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By ROGER SIMON | July 17, 1991
It was a classic turning point in history. Two people meet in a room for two hours. Afterward, a war is launched.A half-million Americans go to battle, billions are spent, tens of thousands of people die.So what happened in that room? What really happened in that two-hour meeting last year between Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and American Ambassador April Glaspie?We are just now finding out the truth of it. Secret cables have been released. Charges are flying. Defenses are being readied.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
A Baltimore man -- who has tested positive for the AIDS virus -- was charged with first-degree assault after allegedly biting a security guard during a struggle at a Target Store in Frederick.Eric Orlando Glaspie, 20, of the 5000 block of Goodnow Road was charged with various counts of theft and assault. He voluntarily gave a blood sample and tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, said Deputy 1st Class Rick Winer.Frederick County Sheriff's Office officials said Glaspie went to the Target in the 5400 block of Urbana Pike at about 3: 30 p.m. Friday and presented an altered check to the clerk.
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NEWS
March 25, 1991
There is no disguising the fact that the United States failed to convey in unmistakable terms to Saddam Hussein that he would have a war on his hands if he tried to take over Kuwait. For more than a decade, until the Persian Gulf crisis exploded last August 2, three successive administrations tried to placate the Iraqi dictator as a means of striking a blow at the fiercely anti-American fundamentalist regime in Iran. Only when it was too late, did Washington learn the grim truth that the enemy of our enemy was by no means our friend.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 25, 1992
One of the services performed by Ross Perot last week wa to reintroduce the name April Glaspie to the American public.When Perot mentioned her in the final presidential debate in East Lansing, Mich., no doubt a fair number of citizens scratched their heads and tried to remember just who she was.They should not blame themselves.Glaspie was a reasonably obscure diplomat -- except for one brief shining moment when she changed the course of world history.April Glaspie was our ambassador to Iraq in 1990, though two years had passed without her ever having a private meeting with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 22, 1991
THE REPUTATION of April C. Glaspie, the United States ambassador to Iraq, is on the way to being rehabilitated. But there are still no answers to the central question about the diplomatic events that led to the war in the Persian Gulf -- whether the policies set by President Bush and Secretary of State James A. Baker encouraged Saddam Hussein to draw mistaken inferences that led to the war.Glaspie appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after...
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 25, 1992
One of the services performed by Ross Perot last week wa to reintroduce the name April Glaspie to the American public.When Perot mentioned her in the final presidential debate in East Lansing, Mich., no doubt a fair number of citizens scratched their heads and tried to remember just who she was.They should not blame themselves.Glaspie was a reasonably obscure diplomat -- except for one brief shining moment when she changed the course of world history.April Glaspie was our ambassador to Iraq in 1990, though two years had passed without her ever having a private meeting with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
A Baltimore man -- who has tested positive for the AIDS virus -- was charged with first-degree assault after allegedly biting a security guard during a struggle at a Target Store in Frederick.Eric Orlando Glaspie, 20, of the 5000 block of Goodnow Road was charged with various counts of theft and assault. He voluntarily gave a blood sample and tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, said Deputy 1st Class Rick Winer.Frederick County Sheriff's Office officials said Glaspie went to the Target in the 5400 block of Urbana Pike at about 3: 30 p.m. Friday and presented an altered check to the clerk.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Major senators yesterday accused th former U.S. ambassador to Iraq of misleading Congress in March when she testified about a crucial meeting with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein shortly before he invaded Kuwait.The senators' remarks came after they reviewed several secret cables, particularly one from Ambassador April C. Glaspie summarizing the meeting. The cables were provided by the State Department to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee this week.The legislators say that in contrast to the tough approach Ms. Glaspie described at Capitol hearings, the cables show her taking a more conciliatory tone with Mr. Hussein.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | March 26, 1991
