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NEWS
August 10, 2004
William E. "Sonny" Williams, a retired glazier, died of a heart attack Aug. 3 at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Lumberton, N.C. The former Southeast Baltimore resident was 71. Born in Webster Springs, W. Va., where he attended schools, he served in the Army during the Korean War. Mr. Williams moved to Baltimore in the early 1950s and lived on Essex Street in Canton. He was a glazier at Caplan Brothers and Seidman Glass for 41 years. He retired and moved to Rowland, N.C., in 1991.
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NEWS
August 10, 2004
William E. "Sonny" Williams, a retired glazier, died of a heart attack Aug. 3 at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Lumberton, N.C. The former Southeast Baltimore resident was 71. Born in Webster Springs, W. Va., where he attended schools, he served in the Army during the Korean War. Mr. Williams moved to Baltimore in the early 1950s and lived on Essex Street in Canton. He was a glazier at Caplan Brothers and Seidman Glass for 41 years. He retired and moved to Rowland, N.C., in 1991.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Sandy Banisky and Kate Shatzkin and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writers | December 30, 1994
Linda Sue Glazier realized a dream last night that she had thought impossible -- release from the women's prison in Jessup that had been her home since she was convicted in the murders of her adoptive parents 20 years ago.Ms. Glazier was released after Gov. William Donald Schaefer commuted her two life sentences, accepting her argument that abuse as a child led to her role in the murders.With her long, gray hair swept back in a headband, and clutching a small television set one of her lawyers had given her to pass the time, Ms. Glazier emerged from prison at about 7:20 p.m. and fell into the arms of a loyal cadre of friends and advocates who had long awaited the moment.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The $130 million Four Seasons hotel and residence project, billed as an "urban resort," at Harbor East received preliminary approval from the city's design panel yesterday, opening the way for construction to start. Plans are to break ground by the end of summer and to open as early as 2006. Members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel praised the work done by Hill Glazier Architects of Palo Alto, Calif., in simplifying the design of the project, which is to feature 200 hotel rooms, 26 to 28 condominiums, spa facilities and retail space.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
After 20 years in prison, this is how freedom feels to Linda Sue Glazier:Wide-open spaces both beckon and frighten. Purses are strange appendages. There are too many cars on the highways, always coming too close. The silence is very, very loud.Ms. Glazier had just turned 18 when she was arrested for participating in the murders of her adoptive parents, William and Dorothy Glazier of Cambridge. When she was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life terms, she never thought she would walk the streets again.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | November 20, 1993
After 18 years in prison for the murder of parents she says abused her, Linda Sue Glazier will have a chance to plead her case at a parole hearing in January, the governor's office said yesterday.Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday announced that he has shortened her sentence from two consecutive life terms to concurrent life terms. The change means Glazier, 37, is eligible for parole now instead of having to wait several more years for a hearing."The governor weighed the evidence of abuse in her childhood, and he was moved by it," said Page W. Boinest, Mr. Schaefer's spokeswoman.
NEWS
April 21, 1994
Linda Sue Glazier, who has spent 19 years in prison for the 1974 murders of the adoptive parents she alleges abused her, yesterday lost her bid for a speedy parole as the Parole Commission delayed her release until at least January 1999.Her lawyers last year had appealed to Gov. William Donald Schaefer for clemency, the first such request here based on a claim of sexual and physical child abuse.In November, Mr. Schaefer had reduced her sentence from two consecutive life terms to concurrent life terms.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
In September 1974, the well-to-do and well-respected William and Dorothy Glazier were killed in their bed in Cambridge, blasted with a shotgun. Now their adopted daughter, who was convicted with her boyfriend of their murders, is seeking clemency, the first such request in Maryland based on a claim of sexual and physical child abuse.If the crime occurred today, her lawyers contend, the court would hear Linda Sue Glazier's account of a lifetime of mistreatment -- beginning in her mother's home in Florida, continuing in an adoptive home in New Jersey and ending with beatings and rapes from the time she was 12 in the Glaziers' waterfront home in Cambridge.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | August 15, 1993
An Odenton church is working to free convicted murderer Linda Sue Glazier by raising money, pledging to serve as a surrogate family and urging clemency based on a claim of sexual and physical child abuse.When Glazier is released from prison, says the Rev. Phebe Coe, priest at Epiphany Episcopal Church, $1,000 will be in a bank account waiting for her.Ms. Coe doesn't say if."Linda doesn't belong in prison. My impression is that everybody is in agreement on that," said Ms. Coe. "Our hope is that the governor will recognize it's time for her to be out."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
The turmoil in East Africa reached the Mount Airy office of International Christian Aid this month when one of the organization's relief workers was found slain near the city of Ame in the Sudan.The body of the victim, Vilma Gomez, a 39-year-old registered nurse from the Philippines, was found Oct. 1.Word of the incident did not reach agency officials until eight days later. They announced it yesterday.Ms. Gomez had been traveling with two members of UNICEF and a Norwegian journalist, who also were killed.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Anne Carlsen, 87, who was born without hands or feet and gained national acclaim as a teacher of handicapped children, died Sunday in Jamestown, N.D. She was a teacher, principal and administrator for more than 40 years at the Jamestown school that now bears her name. Former Gov. William Guy awarded her the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Award, which is North Dakota's highest honor, in 1966. Ms. Carlsen was the youngest of six children. Her mother died when she was 4 and her father became the guiding influence in her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynnley Browning and Lynnley Browning,BOSTON GLOBE | January 10, 2000
Who is the new icon of America's obsession with investing? Is it "Stuart," the frenetic 20-something with spiky orange hair who hypes an Internet brokerage to his boss? Or is it Shelly Glazier, a 64-year-old medical office administrator who spends an hour each night poring over her portfolio, trading stocks online just several times a year? "Stuart," the wild-maned star of a television advertising blitz by Ameritrade, a Web brokerage, might cast the country as a nation of gamblers. But it is real people such as Glazier who are fueling a revolution in how Americans manage their money in the digital era. In a pivotal shift, experts expect older citizens with sizable income and middle-class folk with careful savings habits to constitute the bulk of Web investors in the coming years.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
MARBURY -- Storms and high water levels have changed the fishing conditions of the upper tidal Potomac River, where the Bassmaster Maryland Top 100 pro-am tournament is being fished through tomorrow. But, according to the pros who are leading the field, the big bass are still there for the taking."It's tougher than the last time we were here," said Kevin VanDam, the Kalamazoo, Mich., pro who weighed in five bass yesterday for 18 pounds, 13 ounces and the lead after the first day of competition.
