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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | February 1, 1991
SARAH, PLAIN and Tall" paints a simple, rich portrait of love and family, using a series of vignettes as an artist would delicate strokes of the brush to fill its canvas with touching, realistic warmth.Based on the Newbery Medal-winning novella by Patricia MacLachlan, who co-authored the screenplay, this CBS Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation tells of a Kansas farmer, a widower named Jacob, who advertises for a wife to help him raise his young daughter and son. Sarah, a proud woman from a fishing family in Maine, answers.
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By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 22, 2008
LOS ANGELES - There's big news from the Television Critics Association press tour regarding Damages: Ted Danson will be back as Arthur Frobisher on the FX show. His performance in Season 1 as the arrogant capitalist was one of the high points of the show, so that's great news. As to whether Frobisher survived being shot at the end of Season 1, well, that's not clear. FX president and general manager John Landgraf said during his remarks that Frobisher did survive, but the Damages creators would only say that because the series moves backward and forward in time, it's possible that we'll see Frobisher in a flashback when the show returns early next year.
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By Virginia Heffernan and Virginia Heffernan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2007
New York -- Patty Hewes frightens Glenn Close. No wonder: Hewes is an ice-eyed trial lawyer and serpentine liar who disdains white-collar violence in favor of open sadism. She never settles for $100 million, in other words, when she can put everyone through hell for a nickel more. But Close is Patty Hewes, the central character in Damages, a cloak-and-dagger legal thriller that begins Tuesday on FX. In 40 years in theater and movies, Close has appeared as Norma Desmond, Cruella de Vil and Alex Forrest, the Medusa-haired bunny boiler of Fatal Attraction.
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October 23, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Patty (Glenn Close, above) continues her quest to ruin Frobisher (Ted Danson) in the season finale of Damages (10 p.m., FX).
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November 20, 1999
Sometimes, even in the world of network television, quality is appreciated."Sarah, Plain & Tall," that splendid turn-of-the-century story of heartland Americana starring Glenn Close and Christopher Walken, set ratings records when it premiered in 1991, becoming the most-watched Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation in the franchise's then 42-year history. With its audience of 50 million viewers, it remains the highest-rated made-for-TV movie of the decade.And, now, comes "Sarah, Plain & Tall: Winter's End," the last of three CBS films based on the Newbery Award-winning work of Patricia MacLachlan.
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August 14, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Patty (Glenn Close) and her team prepare their star witness for her deposition in Damages (10 p.m., FX).
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By Lou Cedrone | January 17, 1991
* ''Eve of Destruction'' A robot, designed to look exactly like her creator, turns bad. Gregory Hines and Renee Sutendijk star.* ''Flight of the Intruder'' A Navy pilot and a bombardier go against orders and bomb Hanoi. Willem Dafoe, Danny Glover and Brad Johnson star.* ''Green Card'' A comedy starring Gerard Depardieu as a Frenchman who marries an American woman (Andie MacDowell) to gain possession of a green card, one that will allow him to work in this country.* ''Hamlet'' Mel Gibson, who was introduced to American audiences as Max Max, plays the melancholy Dane in Franco Zeffirelli's version of the Shakespearean tragedy.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2005
We are tepid voyeurs," Glenn Close bellows, in full Norma Desmond mode, a New York stage diva berating her acting class. "Where is your passion?" She takes her own advice in Heights, a drama set within 24 hours of the lives of artsy New Yorkers. Close is Diana Lee, a wife suffering through yet another failing marriage, with a daughter about to marry Mr. Wrong (she thinks). Close knows she has to give us something to look at because the play's not the thing - not here, anyway. It's all about life in the rarefied air of Manhattan's beautiful strivers, people with the looks, connections and possibilities to be names in New York and unhappily facing that crossroads moment.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Once upon a time - think of 1983's Twilight Zone: The Movie - filmmakers could mount "anthology films": a handful of short tales linked by (if anything) an author, a genre or a recurring character or theme. The Safety of Objects might have been more piquant if the movie's writer-director, Rose Troche, had decided to film A.M. Homes' book of suburban short stories that way. Instead, she divided the stories into their component pieces and erected a vast new Tinker Toy construction. Troche's movie interconnects the families of such distinct characters as a mother (Glenn Close)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 25, 1991
"Some actors," says the British director Stephen Frears, with a mordant, almost blackly humorous laugh, "have a way of just claiming a role. You don't cast them. You try not to cast them in fact. Yet somehow they claim it."And that's what happened in "The Grifters."Frears is noted for unusual casting choices. In "Dangerous Liaisons," for example, he worked against precedent and put Americans Glenn Close and John Malkovich into the center of sexual intrigue in pre-Revolutionary France. The movie dazzled critics and viewers alike.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 20, 2007
DO you believe what you read in the English papers? If so, you'll believe that Glenn Close, Barbra Streisand and Meryl Streep are all elbowing and shoving in order to win the coveted role of a lifetime. That is to play the silent-screen actress Norma Desmond in the eventual movie version of the musical Sunset Boulevard. In this triumvirate, Streep, an Oscar winner many times over, is the youngest contender - she's 58. Her good friend Close is 60. And superstar Streisand is 65 and now riding high after a moneymaking concert-tour abroad.
