Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGlobal Climate
IN THE NEWS

Global Climate

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 10, 2012
One can just imagine the future "Jeopardy" TV quiz show answer: The name of the international conference that took place in early December of 2012 that critics universally panned for accomplishing little despite overwhelming evidence of a global ecological catastrophe on the horizon. "Alex, what is the Doha Climate Change Conference?" would be the winning question and surely worth a lot to the right contestant. After all, the planet is already in "double jeopardy" - not only from climate change but from the continuing failure of the wealthiest nations to do much about it. As President Barack Obama is looking to come up with $60-to-$80 billion to offset the worst effects of Hurricane Sandy, a storm that practically shut down New York City, the world's media center, one would think the call to avoid more such costly catastrophes in the future would be deafening.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 20, 2014
The late, great New York senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, famously said, "You are entitled to your opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. " That sentiment, however wise, seems sadly quaint in an era when many Americans strongly prefer a "reality" that conforms to their opinion, not to objective facts. A fresh case in point is Marco Rubio, the boyish Florida senator who is considered a serious contender for the U.S. presidency in 2016. Sunday, on ABC's "This Week," Mr. Rubio said, "I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it," adding that he also did "not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 2, 2009
With the recession deepening and numerous other world crises brewing, President-elect Barack Obama may be tempted to postpone any action on global warming until after his first year in office. This would be a huge mistake for a host of reasons, but most particularly because time is running out for mankind to take the needed actions to thwart the most disastrous effects of climate change. The planet is not merely approaching a perilous situation when it comes to the effects of man-made greenhouse gases; that day has already arrived.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
NEWS
December 20, 2009
Maryland's alcohol tax, one of the lowest in the nation, hasn't been raised in decades. Should the General Assembly raise the tax next year to help close the state's budget shortfall? Yes 46% No 51% Not sure 2% (2,157 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Did the global climate conference in Copenhagen accomplish anything important? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Climate forecasters canceled an El Nino watch Thursday, with the climate phenomenon no longer expected to arrive this winter. Recent updates had already indicated El Nino was growing less likely, but the probability it will form has fallen to below 50 percent starting in December. In a monthly outlook published Thursday, the U.S. Climate Prediction Center wrote that while El Nino cannot be ruled out, onset is increasingly unlikely over the next six months. The change in forecast may disappoint snow lovers in Maryland, as El Nino winters are associated with above normal snowfall here.
NEWS
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,NEWSDAY | December 18, 2003
Signs that global warming is changing patterns of rain, snow and ocean currents that drive the climate system were reported yesterday by scientists monitoring ocean saltiness. According to oceanographer Ruth Curry, sea surface waters in tropical regions have become significantly saltier in the past 50 years, while surface waters at high latitudes in Arctic regions have become much fresher. These changes in salinity seem to have accelerated in the 1990s. "This is the signature of increasing evaporation and precipitation" caused by warming, Curry said, "and a sign of melting ice at the poles.
NEWS
January 13, 2009
No proof man is causing Earth's warming trend According to the editorial "A New Year's resolution" (Jan. 2), tens of thousands of scientists like me are "flat-earth types." I guess my doctorate in chemical physics from Johns Hopkins doesn't give me nearly the qualifications to analyze the science associated with the global climate as an editor with an agenda. If we are going to stoop to name-calling, an appropriate name for people with the view The Baltimore Sun endorses could be "Chicken Littles."
