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By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
A Woodbine farmer sought yesterday to end a decades-old dispute with his neighbors by giving up his desire to resume glider operations on his property.The county Board of Zoning Appeals had been expected to decide yesterday whether Michael R. Harrison would be allowed to resume glider operations on his 172-acre farm. His glider port has been closed since March 1997, when a glider crashed there, slightly injuring the pilot and a passenger.But in a surprise move yesterday, Harrison asked the board to reopen the latest round of hearings in the 3-decade-old case to allow him to read "a two-sentence letter that would make your decision easier."
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FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
When Katie Byram and her family moved to a 1920s farmhouse in Baltimore County, they were charmed by its old-fashioned wraparound porch. Only one thing would make it even better: a porch swing. "I knew our kids would enjoy it," said Byram, who tapped interior designer Katherine Crosby to sketch plans for a "bohemian" seating area. They envisioned teak furniture from Thailand, outdoor rugs, potted plants — and a dark wooden swing. While the project is still in the early stages, Byram is already dreaming of relaxing in the swing as it sways in the summer breeze.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
The pilot and a female passenger were injured yesterday when a glider crashed in a cornfield while trying to land at Woodbine Glider Port off Gillis Falls Road, state police said.Cpl. Tim Selby of the Westminster Barracks said the two, in their mid-50s and from Reston, Va., were in a Schweizer twin-seater glider about 3 p.m. when the pilot tried to land. Selby said they had been in the air about 15 to 20 minutes after detaching from the tow plane.Selby said the glider missed the landing strip and crashed into a cornfield near the glider port.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
Robert Gaspar Leginus Sr., who flew gliders during World War II and later served as a military intelligence analyst, died Feb. 20. He was 98. Mr. Leginus died at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia, said his son Robert Leginus Jr. He had lived in Columbia since the 1990s. Mr. Leginus was born in 1913 in Wyoming, Pa. He learned to fly at the Wilkes-Barre Wyoming Valley Airport, developing a lifelong fascination with flying and aircraft. "His biggest dream was to become an astronaut," his son said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Carroll County's oldest zoning case -- a 28-year battle over the use of a Woodbine airfield -- will reopen at 9: 30 a.m. today in the new conference room of the county office building.On one side is 45-year-old farmer Michael R. Harrison, a lifelong county resident who says he needs to rent part of the farm as a glider port to make ends meet.On the other side is a group of nearby residents led by Bernard A. Schwartz. Residents say the airfield has a bad safety record -- numerous accidents and several fatalities -- and that it has an adverse effect on their property values.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
Residents opposed to the reopening of a Woodbine glider port will take the stand Wednesday in the longest-running zoning case ever heard by the Carroll Board of Zoning Appeals."
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | October 7, 1990
WOODBINE - The zoning dispute over a small, grass airstrip in South Carroll will not land before the nation's highest court.Attorneys involved in the legal tussle over the Woodbine Glider Port were notified last week that the U.S. Supreme Court has denied a request that it hear the 8-year-old legal dispute over the airstrip.In July, the County Commissioners, along with residents opposed to a glider-ride business that operates at the airstrip off Gillis Falls Road, filed a request with the Supreme Court to hear the case, which originated from a zoning board decision limiting flight traffic at the airport.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
James Albert Colimore Sr., a highly decorated World War II glider pilot and entertainment columnist who chronicled Baltimore's night life for more than 25 years, died Sunday of leukemia at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 86.Mr. Colimore began his newspaper career delivering papers for the News-Post and Sunday American in the late 1920s and later joined the newspaper's advertising department. He retired in 1979.His column "Table Talk," which evolved into "After Dark," recorded the foibles and vagaries of the city's nightclub owners, restaurateurs and entertainers who performed in such legendary late-night watering holes as the Chanticleer at Charles at Eager streets.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
A Woodbine farmer sought yesterday to end a decades-old dispute with his neighbors by giving up his desire to resume glider operations on his property.The county Board of Zoning Appeals had been expected to decide yesterday whether Michael R. Harrison would be allowed to resume glider operations on his 172-acre farm. His glider port has been closed since March 1997, when a glider crashed there, slightly injuring the pilot and a passenger.But in a surprise move yesterday, Harrison asked the board to reopen the latest round of hearings in the 3-decade-old case to allow him to read "a two-sentence letter that would make your decision easier."