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By Virginia Heffernan and Virginia Heffernan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2007
New York -- Patty Hewes frightens Glenn Close. No wonder: Hewes is an ice-eyed trial lawyer and serpentine liar who disdains white-collar violence in favor of open sadism. She never settles for $100 million, in other words, when she can put everyone through hell for a nickel more. But Close is Patty Hewes, the central character in Damages, a cloak-and-dagger legal thriller that begins Tuesday on FX. In 40 years in theater and movies, Close has appeared as Norma Desmond, Cruella de Vil and Alex Forrest, the Medusa-haired bunny boiler of Fatal Attraction.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2005
We are tepid voyeurs," Glenn Close bellows, in full Norma Desmond mode, a New York stage diva berating her acting class. "Where is your passion?" She takes her own advice in Heights, a drama set within 24 hours of the lives of artsy New Yorkers. Close is Diana Lee, a wife suffering through yet another failing marriage, with a daughter about to marry Mr. Wrong (she thinks). Close knows she has to give us something to look at because the play's not the thing - not here, anyway. It's all about life in the rarefied air of Manhattan's beautiful strivers, people with the looks, connections and possibilities to be names in New York and unhappily facing that crossroads moment.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Once upon a time - think of 1983's Twilight Zone: The Movie - filmmakers could mount "anthology films": a handful of short tales linked by (if anything) an author, a genre or a recurring character or theme. The Safety of Objects might have been more piquant if the movie's writer-director, Rose Troche, had decided to film A.M. Homes' book of suburban short stories that way. Instead, she divided the stories into their component pieces and erected a vast new Tinker Toy construction. Troche's movie interconnects the families of such distinct characters as a mother (Glenn Close)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jody Jaffe and By Jody Jaffe,Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
Jason Starr's Tough Luck (Vintage, 256 pages, $12) is for people who slow down to catch a peek at highway pileups. It's the kind of book you read with a wince, but you read it straight through because you can't put it down. Starr, a terrifically taut writer, crafts a sympathetic character and puts him on the rack. Then he cranks the tension so tight you want to reach into the pages and rescue the poor schlemiel. Mickey Prada, 18, is the schlemiel in question. He's a good kid, working at a Flatbush Avenue fish store to save money for college.
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By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2000
Tickets are still available for this evening's screening of "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her," a romantic comedy directed by Rodrigo Garcia, who received early funding from a Maryland Producers Club Filmmakers Fellowship. The director will be in town fresh from the movie's appearance at the Cannes Film Festival. "Things You Can Tell " stars Calista Flockhart, Glenn Close, Holly Hunter, Cameron Diaz, Kathy Baker and Amy Brenneman in an ensemble comedy about contemporary relationships.
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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 5, 1992
Bozeman, Mont. -- You got your Atlanta Braves owner/cable TV czar Ted Turner and his actress/fitness-guru wife Jane Fonda on the edge of town, raising buffalo. Downtown, there's a coffeehouse that you can't walk past without someone telling you it's owned by Glenn Close. You've got Gomer Pyle living up north, Batman living down south, and so many celebrities in between that you need that "Entertainment Tonight" lady to help tell your Kiefer from your Emilio. Which is OK because she lives in these parts, too.From Mary Hart to Tom Brokaw, from Charlie Sheen to Brooke Shields, the rich and famous -- not to mention hordes of fairly well-off and unknown Californians -- have been pouring into Montana as steadily as the cappuccino flows at the Leaf & Bean (it's owned by Glenn Close, you know)
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November 20, 1999
Sometimes, even in the world of network television, quality is appreciated."Sarah, Plain & Tall," that splendid turn-of-the-century story of heartland Americana starring Glenn Close and Christopher Walken, set ratings records when it premiered in 1991, becoming the most-watched Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation in the franchise's then 42-year history. With its audience of 50 million viewers, it remains the highest-rated made-for-TV movie of the decade.And, now, comes "Sarah, Plain & Tall: Winter's End," the last of three CBS films based on the Newbery Award-winning work of Patricia MacLachlan.
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