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NEWS
August 30, 2010
I was very excited when I read your article about early voting and especially the ability to access absentee ballots on-line and send them in ("Vote early, not often," Editorial, Aug. 29). I can get out to vote (I work for the Baltimore County Public Schools and we are closed on election day) but I prefer not to. I am 61 years old and have voted in every election since I was old enough. but I would love to be able to vote from my home. I attempted to access the on-line ballot and it won't pull up. I am fairly computer knowledgeable and it frustrates me so I can only imagine how this is going to put other people off and limit the number folks who use the service.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2014
Pardon us if we are not completely reassured by officials' insistence that glitches recently discovered in the Connecticut Affordable Care Act health insurance exchange that Maryland is in the process of adapting will be fixed well before the site goes live here in November. To learn that a coding error there caused inaccurate bills, unpaid subsidies, mistaken Medicaid enrollments or outright dropped coverage for more than 5,000 people is not encouraging - particularly since officials there initially misdiagnosed the problem as an isolated incident before backtracking this month to acknowledge a problem with their software.
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NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | December 17, 2013
Maryland's Obamacare website, the Maryland Health Connection, isn't the only website that needs fixing.  Lt. Governor Anthony Brown's campaign website still claims under the “Real Results” section:  "Led the nation in implementing the Affordable Care Act, which independent studies show will reduce the number of uninsured in Maryland by 50%, and create $3 billion in annual economic activity and 26,000 jobs in Maryland by 2020; " ...
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
A glitch at the Baltimore 911 call center caused wait times of a minute or more for some callers reporting crimes and emergencies Monday night, city officials said. The issue was resolved shortly before 11 p.m., the city's Office of Emergency Management announced. Callers who got an answering machine were asked to stay on the line until a dispatcher picked up, while those who get a busy tone were told to hang up and call back. "We're asking for your patience," said Scott Brillman, the city's acting 911 center director.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
State Farm said Thursday that a glitch in its automated billing process resulted in 80,000 customers, including about 4,300 in Maryland, being charged twice as much as usual this month. The problem affected customers in a dozen states and the District of Columbia who have monthly premiums automatically debited from their bank account, said spokesman Phil Supple. The insurer is still looking into the cause of the problem. It became aware of the double-billing Wednesday morning and within 24 hours returned the overpayment to customers' accounts, Supple said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Verizon restored 911 service to Howard County customers late Monday evening, police said. Police had asked residents to use an alternate emergency number for several hours before announcing just before 11 p.m. that Verizon had fixed a technical glitch. Some residents who attempted to dial 911 from landlines received a fast busy signal. County police spread word of the problem using recorded phone messages. Police said they were uncertain how many people had experienced the problem but were alerted to it when a nursing home staff member in Columbia failed to get through on an emergency call.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
A glitch at the Baltimore 911 call center caused wait times of a minute or more for some callers reporting crimes and emergencies Monday night, city officials said. The issue was resolved shortly before 11 p.m., the city's Office of Emergency Management announced. Callers who got an answering machine were asked to stay on the line until a dispatcher picked up, while those who get a busy tone were told to hang up and call back. "We're asking for your patience," said Scott Brillman, the city's acting 911 center director.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 3, 2012
Eileen Chiat got a very surprising letter from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. last week -- a turn-off notice. Even though she didn't miss a payment. "I went bonkers," the Owings Mills resident said. A confluence of events was behind the mistake, according to BGE. Chiat pays by automatic deduction, her due date fell during the Thanksgiving holiday and this was the first time since BGE launched a new billing system in January that its business office had been closed for two consecutive weekdays.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
A glitch in the Baltimore Fire Department's payroll system, which is in the midst of a technological upgrade, left more than 100 employees with a substantially reduced paycheck yesterday, according to city and firefighter union officials. Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for Mayor Sheila Dixon, said 111 employees, instead of being paid for 73 hours of work, only received pay for 10 hours. He said that problems merging two payroll systems resulted in some firefighters getting paid for hours worked instead of days.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
Pimlico Race Course officials were tying up loose ends yesterday as business returned to near-normal after a weekend of confusion caused by computer malfunctions."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 7, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown remains the heavy favorite to win the Democratic gubernatorial primary because the only thing that could have hurt him — his role as O'Malley administration "point man" for Obamacare in Maryland — won't hurt him. And it won't hurt him for a simple reason: the math. Not enough Democratic voters were "inconvenienced" (and, therefore, outraged) by last year's health exchange problems. Most Marylanders already had insurance; they didn't have to go anywhere near the state's glitch-riddled online marketplace.