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | August 11, 1991
The owner of a glider-ride operation is seeking to reorganize under federal bankruptcy law, saying the cost of waging a lengthy battle with county zoning administrators is driving him out of business.Bay Soaring Inc., which operates out of the Woodbine Gliderport, filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act on Aug. 1, according to documents on file at U.S. District Court in Baltimore.On Thursday, H. Gerard Gaudet, president of Aviation Customer Services Inc., the parent company of Bay Soaring, said $80,000 in legal and administrative bills over the past eight years has pushed the business to the edge.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
State police have identified the victims of a glider crash near St. Mary's Regional Airport in Southern Maryland. James Michael Dayton, 55, from Mechanicsville, was killed in the plane crash, and Nicholas John Mirales, 53, from Prince Frederick, was taken to Prince George's County Shock Trauma Center, according to police. National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson says the Slingsby 49B glider crashed into trees Friday afternoon shortly after takeoff when it became disconnected from its towing plane.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | April 6, 2008
Julio Valcarcel III built a self-propelled machine, a remote-controlled robot and a wooden catapult for competitions yesterday at the Maryland State Science Olympiad at the Johns Hopkins University. He is 13. In an event dubbed "The Scrambler," the Thurmont Middle School eighth-grader and his seventh-grade teammate Morgan Smith launched the self-propelled device from a ramp toward a wall 9 meters away. It had to start and stop on its own, without cracking a raw egg attached to the contraption's nose (hence the name of the event)
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
John Appling yelled out, signaling a takeoff. Seconds later, he extended his arm upward, activated a winch to propel his model glider and watched the craft quickly ascend into the sky. Appling toggled his remote control, trying to smoothly guide his plane to a higher altitude, then had it drifting up and down through the muggy air. The 53-year-old Hampstead resident was a contestant in yesterday's Baltimore Area Soaring Society's August contest at...
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 2002
First in an occasional seriesWARRENTON, Va. - On a grass runway last fall, amid the low rolling hills of the countryside, Terry Queijo prepared for takeoff. Her 32-foot aircraft, a reproduction of a 1902 Wright brothers glider, resembled an overgrown box kite made of wood and bed sheets. It hardly looked flight-worthy. Resting belly to earth in the glider's cradle, the Eastern Shore resident concentrated intently as a pickup truck ahead cruised down the runway at 25 mph - glider in tow. Within moments, Queijo ascended, hovering 20 feet above the earth.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2002
OKA STATE NATURE RESERVE, Russia - Lean, light and hawk-profiled, hang-glider Angelo d'Arrigo twitches with a birdlike intensity and tends to push himself higher, ever higher, unsatisfied by the bounds of gravity. So it is no coincidence that d'Arrigo wants to become a bird. Or, at least as close to one as is humanly possible. He calls it his five-year "Metamorphosis" project. And as part of it, he is embarking on one of the most ambitious - and unusual - wildlife rescue plans ever devised.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 1, 2002
The Dream Catalog: A revolutionary, new, illustrated directory of the most beautiful, stylish and amazing objects available on the Internet (Cassell Academic, distributed by Sterling, 496 pages, $24.95). "The Dream Catalog is not strictly a consumer guide," editor Raphaele Vidaling writes in a brief introduction, "but rather a catalog of temptation that flirts with the readers' imagination and their wish lists." And so it is -- there are no prices, the only access to products illustrated are through their Web sites, which is precisely how this gigantic confection of material fantasies was put together.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
The Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals postponed a decision yesterday on whether to allow a Woodbine glider port to reopen, guaranteeing that the longest-running case in board history will continue for at least one more session.Neighbors of the Woodbine Glider Port testified at a daylong hearing yesterday that allowing the airstrip to reopen would mean a return to the noise of airplane engines and danger of crashes that marred their weekends before the airstrip closed in March 1997.Farmer and airstrip owner Michael R. Harrison presented his arguments for reopening the glider port to the board at an Aug. 26 hearing.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
After years of legal wrangling, the dispute over a glider-ride operation at a Woodbine airfield landed Friday where it began -- before county zoning administrators.The lengthy, convoluted dispute was revived when arguments over a zoning permit for the grass airstrip on Gillis Falls Road were presented to the Carroll Board of Zoning Appeals.On one side are airstrip owner Robert E. Harrison and Henry G. Gaudet, operator of the glider business. They say the county erredwhen it revoked the original permit in 1984 and issued a new one carrying several conditions.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | January 21, 2001
One look into those dark eyes, and 14-year-old Holly Reidt was hooked. This was no case of puppy love. It was something else entirely. It was marsupial love. On Christmas Eve, Holly opened her first gift, and it turned out to be her favorite. It was a sugar glider she named J-J Joey. Tears ran down her cheeks -- while her new pet, an Australian native resembling a flying squirrel, ran up her arm. "No one I know has one," says J-J Joey's proud owner, an eighth grader who also keeps a hamster named Sophia and a 2-year-old yellow Lab named Yallie at her home in Freeland.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
Planes but not gliders will fly again at Woodbine Airfield.The county's longest zoning battle -- which has dragged through six presidencies, numerous attorneys and weeks of testimony -- ended another round yesterday with the Board of Zoning Appeals granting Michael R. Harrison permission to run an airport on his South Carroll farm.Since the 1970s, neighbors of the grass airstrip northeast of Mount Airy have fought to close the airfield, noting numerous fatalities and accidents involving sky-diving, gliders and aircraft.
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