globe Theatre on the fairgrounds. Excerpts from Excalibur, the tale of King Arthur's famed sword and the era of the Knights of the Round Table, will be performed. 410-263-8289.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
The Roaring Twenties rise from the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park tonight in a modern performance of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. The comedy tells a story about love and magic in Athens, Greece, with an American twist and bit of 1920s setting, selected by director Ian Gallanar. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company hosts its third Shakespeare in the Ruins at the site of the stabilized ruins in Ellicott City's historic district. The open-air, black thrust stage is shadowed by treetops, large pillars and a granite Greek Revival facade of the picturesque ruins of the former 19th-century school for girls, a site for concerts, plays and weddings throughout the year.
TRAVEL
By SARAH CLAYTON and SARAH CLAYTON,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them into shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. -- A Midsummer Night's Dream The Blackfriars Playhouse, William Shakespeare's other theater, opened in Staunton, Va., last month after closing almost 400 years ago in London. The arrival of the playhouse, a replica of one of the earliest theaters in the English-speaking world, is the centerpiece of a building and restoration program that may well put this historic town of 24,000 on the map for tourists and theater enthusiasts.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 27, 2001
LONDON - It rises up on the south bank of the Thames River like a bold anachronism, from its oak and lime-plaster walls to its thatched roof. No one knows exactly what Shakespeare's Globe Theatre looked like. The original burned down in 1613 when a spark from a cannon used in a performance ignited the thatch. Rebuilt the same year, the theater was closed by the Puritans in 1642 and torn down two years later. Evidence about the Globe's appearance is sparse - several sketchy maps, some fragments from an archaeological dig and, of course, the line in the prologue to Shakespeare's Henry V referring to the theater as "this wooden O."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 20, 2001
While attending a musical on London's West End last week, an American friend who has lived in London for two decades turned to me and said, "Now I know why it was so important for Britain to keep the theaters open during the Blitz." The show-must-go-on tradition is about a lot more than mere perseverance. It's about the resilience of the human spirit and the importance of community, and it harks back to theater's ancient roots in religion. I gained a new appreciation for this tradition on Sept.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2000
BERLIN - More than two years after Paramount Pictures turned historic Berlin into the fictional village of Hale for the movie "Runaway Bride," the town continues to reap tourism benefits. "A day doesn't go by without someone coming in and asking about the movie," said Fran Murray, owner of Sassafras Station, an antiques, garden and gift shop. "If they didn't know it was filmed here, they do as soon as they get to town." And those people who come to Berlin, population 3,300, to see where the Julia Roberts-Richard Gere movie was filmed, typically spend money.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm | June 24, 1998
THEY aren't dancing in the streets, but something's sparkling in London this summer. They say it's "Swinging London" again, as it was in the 1960s when the Beatles were all the rage.On a recent visit, this American found London a dramatically different place than it was 10 years ago when I lived there.Wherever I went, from the Houses of Parliament to the Chelsea Flower Show to the new Globe Theatre, never had I seen England in such a merry mood.I first noticed the change during a taxi ride from the airport.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.