NEWS
By John B. Chessare | April 17, 2014
Americans should not be deterred from working to improve our health care system despite difficulties with implementing the websites of the health insurance exchanges as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Our resolve for improved health care should be stronger than ever. The U.S. has the best doctors and nurses in the world, and they work very hard, but they work every day in a broken system. We spend 40 percent more per capita on care than other countries, yet we do not provide coverage for all of our citizens.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
When the bill arrived from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, I expected to open it and see that I owed $250 by March 15. Instead it was for $286. That's $36 more than Maryland health exchange website showed my insurance plan would cost. This was the latest snafu in my quest to buy health insurance through the state's troubled online exchange, which has been beset for months by technical problems. The enrollment process took me five hours and 22 minutes and included two calls to the exchange's call center, seven attempts to enter my personal information, two computers and two web browsers.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. expects to restore power by Friday to the last several thousand customers affected by this week's ice storm. With 400 workers from outside the region assisting 1,100 BGE contractors and employees, utility officials planned to tackle repairs affecting smaller pockets of customers and those with extensive tree damage. Those customers were frustrated as they faced the start of a third day without electricity, sometimes with limited information on repairs due to a BGE computer glitch.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
With a deadline Tuesday for uninsured Marylanders to secure health coverage retroactive to Jan. 1, would-be enrollees continued to report frustration with the state's troubled health exchange. Matthew Silverglate, a 29-year-old server and bartender from Ellicott City, said Monday he had been calling and logging on to the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange for two months, and still had not been able to price out a private health plan. Dr. Peter Beilenson, who heads an insurance cooperative that sells coverage on the exchange, said he made four separate calls last week, using four different names, to try to get an appointment with a plan navigator.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Hundreds of people who got stuck on Maryland's glitch-ridden health exchange have ended up on the phone with Sue Lunz. And her pottery supply business. In Seattle. The state mistakenly listed her company's 1-800 number on the website, directing some people who couldn't pick a health insurance provider not to the state's call center, but to a West Coast business that manufactures specialty kilns. Some days, Lunz said, she gets a handful of frustrated health insurance shoppers, but more often several dozen bombard her small company each day, desperate for assistance navigating an exchange whose technical problems have made it among the worst in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and By Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2000
Some of America Online's 23 million users are complaining that they can't connect or stay connected to the service, a problem caused by a glitch in the newly released Windows Millenium Edition. Microsoft officials acknowledge the problem and have created a "quick-fix" file they say will take care of the bug, which is caused by incompatibilities between Windows ME and AOL when the computer is using a Windows Driver Model modem. These inexpensive modems work only under Windows and are common in many consumer-grade computers shipped by large manufacturers.
SPORTS
February 13, 2007
Good morning -- Orioles -- Can't have hope spring eternal without a last-minute glitch.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
Marylanders who use the federal health reform site to search for navigators who can help them enroll in health plans in-person are getting directed to agencies in other states. The problem lies with a glitch in the federal website that occurs when Marylanders type in their zip code. The website directs users to navigators in Pennsylvania, Virginia and other states. Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for Maryland's website, said state officials are "aware of the problem and we've reached out to (Health and Human Services)
HEALTH
By Michael Dresser and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The O'Malley administration will propose emergency legislation to provide retroactive health coverage to people who tried to sign up by the end of the year but were stymied by the technical problems that have plagued Maryland's online insurance exchange. At a briefing Friday by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, officials said they hoped to put the bill on the fast track when the General Assembly begins its annual 90-day session Wednesday. Brown, the administration's point person on implementation of the federal Affordable Care Act, said the bill would allow a few hundred to as many as 5,000 people to receive coverage retroactive to Jan. 1 through the Maryland Health Insurance Plan, a state program created to insure high-risk customers.
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