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER | October 28, 2008
Global climate change could undermine efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay by flooding coastal areas and washing more pollution into the water, a new scientific report warns. The report, issued yesterday by the federal bay program office in Annapolis, notes that scientists have detected significant increases in sea level and bay water temperature over the past century. Further changes are likely, the report says, especially if current emissions of greenhouse gases continue unabated. Coastal flooding is likely if sea level rises 2 to 5 feet, as climate-change models project, the report says.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
In your editorial on Doha's failure ("Global climate talks stall - again," Dec. 11), you wrote: "The people who went to the polls last month knew which candidate favored stronger action in this arena and voted for him. " We voted for President Barack Obama to set sane energy policies, rational environmental policies and logical fiscal policies. Until the House is ready to present him with the sensible fiscal legislation he wants, President Obama should ignore fiscal issues and focus on educating the public on the energy and environmental legislation needed to slow climate change.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Your editorial on the International Energy Agency's "World Energy Outlook Special Report: Redrawing the Climate Energy Map" was right on the money ("Climate change warnings," June 11). Having read several books about the lead-up to World War II, it is as if the same phenomenon of global denial is in operation here all over again. The harsh reality is quite clear to those who are paying even the slightest bit of attention, but no one wants to acknowledge or do anything about it. Humanity is racing at breakneck speed toward the edge of the deepest drop-off it has ever faced - and everyone is arguing about where they will sit. Or they are refusing to acknowledge that a cliff is there at all. The same was true prior to World War II. Hitler started rebuilding the German war machine.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Declaring that Maryland's coastal areas are increasingly at risk from a rising sea level, Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered state agencies to weigh the growing risks of flooding in deciding where and how to construct state buildings. "Billions of dollars of investments in public infrastructure will be threatened if the state of Maryland fails to prepare adequately for climate change," he said in Friday's executive order, which calls for avoiding low-lying sites and elevating new or reconstructed state buildings to avert flooding.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
In your editorial on Doha's failure ("Global climate talks stall - again," Dec. 11), you wrote: "The people who went to the polls last month knew which candidate favored stronger action in this arena and voted for him. " We voted for President Barack Obama to set sane energy policies, rational environmental policies and logical fiscal policies. Until the House is ready to present him with the sensible fiscal legislation he wants, President Obama should ignore fiscal issues and focus on educating the public on the energy and environmental legislation needed to slow climate change.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Spurred by a recent article in Rolling Stone, some Baltimore television meteorologists are weighing in against global climate change -- and are drawing some criticism for it. WBAL-TV's Tony Pann shared the article, which calls some TV meteorologists "climate crackpots", on his Facebook page. He, along with others like WMAR-TV's Mike Masco and former WMAR meteorologist Justin Berk, argue climate change is an unproven theory. The Rolling Stone article, published Dec. 5 , questions why more TV meteorologists don't agree with global warming.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
One can just imagine the future "Jeopardy" TV quiz show answer: The name of the international conference that took place in early December of 2012 that critics universally panned for accomplishing little despite overwhelming evidence of a global ecological catastrophe on the horizon. "Alex, what is the Doha Climate Change Conference?" would be the winning question and surely worth a lot to the right contestant. After all, the planet is already in "double jeopardy" - not only from climate change but from the continuing failure of the wealthiest nations to do much about it. As President Barack Obama is looking to come up with $60-to-$80 billion to offset the worst effects of Hurricane Sandy, a storm that practically shut down New York City, the world's media center, one would think the call to avoid more such costly catastrophes in the future would be deafening.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Climate forecasters canceled an El Nino watch Thursday, with the climate phenomenon no longer expected to arrive this winter. Recent updates had already indicated El Nino was growing less likely, but the probability it will form has fallen to below 50 percent starting in December. In a monthly outlook published Thursday, the U.S. Climate Prediction Center wrote that while El Nino cannot be ruled out, onset is increasingly unlikely over the next six months. The change in forecast may disappoint snow lovers in Maryland, as El Nino winters are associated with above normal snowfall here.
NEWS
By BRYN NELSON and BRYN NELSON,NEWSDAY | January 12, 2006
NEW YORK -- From Costa Rica to Peru, a fungal epidemic fueled by global warming may have wiped out dozens of frog species in otherwise pristine environments, a new study concludes. Within the past 20 years, about two-thirds of Central and South America's 110 brightly colored harlequin frog species have vanished. A killer fungus with a worldwide range and an affinity for amphibian skin had previously been indicted as a prime suspect in their disappearances. But a study that will be published today in the journal Nature concludes that the fungal epidemic has been stoked primarily by global warming, a finding that may have broad implications for at-risk species around the world.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
I have a lot of respect for Mike Tidwell, but I was disappointed in his op-ed piece, "The sky really is falling" (Feb. 14). In my opinion, it was a classic piece of Chicken Little journalism. No matter what weather we have -- snow, drought, heat or cold -- virtually anything that is out of the normal is blamed on global warming. Match a single extreme weather event with a single facet of a complex, multifaceted theory, and the conclusion is, "Aha! Proof! The sky is falling!" In fact, the global climate is an extremely complex, interrelated and incompletely understood system, affected by much more than air pollutant emissions from human activities.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 7, 2012
Conservatives have been howling for the last week that the backlash against Chick-fil-Aafter President and COO Dan Cathy expressed opposition to gay marriage amounts to an attack on the First Amendment. Yes, people who serve, eat or profit from the sale of those tasty, Southern-style chicken-and-pickle sandwiches are perfectly entitled to express their political views. But Mr. Cathy's defenders seem to be confused about what the First Amendment guarantees. It provides him with a right to express his views.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
I have a lot of respect for Mike Tidwell, but I was disappointed in his op-ed piece, "The sky really is falling" (Feb. 14). In my opinion, it was a classic piece of Chicken Little journalism. No matter what weather we have -- snow, drought, heat or cold -- virtually anything that is out of the normal is blamed on global warming. Match a single extreme weather event with a single facet of a complex, multifaceted theory, and the conclusion is, "Aha! Proof! The sky is falling!" In fact, the global climate is an extremely complex, interrelated and incompletely understood system, affected by much more than air pollutant emissions from human activities.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.