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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Gleneagles Inc., an 80-year-old clothing manufacturer, plans to close its doors by June, resulting in a loss of 300 jobs at its Towson and Bel Air operations, the company confirmed yesterday.However, company officials said they are working with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, which represents employees, to find a buyer for the operation, which primarily makes men's rainwear.Union officials were not available for comment.If no buyer is found, the company will begin dismissing workers May 1 said Richard L. Biegel, president of Gleneagles.
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NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
Ten years older than his sister Denise, Dennis Storm doted on her as they grew up. But now it is the younger Storm attempting to care for the elder, as she struggles to bring the ailing war veteran home from a hospital in Indonesia. Denise Storm was named after her brother. Her parents thought the boy would become more talkative if he had a like-named sister. The two grew extremely close. "He spoiled me rotten," she said. When Denise was in seventh grade, Dennis came back to the Storms' home in Chicago after the first of his two tours in Vietnam - with a Silver Star earned for saving eight men from a burning helicopter - and appeared in a huge assembly at Denise's school.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Business is booming at Gleneagles Bel Air clothing manufacturing plant, its owner says, and the company is considering adding up to 25 workers to meet demand."
BUSINESS
May 25, 1997
Gemcraft Homes has opened a model of the "Annapolis," one of three traditional houses the firm is building on one-third to one-quarter-acre lots at the Trails of Glen-eagles in Bel Air.Gas heat, hardwood foyers and unfinished basements are standard. The homes are being built under the BGE EnergyWi$e program.The "Annapolis" has 2,130 square feet and starts at $201,900. A 13-by-11-foot living room and 11-by-9-foot library flank the two-story foyer. Also on the first floor are a two-car garage, laundry and powder rooms, 12-by-11-foot dining room, kitchen/breakfast area with pantry, and 19-by-13-foot family room.
BUSINESS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | November 21, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., the century-old clothing manufacturer founded in Baltimore, has bought the Gleneagles manufacturing plant in Bel Air, promising to bring 125 jobs back to a plant that has been closed since June 1.In announcing the purchase yesterday, Schoeneman President James J. Stankovic said the company would begin hiring immediately, and the plant could be operating with a staff of 75 by Christmas.Schoeneman bought the Bel Air plant for an undisclosed sum. Mr. Stankovic said the plant will resume production of top-name rainwear and will eventually expand into other types of men's outerwear, including jackets and sportswear.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Gleneagles Inc., an 80-year-old clothing manufacturer, plans to close its doors by June, resulting in a loss of 300 jobs at its Towson and Bel Air operations, the company confirmed yesterday.However, company officials said they are working with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, which represents employees, to find a buyer for the operation, which primarily makes men's rainwear.The chances of selling the plant are about 50-50, said Carmen S. Papale, international vice president in the Baltimore region for the Amalgamated Clothing union.
NEWS
December 4, 1992
The resurrection of the former Gleneagles Co. menswear plant in Bel Air signals another coup for Harford County economic development. It is also a welcome expansion of clothing manufacturing in Maryland, rather than another contraction.Remarkably, the reopening of the facility by J. Schoeneman Inc. will occur without the closing of another plant and layoffs somewhere else in the state. And laid-off Gleneagles workers stand first in line for the new jobs, which are expected to pay about the same wages as the raincoat factory did.For nearly a half-century, the Gleneagles raincoat plant was a stable employer of skilled workers in Bel Air. Some 225 veteran employees were idled last June as the parent company decided to abandon the rainwear market.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
The Gleneagles clothing plant in Bel Air, quiet and dark since it shut down last summer, will be humming with the sound of sewing machines by Christmas, the plant's new owners say.The purchase, announced Friday, of the Williams Street plant by J. Schoeneman Inc. should bring at least 125 jobs back to the plant that closed June 1."People who may have had no hope before could be back to work by Christmas," said Mark Wasserman, secretary of the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development, which contributed to the reopening with a $135,000 low-interest loan.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
Ten years older than his sister Denise, Dennis Storm doted on her as they grew up. But now it is the younger Storm attempting to care for the elder, as she struggles to bring the ailing war veteran home from a hospital in Indonesia. Denise Storm was named after her brother. Her parents thought the boy would become more talkative if he had a like-named sister. The two grew extremely close. "He spoiled me rotten," she said. When Denise was in seventh grade, Dennis came back to the Storms' home in Chicago after the first of his two tours in Vietnam - with a Silver Star earned for saving eight men from a burning helicopter - and appeared in a huge assembly at Denise's school.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1997
Gemcraft Homes has opened a model of the "Annapolis," one of three traditional houses the firm is building on one-third to one-quarter-acre lots at the Trails of Glen-eagles in Bel Air.Gas heat, hardwood foyers and unfinished basements are standard. The homes are being built under the BGE EnergyWi$e program.The "Annapolis" has 2,130 square feet and starts at $201,900. A 13-by-11-foot living room and 11-by-9-foot library flank the two-story foyer. Also on the first floor are a two-car garage, laundry and powder rooms, 12-by-11-foot dining room, kitchen/breakfast area with pantry, and 19-by-13-foot family room.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Business is booming at Gleneagles Bel Air clothing manufacturing plant, its owner says, and the company is considering adding up to 25 workers to meet demand."
