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NEWS
July 19, 2011
On July 10th there was a front page article titled "CEO pay on the rise," and top CEOs of Maryland publically traded companies were pictured. Surprisingly, the article and subsequent editorials missed a glaring omission: all 19 of the highly paid CEOs are men. Where are the women? Network 2000 has done extensive research on women in the C-Suite and we have to ask, how is it possible that of the 86 publically traded companies in Maryland only two have women CEOs when: •Women make up 46.7 percent of the U.S. labor force; •Women earn more bachelor's and doctorate degrees than men and more than twice the amount of master's degrees than men; •Seventy-five percent of all new businesses being opened are being opened by women; and, •Women account for 85 percent of all buying decisions?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | June 21, 2012
If Mitt Romney wins the presidential election this fall, he'll have Harry Reid partly to thank. The Republican presidential nominee and the Senate Democratic leader don't have much in common politically. But they're both members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - that is, they're both Mormons. So whenever officials of the LDS church are asked about the once-common concern that a Mormon president might take orders from Salt Lake City, they have a ready answer: Just look at Harry Reid.
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NEWS
March 24, 1995
Progressive-minded viewers of the popular "Star Trek" series probably thought nothing of it when the latest Gene Roddenberry spin-off, "Star Trek: Voyager," debuted earlier this year with Kate Mulgrew in the role of Capt. Kathryn Janeway, the first female captain of a star ship. Ms. Mulgrew barked orders, faced down danger and reflected on the meaning of life with a gravity that would have made her male predecessors, Captains James T. Kirk and Jean-Luc Picard, proud.Alas, given the current pace of women's progress into the upper reaches of corporate management, it may well be the 24th century before a woman at the top becomes commonplace.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
On July 10th there was a front page article titled "CEO pay on the rise," and top CEOs of Maryland publically traded companies were pictured. Surprisingly, the article and subsequent editorials missed a glaring omission: all 19 of the highly paid CEOs are men. Where are the women? Network 2000 has done extensive research on women in the C-Suite and we have to ask, how is it possible that of the 86 publically traded companies in Maryland only two have women CEOs when: •Women make up 46.7 percent of the U.S. labor force; •Women earn more bachelor's and doctorate degrees than men and more than twice the amount of master's degrees than men; •Seventy-five percent of all new businesses being opened are being opened by women; and, •Women account for 85 percent of all buying decisions?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 13, 1991
SHATTERING the "glass ceiling" in corporate America should be even more of a national priority now that an authoritative Bush administration study has shown that women and minorities face barriers in their careers at a far earlier stage than previously believed.The Department of Labor study disclosed that women and minorities are blocked by subtle corporate practices at much lower management levels than heretofore thought. And the careers of minorities were found to plateau much earlier than those of white women, according to Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin.
FEATURES
By Lini S. Kadaba and Lini S. Kadaba,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 8, 1993
Working Woman magazine is out this month with its eighth annual report, hyping the "25 hottest careers" for women. Just how hot are they?Not very, according to the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE), which last month issued an eye-opening report on the status of women in the workplace.The jobs cited by Working Woman include computer programmer, telecommunications manager, employee trainer, family physician, nurse practitioner, physical therapist, diversity manager, ombudsman, environmental consultant, private investigator and professional-temp placement.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | August 12, 1991
IT SHOULD come as no surprise to anyone that women and minorities are not advancing up the rungs of power that lead to high-profile corporate jobs and BMWs. A visit to any company, or any kind of business operation for that matter, will make it abundantly clear. Black and female and Hispanic faces are certainly visible everywhere now -- and often in locations they had not been a generation ago. But as a society we have become complacent with too little progress -- as if to say: "We let you go to law school and medical school and we let you get your MBA. What more do you want?"
