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By FRANZ SCHURMANN | July 11, 1993
Even if the agreements reached at the G-7 Tokyo economic summitshould fall apart, NAFTA not pass Congress and GATT founder on European resistance, there is no way the world economy can be undone -- unless the world gives up on economic growth. And because the ineradicable flip side of the world economy is global migration, there also is no way it can be stopped.As these twin dynamics gain ground, the vision of European unity fades, along with giant regional economies in Europe, East Asia and North America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2014
The commentary regarding challenges facing the U.S. in the global economy ("Corvette economics," March 2) contained the most succinct and clear descriptions of our two chaotic political parties in the last 30 years that I have ever read. It is a shame those paragraphs can't be plastered across America to wake up the average, inattentive citizen as to the inefficiencies of our current parties and the lack of caring displayed by the politicians. Raymond Daniel Burke is correct - politicians of both parties are displaying unbelievable inadequacies serving the issues facing us nationally and globally.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 2, 2008
The business press paints the Federal Reserve as omnipotent. Maybe once it was. But events are likely to prove it has lost some of its mojo. The nation's central bank controls a smaller piece of the global economy than in the last severe recession, in the early 1980s. And it no longer influences the price of oil as it once did. Those seldom-acknowledged facts make its job more difficult, and the outcome of its efforts to fight inflation or keep the country out of a bad recession more uncertain.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | March 19, 2014
Finding the road to a healthy economic policy sometimes is a matter of getting behind the wheel the proper performance vehicle. Driving the new Corvette Stingray is as enlightening as it is thrilling. The engine roars to life and propels you effortlessly, while its cylinder deactivation system produces astonishing fuel economy for a car with such unbridled power. Shifts are quick and nearly seamless. The steering is tight and responsive and combines with the rigid yet lightweight body and chassis to produce a glorious driving experience.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | March 19, 2014
Finding the road to a healthy economic policy sometimes is a matter of getting behind the wheel the proper performance vehicle. Driving the new Corvette Stingray is as enlightening as it is thrilling. The engine roars to life and propels you effortlessly, while its cylinder deactivation system produces astonishing fuel economy for a car with such unbridled power. Shifts are quick and nearly seamless. The steering is tight and responsive and combines with the rigid yet lightweight body and chassis to produce a glorious driving experience.
NEWS
Ron Smith | September 15, 2011
When considering our economic crisis, remember this: The yet unborn and those now too young to vote won't be paying off the debts piled up by the "Greatest Generation," the Baby-Boomers they sired, members of Gen X or any of their other predecessors. Predicting how the future will play out is a fool's game, but I make the above prediction with great confidence. If you haven't yet grasped it, government debt in the U.S., Europe and Japan has grown to such heights that it is literally unrepayable.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | January 6, 1994
THE EXPANDING global market, the author writes, "has drawn from under the feet of industry the national ground on which it stood. All long-established national industries have been destroyed or are daily being destroyed."They are dislodged by new industries, whose introduction becomes a life-and-death question for all civilized nations, by industries that no longer work up indigenous raw material but raw material drawn from the remotest zones; industries whose products are consumed, not only at home, but in every quarter of the globe.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | May 10, 2002
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- The PBS series Commanding Heights has brought the drama and sweep of the 20th-century economy to the American public in a thoughtful and entertaining package. Yet the most important idea it conveyed slipped in and out of the show within the first 10 minutes. Viewers were treated to a brief glimpse of life a century ago, enough to show we are not living in the initial globalization but in the sequel. The hammer blows of two world wars, the Depression and rampant protectionism shattered the first global economy so completely that international trade did not regain its former importance until sometime in the Carter or Reagan presidencies.
NEWS
September 10, 2001
FINALLY, China expects the World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva this week to decide on its admission to the global economy. Some tariff reductions and increases in trade have already begun, in anticipation of that happening in early 2002. This movement coincides with diplomatic activity. China's foreign minister is coming to Washington this month to help prepare a state visit there by President Bush in October. China does not agree to U.S. national missile defense, and the Bush administration has not accepted Chinese missile modernization, but each is willing to discuss the other's ideas.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2003
PARIS - Finance officials from the world's leading industrialized nations met yesterday to coordinate efforts to promote economic growth and to gird the global economy against the shocks of a potential war in Iraq. But the Group of 7, facing similar divisions over Iraq that have split other international institutions, skirted plans that would deal with the negative economic effects of a war. Instead, the nations issued a more general statement about addressing a sagging global economy.