The Glaspie affair was murkier after April Glaspie's congressional appearance than before.For seven months, Congress had waited to find out from our ambassador to Iraq what went wrong before the invasion of Kuwait. The State Department had kept her under wraps during that time. Secretary of State James Baker distanced himself from her with the comment that the instructions she was following, whatever they were, were just part of a heavy cable load for him.It looked as if there were something to hide.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- April C. Glaspie, the U.S. ambassador who met with Saddam Hussein eight days before Iraq invaded Kuwait, broke an eight-month silence yesterday, saying that the Iraqi president assured her he would not attack Kuwait after she sternly warned him that the United States "would defend our vital interests, we would support the right of self-defense of our friends in the [Persian] Gulf."Her account before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee contradicted a purported transcript of the meeting released by the Iraqi government in September quoting Ms. Glaspie as telling Mr. Hussein that the United States had "no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 17, 1991
It was a classic turning point in history. Two people meet in a room for two hours. Afterward, a war is launched.A half-million Americans go to battle, billions are spent, tens of thousands of people die.So what happened in that room? What really happened in that two-hour meeting last year between Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and American Ambassador April Glaspie?We are just now finding out the truth of it. Secret cables have been released. Charges are flying. Defenses are being readied.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Major senators accused the former U.S ambassador to Iraq yesterday of misleading Congress in March when she testified about a crucial meeting with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein shortly before he invaded Kuwait.The senators' remarks came after they reviewed several secret cables, particularly one from the ambassador, April C. Glaspie, summarizing the meeting. The cables were provided by the State Department to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee this week.The legislators say that in contrast to the tough approach Ms. Glaspie described at Capitol hearings, the cables show her taking a more conciliatory tone with Mr. Hussein.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | March 26, 1991
The Glaspie affair was murkier after April Glaspie's congressional appearance than before.For seven months, Congress had waited to find out from our ambassador to Iraq what went wrong before the invasion of Kuwait. The State Department had kept her under wraps during that time. Secretary of State James Baker distanced himself from her with the comment that the instructions she was following, whatever they were, were just part of a heavy cable load for him.It looked as if there were something to hide.
NEWS
March 25, 1991
There is no disguising the fact that the United States failed to convey in unmistakable terms to Saddam Hussein that he would have a war on his hands if he tried to take over Kuwait. For more than a decade, until the Persian Gulf crisis exploded last August 2, three successive administrations tried to placate the Iraqi dictator as a means of striking a blow at the fiercely anti-American fundamentalist regime in Iran. Only when it was too late, did Washington learn the grim truth that the enemy of our enemy was by no means our friend.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 22, 1991
THE REPUTATION of April C. Glaspie, the United States ambassador to Iraq, is on the way to being rehabilitated. But there are still no answers to the central question about the diplomatic events that led to the war in the Persian Gulf -- whether the policies set by President Bush and Secretary of State James A. Baker encouraged Saddam Hussein to draw mistaken inferences that led to the war.Glaspie appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after...
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- April C. Glaspie, the U.S. ambassador who met with Saddam Hussein eight days before Iraq invaded Kuwait, broke an eight-month silence yesterday, saying that the Iraqi president assured her he would not attack Kuwait after she sternly warned him that the United States "would defend our vital interests, we would support the right of self-defense of our friends in the [Persian] Gulf."Her account before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee contradicted a purported transcript of the meeting released by the Iraqi government in September quoting Ms. Glaspie as telling Mr. Hussein that the United States had "no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait."
NEWS
By William Safire | September 18, 1990
HERE ARE three officials who ought to be looking for new jobs:1. The chief legal counsel in the Mossad has just made an oxymoron out of "Israeli intelligence" and deserves to be fired.A disgruntled young man, after 14 months as a cadet in the Mossad, vents his spleen in a book that may endanger agents' lives, making wild charges that Israel could have WilliamSafiredone more to warn U.S. forces in Lebanon to beware of terrorists.The sensible reaction would be to protect vulnerable sources and ignore or dismiss the book as the work of a malcontent.
NEWS
By TRB | October 18, 1990
Washington. "ON APRIL 1, 1982, after making several overlooked threats, Argentina invaded the British-ruled Falkland Islands. While nobody can be sure of the circumstances in which Argentina might have desisted. . .,'' writes Margaret Thatcher's biographer Hugo Young, ''what is incontestable is that British policy offered no deterrent to her doing so.''Four days later Mrs. Thatcher's foreign minister, Lord Carrington, resigned along with two deputies. Why? ''Ministerial responsibility. I have been responsible for the policy.
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