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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 18, 1992
Glenn Gould did not like to be touched.It was partly that neurasthenic fear of physical contact that led him (at the age of 31) to abandon the stage in 1964. But the great Canadian pianist did not abandon his audience. For Gould's retreat to recording and TV studios allowed him to work tirelessly to perfect a vision of musical performance unaffected by the vagaries of time and space.Gould -- who died 10 years ago at the age of 50 -- was not only a great artist, he was also a commercially viable one. That is why his record company, Sony Classical, has just initiated a huge two-year project to reissue almost everything Gould committed to the microphone and the camera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 18, 2008
Celebrated percussionist Evelyn Glennie performs with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight through Sunday, after a decade-long absence. The Grammy-winning Dame Commander of the British Empire will be the soloist in UFO, a big, brilliant work from 1999 by Michael Daugherty. Glennie, 43, was reached by phone in London. An assistant repeated the questions and the percussionist, profoundly deaf since the age of 12, lip-read them and then answered them in her light Scottish accent. Writing about UFO, Daugherty conjures up images of aliens, strange metal objects and Roswell, N.M. Do you have any particular convictions about interplanetary visitors and that sort of thing?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 17, 1994
.TC "Thirty-Two Short Films About Glenn Gould," which opens today at the Rotunda, is a few too many; 26, say, or possibly even 27 would have been just perfect.Situating itself somewhere between biopic and documentary (and borrowing techniques from both), the movie presents snapshots of the great but decidedly eccentric Canadian pianist, composer and radio documentarian over the course of his life. The technique is certainly far from mainstream: set off by preciously arty titles ("45 Seconds and a Chair," "Passion According to Gould," "Diary of One Day")
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 30, 2008
Time was when orchestras toured with lots of music from their homeland, a way of passing out proud calling cards. Then along came globalization, or at least European Unionism. When the Orchestre National de France arrived Monday night at the Kennedy Center for a Washington Performing Arts Society presentation, it brought along its German music director and an all-German program. And when it gives two concerts this week in New York, only one French piece will make it alongside hefty German, Russian and Czech fare.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by pianist Glenn Gould (CBC Records PSCD 2007); Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by Gould (Sony Classical SMK 52 685)Gould was a great mythmaker, and his testamentary in this regard has to do with two recordings of the "Goldbergs": His 1955 debut recording, with its optimism and athleticism, is the pianist's aubade to the dawn; his 1981 recording, which was released shortly before the pianist's death in 1982, are his evening vespers -- his devotional farewell to a musical work with which he was identified almost as much as the composer himself.
FEATURES
By Jim Kramon and Jim Kramon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1995
I have always traveled light in summers, taking with me to our vacation home the minimum of possessions: an extra pair of eye glasses, whatever books I am reading and, of course, my CD of Glenn Gould's 1955 performance of the "Goldberg Variations."This latter item, since it cannot go unplayed for more than a day or two, I generally carry to the car like a life-support device. This year, I inadvertently took with me not Gould's celebrated world standard of the "Variations," but his surprise 1981 re-recording, done only a year before his death at age 50.I discovered my mistake when, one evening before dinner, I played the '81 recording.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
IN THE preface to "Horowitz: His Life and Music," a masterful new biography of pianist Vladimir Horowitz by former New York Times critic Harold C. Schonberg, the author briefly discusses some gossipy exchanges he and the maestro shared regarding other pianists. Apparently Horowitz wasn't much impressed by his competition:"He did not think too highly of the culture and general musicianship of the pianists he heard," recalled Mr. Schonberg. Horowitz' judgment of his fellow artists could be devastating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 22, 2002
This past Wednesday would have been Glenn Gould's 70th birthday. Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the irreplaceable pianist's death. To mark the two occasions, Sony Classical has released a must-have, double commemoration: "Glenn Gould: A State of Wonder" (Sony Classical S3K 87703) - Gould's two downright historic recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations, from 1955 and 1981. It's fitting that the Goldberg Variations turned out to be the musical bookends of Gould's life. The 1955 recording, full of astonishing finger work and fresh insights into Bach's genius, made him an instant star.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | September 28, 1992
A week-long celebration in the city ended yesterday at a graveside in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. It was the final resting place of the pianist Glenn Gould, Toronto's (and perhaps Canada's) most famous native son, who would have been 60 years old last Friday, had he not died almost exactly 10 years ago.But if the cemetery visit honored great achievements, it was also the culmination of a festival that celebrated the possibility of ever greater things to come. For Glenn Gould was more then just a great pianist; he was an eccentric visionary who abandoned the stage at the age of 31, proclaiming that "the concert is dead."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 18, 2008
Celebrated percussionist Evelyn Glennie performs with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight through Sunday, after a decade-long absence. The Grammy-winning Dame Commander of the British Empire will be the soloist in UFO, a big, brilliant work from 1999 by Michael Daugherty. Glennie, 43, was reached by phone in London. An assistant repeated the questions and the percussionist, profoundly deaf since the age of 12, lip-read them and then answered them in her light Scottish accent. Writing about UFO, Daugherty conjures up images of aliens, strange metal objects and Roswell, N.M. Do you have any particular convictions about interplanetary visitors and that sort of thing?