NEWS
By Mickey Matthews | November 4, 2013
As reports of an improving economy continue to trickle in, many businesses in the Baltimore area are realizing that global forces could very well positively impact our area and that now is the time to respond to these emerging trends. This area is in a unique position, with a relatively strong economy, a port with growing capacity, a base of businesses for the 21st century, and access to top talent. This infrastructure bodes well for the Baltimore/Washington area, but only if businesses recognize that we are part of a global economy.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | October 17, 2013
I've spent the last two weeks in Latin America - where they know something about defaulting on public debts. As part of a bipartisan group of former U.S. ambassadors, I met with business leaders, central bankers, government officials and ordinary citizens. They all asked: what is going on in the U.S. Congress? Is the U.S. really going to default on its debt because of the political game playing? Along with my traveling companions, Republicans as well as Democrats, I repeatedly reassured them that we were confident that cooler heads would prevail and default would be avoided.
NEWS
February 9, 2013
I take issue with much of Lane Windham's recent commentary ("If not labor unions, then what?" Jan. 29) beginning with the fundamental premise that it was the unions that provided us with economic redistribution. Like many other academicians, Ms. Windham confuses correlation with causation throughout her thought process. The simple presence of unions in the United States during our rise as the undisputed economic world leader does not establish them as the cause of a better or fairer distribution of wealth.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | November 6, 2012
Regardless of who wins the U.S. presidential election today, one thing seems certain: Americans are about to learn the same hard lessons recently visited upon the French and the British. That is, whoever ends up being elected head of any given political system will be required to work within the confines of current global economic forces. Candidates can promise all the economic changes they want within their particular national bubble, but nothing will actually change without the blessing of the global market gods.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 13, 2012
It would seem that we're now at the stage of global economic lunacy where the worldwide socialist slide is so far gone that the president of Russia is lecturing the world, and particularly Europe, about the risks of socialism. Speaking at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference in Vladivostok, Russia, Vladimir Putin promoted the merits of free-market economics. He said that by pulling the former Soviet satellite states into its sphere after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Europe chose to take responsibility for subsidizing their economic well-being.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 2, 2012
Europe is in recession. Portugal, Italy and Greece are basket cases. The British and Spanish economies have contracted for the last two quarters. It seems highly likely that France and Germany are in a double dip as well. Why should we care? Because a recession in the world's third-largest economy (Europe) combined with the current slowdown in the world's second-largest (China), spells trouble for the world's largest (that's still us). Remember, it's a global economy. Money moves across borders at the speed of an electronic impulse.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | September 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The World Bank announced yesterday a $1.8 billion environmental-loan program for Mexico, a down payment on the multibillion-dollar border cleanup that would occur if the North American Free Trade Agreement is approved."
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
Administrators and instructors from nearly a third of Baltimore County's public schools brainstormed about creative strategies yesterday with business and government leaders. About 100 principals and teachers attended the event, a conference on innovation organized by the Regional Manufacturing Institute of Maryland. The institute and the county school district have formed a partnership to impart to educators the trends of the global economy and to help them prepare students for future job markets.
NEWS
September 30, 2011
In keeping with your editorial regarding the nation's dysfunctional political system and how to impacts our place in the global economy ("Crisis made, averted," Sept. 28), I have a tidbit to add. Getting ready for a trip, I got out three blazers to pack. Because of your editorial it suddenly came to me to check the labels in these blazers. One label says it was made in Poland, one says Vietnam, and other Indonesia. Contributors all to our government's new economic problems, and, believe it or not, horrendous taking away of money that should go to our government in taxes.
NEWS
Ron Smith | September 15, 2011
When considering our economic crisis, remember this: The yet unborn and those now too young to vote won't be paying off the debts piled up by the "Greatest Generation," the Baby-Boomers they sired, members of Gen X or any of their other predecessors. Predicting how the future will play out is a fool's game, but I make the above prediction with great confidence. If you haven't yet grasped it, government debt in the U.S., Europe and Japan has grown to such heights that it is literally unrepayable.
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