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By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 16, 1993
Boston's winter of 1948 was bitterly cold. Slugger Ted Williams went south to fish. On Jan. 28, while Ted was fishing in Florida, Doris Williams gave birth to a daughter, Barbara Joyce Williams. The baby was early. Ted was late.The Globe's Harold Kaese wrote, "Everyone knows where Moses was when the lights went out. And apparently everybody knows where Ted Williams was when his baby was born Tuesday. He was fishing."In his biography, "My Turn at Bat," Williams wrote, "Well, Bobby Jo was the most important thing in my life from the moment she was born . . . but I sure wasn't going to apologize for something that didn't concern anybody but Doris and me."
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NEWS
By Marc B. Terrill | September 22, 2014
Jews around the globe will gather in synagogues Wednesday to mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. There is a change in the air as fall approaches; schools are back in session, temperatures begin to drop and there is a general atmosphere of renewal. Jewish tradition encourages us to gather together, reflect on the year that has passed and pray for peace and sustenance in the coming year. The collective strength and spirit felt during this time of year typically energizes all to look ahead with optimism.
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FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1994
London -- A soft, wet breeze blows in from the Thames River as the master thatcher lays the Norfolk reed for the first thatched roof built in London for three centuries."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For the past 12 years, the name Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has been most associated with its outdoor productions in summer and fall, reached by trekking up a hill to the rustic ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. Audience seating typically involved folding chairs or blankets. This week, the company inaugurates a striking new home in downtown Baltimore that suggests a hip version of the famed Globe Theatre in London where Shakespeare's own company performed.
NEWS
June 12, 1993
The sale of the Boston Globe to the New York Times has a familiar ring to Marylanders. Much the same thing, for much the same reasons, occurred here when The Sun and The Evening Sun were bought by the Times Mirror Co. in 1986. There aren't many independently owned major daily newspapers left in this country controlled by a family or two with a long tradition of publishing -- the Providence Journal-Bulletin and the Dallas Morning News are examples that come to mind. The New York Times is the family-controlled centerpiece of a publishing empire, as is the Los Angeles Times, flagship of Times Mirror.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 26, 1991
In the beginning, there was the Encyclopaedia Britannica. And Jim McKay had it with him wherever he went, from Bridgeport to "A Bridge Too Far.""It was a savior during those early days of 'Wide World of Sports;' you'd be amazed what good, concise articles it has on just about every game known to man," said McKay, on the occasion of the show's 30th anniversary special on ABC Sunday (4:30 p.m.)What an adventure it has been the last three decades, not only for the veteran anchor of the program, but for viewers who grew up enjoying the full spectrum of sports, often presented in travelogue fashion.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | August 8, 1998
BOSTON -- Two days after the Boston Globe asked for Mike Barnicle's resignation, the fate of the popular, 25-year Metro columnist apparently remained unresolved after a meeting he had with top Globe officials yesterday.DTC After an hourlong off-site session with Barnicle, Globe publisher Benjamin B. Taylor and Assistant to the Publisher Alfred S. Larkin Jr. issued a short statement saying, "We consider it a private meeting between the parties, and have no further comment on it at this time."
BUSINESS
By Newsday | June 1, 1993
Is the Boston Globe about to become the New England Times?According to the latest issue of Time magazine, the New York Times has spent the past few months in serious talks to buy the Globe and is on the verge of striking a deal to spend as much as $1 billion for the 121-year-old newspaper.Representatives of both papers declined to comment. But reports had surfaced recently that the Globe was for sale and that the prospective buyer would be a family-owned publishing company."The industry is often called 'The Club.
NEWS
October 15, 1998
KENNETH Jernigan, who died this week at 71, was a visionary. Blind at birth, he helped sighted people to see it is wrong and irrational to discriminate against the blind."
