Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGlobal Health
IN THE NEWS

Global Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Brooks Puchner and Tyler Brown | May 21, 2013
Remember the last time you got a B in a class? Maybe a B was OK, a hard-earned accomplishment in a difficult, GPA-sinking course. Or perhaps a B just wasn't good enough - a subpar finish that left you mentally shaking a fist at other classmates. The grades are in for the Johns Hopkins University. Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM), an international student-run health advocacy group, recently released the first-ever University Global Health Impact Report Card. The report card ranked the top 54 North American research universities on their overall contributions to global health.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Johns Hopkins is more than halfway to its $4.5 billion fundraising goal, the university announced Wednesday, with the money helping to support initiatives that include urban revitalization and global health. More than 162,000 donors have helped Hopkins meet the halfway mark earlier than officials had previously expected, in spring 2014. The $4.5 billion fundraising goal is among the biggest such efforts in the country and the largest for the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Hospital.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 28, 2005
A six-part series on global health issues (MPT, Tuesday-Thursday, 9 p.m.)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Hundreds of thousands of people die of malaria every year, most of them in Africa. Dr. Eddy C. Agbo wants people to get diagnosed quickly and easily - right in their homes - so they can seek treatment. The barrier to quick and easy diagnoses is that all available tests require blood. His Baltimore company is readying a version that uses urine - just like a pregnancy test. It should hit the market next year. Agbo, chief executive of Fyodor Biotechnologies, grew up in Nigeria and envisions the malaria test as the first in a line of products that could make an impact in developing countries.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2006
The Johns Hopkins University is starting an organization to help coordinate efforts to fight global health threats such as AIDS, malaria, avian flu and heart disease. Known as the Center for Global Health, it will integrate work done by three existing Hopkins institutions -- the medical school, the nursing school and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. "The three schools are working together on a project that has real impact," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
NEWS
By Carole Mitnick | April 3, 2009
China has called an urgent meeting that could affect your life, and it's not about the global economic crisis - or global warming. Instead, it's about a quiet global health threat that is more disturbing than you probably assume: the silent spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) around the world. Many global health leaders are in Beijing this week trying to draw attention to the danger, including Bill Gates, whose foundation has given billions of dollars to fight diseases; Margaret Chan, the director-general of the World Health Organization; and senior representatives from more than two dozen nations, including the United States.
NEWS
By Tyler Brown, Kaci Hickox, Mike Rogers and Jane Andrews | October 14, 2010
Worldwide, 10 million people die each year because they cannot access medicines for treatable diseases. While Johns Hopkins University is a world-renowned research institution and a leading force in promoting global health, students remain deeply troubled that our university has not committed to making the medicines it helps discover available and affordable to the world's poor. Last week, in an interview with WYPR's Dan Rodricks, Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels heralded the university's contributions to improving health throughout the developing world.
NEWS
March 18, 1994
How critical is the shortage of nursing home beds in Anne Arundel County? So critical that people have been forced to leave their elderly loved ones in an institution that lets patients sit in their own excrement for hours, doesn't administer medicine properly and ignores infections until a patient contracts gangrene.These are just a few of the violations found by state health officials at the 200-bed Wellspring Nursing Center in Glen Burnie; last November, the center was fined $50,000 for "an ongoing pattern of serious or life-threatening deficiencies."
NEWS
April 1, 2013
As op-ed commentator Richard E. Chaisson wrote recently, "despite the devastation that TB wreaks, it still is not a global health priority" ("Tuberculosis, the forgotten killer," March 24). Just as it was necessary to eradicate smallpox and combat polio in order to protect ourselves, we also need to step up global efforts to control tuberculosis. That's because any TB case is one sneeze away from spreading to someone else, and in the jet age that puts us all at risk. Until recently, it took five or six weeks to determine if a TB case was drug resistant.