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 22, 2002
This past Wednesday would have been Glenn Gould's 70th birthday. Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the irreplaceable pianist's death. To mark the two occasions, Sony Classical has released a must-have, double commemoration: "Glenn Gould: A State of Wonder" (Sony Classical S3K 87703) - Gould's two downright historic recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations, from 1955 and 1981. It's fitting that the Goldberg Variations turned out to be the musical bookends of Gould's life. The 1955 recording, full of astonishing finger work and fresh insights into Bach's genius, made him an instant star.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by pianist Glenn Gould (CBC Records PSCD 2007); Bach, "Goldberg Variations," performed by Gould (Sony Classical SMK 52 685)Gould was a great mythmaker, and his testamentary in this regard has to do with two recordings of the "Goldbergs": His 1955 debut recording, with its optimism and athleticism, is the pianist's aubade to the dawn; his 1981 recording, which was released shortly before the pianist's death in 1982, are his evening vespers -- his devotional farewell to a musical work with which he was identified almost as much as the composer himself.
FEATURES
By Jim Kramon and Jim Kramon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1995
I have always traveled light in summers, taking with me to our vacation home the minimum of possessions: an extra pair of eye glasses, whatever books I am reading and, of course, my CD of Glenn Gould's 1955 performance of the "Goldberg Variations."This latter item, since it cannot go unplayed for more than a day or two, I generally carry to the car like a life-support device. This year, I inadvertently took with me not Gould's celebrated world standard of the "Variations," but his surprise 1981 re-recording, done only a year before his death at age 50.I discovered my mistake when, one evening before dinner, I played the '81 recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 17, 1994
.TC "Thirty-Two Short Films About Glenn Gould," which opens today at the Rotunda, is a few too many; 26, say, or possibly even 27 would have been just perfect.Situating itself somewhere between biopic and documentary (and borrowing techniques from both), the movie presents snapshots of the great but decidedly eccentric Canadian pianist, composer and radio documentarian over the course of his life. The technique is certainly far from mainstream: set off by preciously arty titles ("45 Seconds and a Chair," "Passion According to Gould," "Diary of One Day")
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | June 28, 1993
The Glenn Gould String Quartet -- named for the brilliant and enigmatic Canadian pianist Glenn Gould, by special permission of the pianist's equally enigmatic estate -- concluded its residency at this year's Columbia Festival of the Arts with a concert Saturday night at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre.Saturday's concert was devoted to three pieces of classical music by composers whose work has been marked by an interest in folk music -- Mark O'Connor's String Quartet, Bartok's "Contrasts," and the Dvorak Quintet in G Major, Opus 77.Mr.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
IN THE preface to "Horowitz: His Life and Music," a masterful new biography of pianist Vladimir Horowitz by former New York Times critic Harold C. Schonberg, the author briefly discusses some gossipy exchanges he and the maestro shared regarding other pianists. Apparently Horowitz wasn't much impressed by his competition:"He did not think too highly of the culture and general musicianship of the pianists he heard," recalled Mr. Schonberg. Horowitz' judgment of his fellow artists could be devastating.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | June 28, 1993
The Glenn Gould String Quartet -- named for the brilliant and enigmatic Canadian pianist Glenn Gould, by special permission of the pianist's equally enigmatic estate -- concluded its residency at this year's Columbia Festival of the Arts with a concert Saturday night at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre.Saturday's concert was devoted to three pieces of classical music by composers whose work has been marked by an interest in folk music -- Mark O'Connor's String Quartet, Bartok's "Contrasts," and the Dvorak Quintet in G Major, Opus 77.Mr.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 30, 2008
Time was when orchestras toured with lots of music from their homeland, a way of passing out proud calling cards. Then along came globalization, or at least European Unionism. When the Orchestre National de France arrived Monday night at the Kennedy Center for a Washington Performing Arts Society presentation, it brought along its German music director and an all-German program. And when it gives two concerts this week in New York, only one French piece will make it alongside hefty German, Russian and Czech fare.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 18, 1992
Glenn Gould did not like to be touched.It was partly that neurasthenic fear of physical contact that led him (at the age of 31) to abandon the stage in 1964. But the great Canadian pianist did not abandon his audience. For Gould's retreat to recording and TV studios allowed him to work tirelessly to perfect a vision of musical performance unaffected by the vagaries of time and space.Gould -- who died 10 years ago at the age of 50 -- was not only a great artist, he was also a commercially viable one. That is why his record company, Sony Classical, has just initiated a huge two-year project to reissue almost everything Gould committed to the microphone and the camera.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | September 28, 1992
A week-long celebration in the city ended yesterday at a graveside in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. It was the final resting place of the pianist Glenn Gould, Toronto's (and perhaps Canada's) most famous native son, who would have been 60 years old last Friday, had he not died almost exactly 10 years ago.But if the cemetery visit honored great achievements, it was also the culmination of a festival that celebrated the possibility of ever greater things to come. For Glenn Gould was more then just a great pianist; he was an eccentric visionary who abandoned the stage at the age of 31, proclaiming that "the concert is dead."
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