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1997
Finally, they had liftoff.After four months of delays, a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket roared upward from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on May 5, carrying five commercial satellites and dreams of a new era in communications.The 1,500-pound satellites are the first of 66 scheduled to be flung into orbit to create a man-made constellation called the Iridium satellite network. Its ambitious goal: to make wireless telephone calls available from any spot on the globe with a small, hand-held phone.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Tim and Julie Rivenbark had a house, two kids and jobs they loved. But the Howard County couple also had a yearning for more experiences and fewer things. "We were doing what we thought was the American dream," says Tim Rivenbark. It took a couple of years for the sensible, responsible Rivenbarks to throw caution to the wind and make the decision to leave behind the familiar and embark on an adventurous yearlong quest to see the world. Over the past several weeks, the couple sold their house and cars.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
While most of the continental United States shivered amid the "polar vortex" last month, globally, it was the fourth-warmest January on record and warmest since 2007. The average temperature was 1.17 degrees above the 20th century average of 53.6 degrees, according to the National Climatic Data Center's State of the Climate report. The average temperature just over land was 2.11 degrees above average, at 37 degrees. While cold temperatures dominated the eastern U.S., the warmest temperature anomalies occurred in Alaska, Greenland and eastern China and Russia, according to the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014
Though it came into Sunday's Golden Globes awards as the leading TV series with four nominations, the Baltimore-shot series "House of Cards" quickly buckled under the weight of "Breaking Bad. " But star Robin Wright snapped up the best drama actress for her work as the scheming Claire Underwood. It was a banner weekend for Wright, who also just got engaged to actor Ben Foster. The Netflix production and cast members Kevin Spacey and Corey Stoll lost in their contests for best drama series (to "Breaking Bad")
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Baltimore-made "Veep" and "House of Cards," and stars Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Kevin Spacey came up big in Golden Globe nominations announced Thursday. Dreyfus was nominated as best actress both in film and TV comedy by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. The film nomination came for her work in "Enough Said," while the TV nod was for "Veep," the HBO political satire that features Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer, "House of Cards," the Netflix political thriller, picked up four major nominations.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
To prepare for Saturday's football game between Maryland and Boston College, we traded emails with Michael Vega, who covers the Eagles for the Boston Globe. You can check out more of Michael's coverage on their website . TRACKING THE TERPS: For an outsider looking in, the Eagles seem like a different team under Steve Addazio. Is that a fair assessment, and what specifically has he done to lead Boston College out of its dry spell MICHAEL VEGA: The difference has been night and day under Steve Addazio.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
March 2013 brought a chill to Maryland and much of the eastern U.S., but the global average temperature for the month was meanwhile 10th warmest on record, according to U.S. climate researchers. Around here, March temperatures were about 3 degrees below normal, as measured at BWI Marshall Airport. The average of 40.6 degrees at the airport in March was two degrees colder than the average for December, of 42.7 degrees. The trend carried across much of the Southeast. For states from Mississippi to Virginia to Florida, it was among the top 10 coldest months of March in 119 years, according to the National Climatic Data Center . The national March temperature average of 40.8 degrees was 0.9 degrees below the 20th century average.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service Newsday and the Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | June 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- The Boston Globe, one of the few large U.S. newspapers that remain under family control, would be sold to the New York Times Co. under a $1.1 billion merger agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies.The deal provides that the Globe would retain its management and editorial autonomy. Yet it adds to the decades-long centralization of U.S. communications, under which many independently owned news organizations have been sold or closed down. It would also considerably expand the role of the Times Co. and its controlling family, the Sulzbergers, in the country's media.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2005
Albatrosses can fly more than 25,000 miles in the 18 months between their breeding seasons, sometimes making nearly nonstop trips around the southern half of the globe, according to a new study. The large and graceful seabirds breed on islands north of Antarctica, but little was known previously about where they went during the off season. Researchers used long-lived electronic leg monitors to track 22 gray-headed albatrosses. They found that 12 of the birds circled the globe at a latitude just south of the southern tips of South America and Africa.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
A recently published study led by U.S. government climate researchers predicts warming global temperatures will mean more moisture in the air, and thus heavier precipitation extremes. The research, reported in the peer-reviewed academic journal Geophysical Research Letters, called the conclusions " the most scientifically sound projection. " "Climate model simulations indicate a substantial future increase in mean and maximum water vapor concentrations," they wrote in the abstract of the study . For the northern hemisphere, that could mean a 20-30 percent increase in a statistic known as "maximum possible precipitation" over the next century under current greenhouse gas emissions growth rates.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013
Justin Timberlake has released a small slice of his next album, "The 20/20 Experience," causing the New York Times to spin in circles spouting wardrobe puns. Also catching the Internet's eye over the weekend and this morning: Free speech advocate Aaron Swartz committed suicide after what friends and relatives say was a devastating smear campaign, the Ravens will be playing the Patriots for a conference championship, Quentin Tarantino is not afraid of controversy and there are shiny new things in Detroit.
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