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By Robert Haskins | February 5, 1991
The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour -- a bizarre blend of crossover country/pop music, satirical humor and the ubiquitous psychedelia of the '60s and '70s -- was one of television's grandest and most unforgettable experiments. Mr. Campbell has been on the road with a rather uneven reprise of the program -- presented last night as part of the "Meet Us at the Meyerhoff" series.While the performance lacked the best of the show's original peculiarities, the best of its music endures. Songs such as "Galveston" and "Wichita Lineman" (both by composer Jim Webb)
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
During this week 39 years ago, socialite-turned-fugitive Patricia Hearst was captured, President Gerald Ford begins wearing a bulletproof vest six days after an assassination attempt, "Jaws" was nearing the end of its run at the top of the box office, and the following songs were the most popular in America, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Feel Like Makin' Love," Bad Company Did this line work on women of the 1970s? Well, I mean, other than if it was coming from the band?
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
During this week 39 years ago, socialite-turned-fugitive Patricia Hearst was captured, President Gerald Ford begins wearing a bulletproof vest six days after an assassination attempt, "Jaws" was nearing the end of its run at the top of the box office, and the following songs were the most popular in America, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Feel Like Makin' Love," Bad Company Did this line work on women of the 1970s? Well, I mean, other than if it was coming from the band?
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN SUNG and ELLEN SUNG,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2006
Keith Urban says he doesn't know why some critics target him. He never claimed to be a country music purist. The floppy-haired country megastar, who won his first Grammy earlier this month for the woeful breakup ballad "You'll Think of Me," has drawn fire from critics of crossover country-pop who think his music strays too far from the genre's roots. "You'll Think of Me" was originally penned for Joe Cocker; the only thing country about it is the twang that Urban added. "The influences I've had in country were more contemporary influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monica Eng and Monica Eng,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
At his Malibu, Calif., home, it's a day of celebration for Glen Campbell. It's the day he gets to remove the Intoxalock from his car. "Whoever invented that thing should be hit upside the head with a crowbar -- or at least a cane or a pool cue," the country icon growls over the phone, referring to the Breathalyzer-type device linked to a car's ignition system that he had to blow into to start his car. "You know it's not even technically legal, but they...
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN SUNG and ELLEN SUNG,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2006
Keith Urban says he doesn't know why some critics target him. He never claimed to be a country music purist. The floppy-haired country megastar, who won his first Grammy earlier this month for the woeful breakup ballad "You'll Think of Me," has drawn fire from critics of crossover country-pop who think his music strays too far from the genre's roots. "You'll Think of Me" was originally penned for Joe Cocker; the only thing country about it is the twang that Urban added. "The influences I've had in country were more contemporary influences.
NEWS
By david zurawik and david zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You can go with the usual Thursday night network mainstays, like NBC's The Office or ABC's Grey's Anatomy. Nothing wrong there. But if you are looking for something different, here are a couple of music-based productions. THE ROOTS OF THE MAN IN BLACK: This look at country singer Johnny Cash and the thematic currents of his music and life is first-rate film biography from two outstanding documentary filmmakers, Robert Gordon (Muddy Waters: Can't Be Satisfied) and Morgan Neville (Hank Williams: Honky Tonk Blues)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | February 13, 2003
Just announced Pat Green will perform at the Recher Theatre in Towson Feb. 25. Call 337-7210. Comedian Dave Chappelle plays the Warner Theatre in Washington May 16. Call 410-481-SEAT. Zwan and Queens of the Stone Age perform at the Towson Center Arena March 29. Call 410-481-SEAT. George Clinton and the P-Funk All Stars will play the 9:30 Club in Washington March 8. Call 410-481-SEAT. Avril Lavigne's "Try to Shut Me Up Tour," with guests Simple Plan and Gob, makes a stop at George Mason University's Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., May 12. Call 410-481-SEAT.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
Nobody on TV does biography like PBS' American Masters - and that goes for the life history of institutions as well as individuals. Tonight, the series looks at one of Hollywood's founding motion picture studios in You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story. This three-night exploration of the film kingdom of Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack L. Warner is directed by historian Richard Schickel, and it is not to be missed. Beyond telling backstage stories about memorable films ranging from The Jazz Singer (1927)
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | March 16, 1992
Back in the mid-1960s, before "Tootsie," "Mr. Mom" and the infamous shower scene on "Late Night With David Letterman," actress Teri Garr was dancer Teri Garr.Specifically, Garr was one of a corps of professional dancers who appeared on the ABC-TV series "Shindig!" -- a half-hour, prime-time, rock 'n' roll cavalcade on which the dancers often did not so much dance as explode into frenzies of limb flailing that resembled a marionette show performed during an 8.6 Richter scale quake.It was a start.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monica Eng and Monica Eng,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
At his Malibu, Calif., home, it's a day of celebration for Glen Campbell. It's the day he gets to remove the Intoxalock from his car. "Whoever invented that thing should be hit upside the head with a crowbar -- or at least a cane or a pool cue," the country icon growls over the phone, referring to the Breathalyzer-type device linked to a car's ignition system that he had to blow into to start his car. "You know it's not even technically legal, but they...
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | February 5, 1991
The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour -- a bizarre blend of crossover country/pop music, satirical humor and the ubiquitous psychedelia of the '60s and '70s -- was one of television's grandest and most unforgettable experiments. Mr. Campbell has been on the road with a rather uneven reprise of the program -- presented last night as part of the "Meet Us at the Meyerhoff" series.While the performance lacked the best of the show's original peculiarities, the best of its music endures. Songs such as "Galveston" and "Wichita Lineman" (both by composer Jim Webb)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 3, 1992
"Rock-A-Doodle" do? I think, unless you're under the age of 10, it's more a case of "Rock-A Doodle" don't.Don Bluth's animated retelling of the Chanticleer story in pupil-splattering colors and eardrum-shattering music casts the classic story in the idiom of rock 'n' roll. Why? Why ask why?Chanticleer, that icon of deluded male vanity, has become an Elvis imitator, with a fat greasy pompadour, a white jumpsuit open to the navel and a fragile tatter of an ego. I'd vote for him on a stamp, but do I want to spend a long time in a movie theater with him?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
Sixty-two years ago, Kong, the eighth wonder of the world, made his disastrous New York debut, breaking his chains, wreaking havoc on the streets of New York and carrying Fay Wray all the way to the top of the Empire State Building before some pesky biplanes got the better of him. Big apes still don't come any better -- as proven by his disastrous return to the big screen 20 years ago. Watch TNT and see just what I'm talking about.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
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