NEWS
By Brooks Puchner and Tyler Brown | May 21, 2013
Remember the last time you got a B in a class? Maybe a B was OK, a hard-earned accomplishment in a difficult, GPA-sinking course. Or perhaps a B just wasn't good enough - a subpar finish that left you mentally shaking a fist at other classmates. The grades are in for the Johns Hopkins University. Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM), an international student-run health advocacy group, recently released the first-ever University Global Health Impact Report Card. The report card ranked the top 54 North American research universities on their overall contributions to global health.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
As op-ed commentator Richard E. Chaisson wrote recently, "despite the devastation that TB wreaks, it still is not a global health priority" ("Tuberculosis, the forgotten killer," March 24). Just as it was necessary to eradicate smallpox and combat polio in order to protect ourselves, we also need to step up global efforts to control tuberculosis. That's because any TB case is one sneeze away from spreading to someone else, and in the jet age that puts us all at risk. Until recently, it took five or six weeks to determine if a TB case was drug resistant.
NEWS
By Lynn R. Goldman and Michael J. Klag | January 7, 2013
The news that the Central Intelligence Agency had been running a fake vaccination program in Pakistan first surfaced in 2011 and quickly ignited fears that the covert operation could compromise the global campaign to eradicate polio. Late last month, a handful of vaccine workers, including a teenage girl, paid the price for the CIA's deceit: They were gunned down as they tried to give the polio vaccine to children living in the Pakistani city of Karachi and other areas. No one has taken responsibility for the attacks, although the Pakistani Taliban has threatened vaccine workers in the past.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Every year, health organizations spend millions in the developing world attacking the iron-deficiency disorder known as anemia. They pay special attention to pregnant women, a population highly vulnerable to the disease. Every year, though, 115,000 of those women die in childbirth from anemia-related problems. More than 600,000 infants do the same. "We've known for a long time that maternal anemia is one of the great causes of death in mothers and newborns," said Wendy Taylor, director of the Center for Accelerating Impact and Innovation at the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.
NEWS
By Orin S. Levine and Myron M. Levine | June 25, 2012
This month, leaders from around the globe announced a road map for ending preventable child deaths within a generation. Essentially, the ambitious plan aims to assure that every child has the same opportunity for a fifth birthday and a future beyond childhood, thereby ending one of the most obvious social injustices in the world today. Some will question whether this period of austerity is the time for an ambitious new global health goal. If skepticism had prevailed a half-century ago, it would have derailed one of humanity's great victories: smallpox eradication.
NEWS
By Tyler Brown, Kaci Hickox, Mike Rogers and Jane Andrews | October 14, 2010
Worldwide, 10 million people die each year because they cannot access medicines for treatable diseases. While Johns Hopkins University is a world-renowned research institution and a leading force in promoting global health, students remain deeply troubled that our university has not committed to making the medicines it helps discover available and affordable to the world's poor. Last week, in an interview with WYPR's Dan Rodricks, Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels heralded the university's contributions to improving health throughout the developing world.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Hundreds of thousands of people die of malaria every year, most of them in Africa. Dr. Eddy C. Agbo wants people to get diagnosed quickly and easily - right in their homes - so they can seek treatment. The barrier to quick and easy diagnoses is that all available tests require blood. His Baltimore company is readying a version that uses urine - just like a pregnancy test. It should hit the market next year. Agbo, chief executive of Fyodor Biotechnologies, grew up in Nigeria and envisions the malaria test as the first in a line of products that could make an impact in developing countries.
NEWS
By Carole Mitnick | April 3, 2009
China has called an urgent meeting that could affect your life, and it's not about the global economic crisis - or global warming. Instead, it's about a quiet global health threat that is more disturbing than you probably assume: the silent spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) around the world. Many global health leaders are in Beijing this week trying to draw attention to the danger, including Bill Gates, whose foundation has given billions of dollars to fight diseases; Margaret Chan, the director-general of the World Health Organization; and senior representatives from more than two dozen nations, including the United States.
NEWS
By CHENG WEN-TSANG | May 26, 2006
Each year for nearly a decade, rejection of Taiwan's application to participate in the World Health Assembly has been treated as an annual ritual. This year, the international community should review the issue more thoroughly. The World Health Organization was established with lofty ideals. Like the International Committee of the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders, it should transcend national borders and political conflicts to offer assistance to all those who are suffering from illness and promote health for all of humankind.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.