NEWS
July 5, 1995
Why schools must impose disciplineI read with interest the letter June 27 by David Glazier, "Policy doesn't make sense to suspended teen." I can see why Baltimore County's discipline policy does not make sense to him.First, Mr. Glazier left the school grounds to go home during the middle of the day to complete a homework assignment due the next period. Doesn't he realize homework is to be completed at home during non-school hours?The assignment should have been completed at home the night before it was due. You do not take "time off" during the school day to complete homework.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
After 20 years in prison, this is how freedom feels to Linda Sue Glazier:Wide-open spaces both beckon and frighten. Purses are strange appendages. There are too many cars on the highways, always coming too close. The silence is very, very loud.Ms. Glazier had just turned 18 when she was arrested for participating in the murders of her adoptive parents, William and Dorothy Glazier of Cambridge. When she was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life terms, she never thought she would walk the streets again.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Sandy Banisky and Kate Shatzkin and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writers | December 30, 1994
Linda Sue Glazier realized a dream last night that she had thought impossible -- release from the women's prison in Jessup that had been her home since she was convicted in the murders of her adoptive parents 20 years ago.Ms. Glazier was released after Gov. William Donald Schaefer commuted her two life sentences, accepting her argument that abuse as a child led to her role in the murders.With her long, gray hair swept back in a headband, and clutching a small television set one of her lawyers had given her to pass the time, Ms. Glazier emerged from prison at about 7:20 p.m. and fell into the arms of a loyal cadre of friends and advocates who had long awaited the moment.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | September 9, 1992
MOUNT AIRY -- You'd never know that Derby Hill Farm used to be -- in the words of its owner Bill Holmes -- "a run-down cow farm."The view from Holmes' favorite spot high above the 80-acre facility on Cabbage Spring Road near Mount Airy, one of the highlights of last weekend's Maryland Million Horse Country Tour, shows lovingly tended grassy green slopes with well-cared-for horses peaceably grazing and playing.Looking out to your right you see the Irish-bred Providential, winner of the D.C. International in the early '80s, strutting his stuff for the band of yearling fillies in the paddock across the lane.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
Trainer Billy Boniface thinks he might have a Triple Crown contender in his barn.Yesterday, after the Boniface-trained Oliver's Twist won his third straight start by 5 3/4 lengths in the $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship at Laurel Park, Boniface said he will ship the horse to Florida and prepare to run him Feb. 18 in the Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park. In that race, he is expected to meet another Maryland-based runner, Laurel Futurity winner Western Echo."This is the best prospect I've had in the barn since 1983," Boniface said, referring to the year that he won the Preakness with Deputed Testamony.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
Trainer Billy Boniface thinks he might have a Triple Crown contender in his barn.Yesterday, after the Boniface-trained Oliver's Twist won his third straight start by 5 3/4 lengths in the $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship at Laurel Park, Boniface said he will ship the horse to Florida and prepare to run him Feb. 18 in the Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park. In that race, he is expected to meet another Maryland-based runner, Laurel Futurity winner Western Echo."This is the best prospect I've had in the barn since 1983," Boniface said, referring to the year that he won the Preakness with Deputed Testamony.
NEWS
April 27, 1994
Raymond A. DivverRetired glazierRaymond A. Divver, a retired glazier who owned a business in Gambrills, died Saturday at a hospital in Charleston, S.C., after he suffered a heart attack while returning from a trip to Florida. He was 67 and lived in Edgewater.He retired in 1989 after operating his business for 20 years. Earlier, he worked for the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. and for contractors.The Washington native graduated from Gonzaga High School there. He served in the Navy in the Atlantic during World War II and lived in Prince George's County before moving to Edgewater 30 years ago.His first wife, Naomi Divver, died in 1989.
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