NEWS
December 4, 1992
The resurrection of the former Gleneagles Co. menswear plant in Bel Air signals another coup for Harford County economic development. It is also a welcome expansion of clothing manufacturing in Maryland, rather than another contraction.Remarkably, the reopening of the facility by J. Schoeneman Inc. will occur without the closing of another plant and layoffs somewhere else in the state. And laid-off Gleneagles workers stand first in line for the new jobs, which are expected to pay about the same wages as the raincoat factory did.For nearly a half-century, the Gleneagles raincoat plant was a stable employer of skilled workers in Bel Air. Some 225 veteran employees were idled last June as the parent company decided to abandon the rainwear market.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
The Gleneagles clothing plant in Bel Air, quiet and dark since it shut down last summer, will be humming with the sound of sewing machines by Christmas, the plant's new owners say.The purchase, announced Friday, of the Williams Street plant by J. Schoeneman Inc. should bring at least 125 jobs back to the plant that closed June 1."People who may have had no hope before could be back to work by Christmas," said Mark Wasserman, secretary of the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development, which contributed to the reopening with a $135,000 low-interest loan.
BUSINESS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | November 21, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., the century-old clothing manufacturer founded in Baltimore, has bought the Gleneagles manufacturing plant in Bel Air, promising to bring 125 jobs back to a plant that has been closed since June 1.In announcing the purchase yesterday, Schoeneman President James J. Stankovic said the company would begin hiring immediately, and the plant could be operating with a staff of 75 by Christmas.Schoeneman bought the Bel Air plant for an undisclosed sum. Mr. Stankovic said the plant will resume production of top-name rainwear and will eventually expand into other types of men's outerwear, including jackets and sportswear.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Gleneagles Inc., an 80-year-old clothing manufacturer, plans to close its doors by June, resulting in a loss of 300 jobs at its Towson and Bel Air operations, the company confirmed yesterday.However, company officials said they are working with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, which represents employees, to find a buyer for the operation, which primarily makes men's rainwear.The chances of selling the plant are about 50-50, said Carmen S. Papale, international vice president in the Baltimore region for the Amalgamated Clothing union.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Gleneagles Inc., an 80-year-old clothing manufacturer, plans to close its doors by June, resulting in a loss of 300 jobs at its Towson and Bel Air operations, the company confirmed yesterday.However, company officials said they are working with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, which represents employees, to find a buyer for the operation, which primarily makes men's rainwear.Union officials were not available for comment.If no buyer is found, the company will begin dismissing workers May 1 said Richard L. Biegel, president of Gleneagles.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
At least by the standard of its own recent economic development coups, Harford County was having a slow summer. A major manufacturer hadn't announced plans to open in Harford in, what, at least several months. Then last week rose two major items: B. Green, the wholesale grocery distributor, confirmed that it was negotiating to move from Lansdowne in Baltimore County to a vacant warehouse in Harford County's Perryman, which has become a magnet for distribution centers. At least as significant was the news that After Six formal wear wants to take over a garment factory in Bel Air that closed two months ago.When Gleneagles Inc. rainwear shut down in June, about 300 people lost their jobs in Bel Air and Towson.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
What's in a name?Just ask the residents and workers sandwiched between Towson and Parkville who have suffered a longtime identity crisis as to what to call the community. A neighborhood mission statement even stresses, "It must be seen as an independent area."Now, the U.S. Postal Service is aiding the cause by christening its newest branch off Cromwell Bridge Road as the Loch Raven post office, rather than designate it an offshoot of the Towson post office on Chesapeake Avenue."We thought it would reflect the community and location all in one," said Pat Mank, customer relations coordinator for the Postal Service in the Baltimore area.
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