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A "glass ceiling" in the federal government is preventing women and minorities from being promoted to high-level, high-paying jobs, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is not doing enough to shatter it, congressional investigators and civil rights groups have charged.The term glass ceiling "has come to describe the existence of invisible, yet insurmountable barriers which thwart the advancement opportunities of women and minorities in the workplace," Jean Christiansen, president of Federally Employed Women, recently told the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
By Beth Hawkins and Beth Hawkins,Los Angeles Times | August 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Women and members of minority groups are being excluded from the corporate "pipelines" that lead to managerial and executive positions, according to the first major government study of the so-called "glass ceiling.""The time has come to tear down, to dismantle, to remove and to shatter the glass ceiling," said Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin at a news con ference yesterday to introduce the Department of Labor study.The barrier to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder exists at a much lower level than was previously believed, she said, and the careers of minorities reach a plateau earlier than those of women.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | October 21, 1990
CHICAGO -- The nation's top economists and women's rights advocates have spelled out many times the reasons full-time women workers make only 68 cents for every dollar earned by men.They say women are paid less because they are segregated into lower-paying jobs in disproportionate numbers. And even women top professional occupations, such as doctors, lawyers and business executives, make less than their male counterparts on the same level.But now another factor to be considered about women's wages is the "glass ceiling," which keeps qualified women from being promoted beyond a certain level.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 25, 2010
There are 180,000 more women living in Maryland than men, according to the Census Bureau. Women far surpass men in enrollment and graduation from Maryland universities, and they tend to get better grades. Baltimore has its second woman mayor. Women Legislators of Maryland, founded in the 1960s, was the first women's legislative caucus in the country. Nearly one legislator in three in Annapolis is female, the ninth-highest proportion in the country. If Maryland's Barbara Mikulski is re-elected this year, she'll be the longest-serving woman in the history of the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,rona.marech@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
With her pearl earrings, spotless house and unfailingly friendly manner, Andrea Johnson doesn't seem - at first glance - to fit the description of a revolutionary. The 61-year-old lives in Annapolis with her husband, a retired Navy captain, and her aging dog. The mother of three grown children, she is retired from a job as a program officer at the Fulbright Program. She's a devout Catholic who doesn't especially relish making waves. But for decades, Johnson has felt that something was amiss in the Roman Catholic Church - that the exclusion of women from the priesthood was unfair and self-defeating.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 1, 2008
LOUISVILLE, Ky.-- --From the dawn of time - when Adam forgot to put the seat down back behind the Tree of Knowledge - the battle of the sexes is a rivalry that has played out over and over. Joan of Arc, Gloria Steinem, Billie Jean King, Hillary Clinton, Danica Patrick. And now, galloping in their trailblazing footsteps is a beautiful 3-year-old girl named Eight Belles. On Saturday, the filly will take on a field of 19 boys in the Kentucky Derby. You should see her - tall, proud, sturdy.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 22, 2008
If you know a young woman who is about to graduate from college or who has just started working, you ought to buy her a copy of Skirt! Rules for the Workplace: An Irreverent Guide to Advancing Your Career, by Kelly Love Johnson. It is advice on how to work smarter, faster, tougher and better than any guy - or any other woman - and get ahead. Johnson is the managing editor of the unfortunately titled Skirt magazine (Why not call it Dame or Doll magazine?) and she uses her own up-from-the-freelance-pool story to illustrate her tips.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 9, 2006
BOSTON -- Let me begin the New Year by taking my (party) hat off to Terry Hekker. Here's to an elder with the courage to offer her life story as a cautionary tale. I don't remember the column Ms. Hekker wrote a quarter-century ago in The New York Times on the satisfactions of being a housewife and mother in an age of "do-your-own-thing." Nor do I remember the book that morphed from that piece, winning her media attention and lecture audiences. But on this New Year's Day, the mother of five was back in the same paper, updating her life.
NEWS
By Rachael Worby | July 29, 2005
I DON'T know that I can even remember the first time someone asked me what it was like to be a "woman conductor," but I can remember being a bit curious about the question. True, I am a conductor and a woman, but putting the two descriptions together rarely entered my consciousness. I do remember very clearly, though, sometime in the late 1970s, attending a screening of Judy Collins' documentary tribute to her friend and mentor, conductor Antonia Brico, who died in 1989 at 87, and thinking, "It must have been tough in the old days."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 17, 1995
Despite almost three decades of affirmative action, the glass ceiling is still an impenetrable barrier to the advancement of women and minorities, a Labor Department report says.Although women and minorities make up two-thirds of the nation's working population, the corporate hierarchy is overwhelmingly male and white, according to a federal Glass Ceiling Commission report released Wednesday.The bipartisan commission reported that 97 percent of the senior managers at 1,500 industrial Fortune 1000 and Fortune 500 corporations are white and almost all of them are men. Only 5 percent of all Fortune 2000 industrial and service company managers are women, and virtually all are white, the report said.
TOPIC
By Holly Sklar and Holly Sklar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2004
Many women have celebrated Mother's Day in the president's house, but none of them was president. We've had two John Adamses and two George Bushes as president, but no Abigail or Barbara, Victoria, Margaret, Shirley or Elizabeth. Women have been presidents and prime ministers of various countries - Great Britain, Ireland, India, Israel, Pakistan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Nicaragua, Norway, Finland, Guyana and Sri Lanka among them. But not the United States. Women are 51 percent of the U.S. population, but just 14 percent of Congress.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 8, 2001
NEW ORLEANS - As the son of the city's first African-American mayor, Marc H. Morial sought to make his own mark when he took over New Orleans' top political post in 1994. His most notable act was hiring as police chief a reformer who reined in a department notorious for corruption and violent behavior and put more cops on the street, cutting violent crime by 40 percent. Working with the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which elected him president in June, Morial became a leading national advocate for reclaiming old industrial sites and rebuilding blighted neighborhoods.
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