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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
What can you do about smelly feet and armpits? Lots, including washing a lot and keeping these areas as dry and cool as possible. As you may have noticed, sweat, which helps regulate body temperature, smells different in different parts of the body. That's because the skin contains different kinds of glands. The more common are the eccrine glands, which pump out salty water (sweat). Sweaty feet smell bad because of bacteria that feed off this sweat and dead skin, said Dr. Robert Stern, chief of dermatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
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NEWS
By a Sun Staff reporter | August 21, 2014
Towson University President Maravene Loeschke is taking a leave of absence through the end of the year because of "health and personal challenges," she wrote in a letter to the university community Thursday. She had announced in April that she was diagnosed with cancer of the adrenal gland but expected to make a full recovery. She said at the time that the cancer was found early and that she had surgery and would undergo radiation therapy. University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. "Brit" Kirwan approved the leave, which was effective immediately.
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NEWS
March 21, 2001
Do you know? Do rock hyrax live in families or alone? Answer: Rock hyrax live in large family groups that often huddle together to keep warm. Learn more! Visit the rock hyrax at the Baltimore Zoo. 1. Rock hyrax have rubbery pads containing sweat glands on the bottom of their feet. 2. When running, the glands on the feet sweat, which helps the rock hyrax climb.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Professional baseball great Tony Gwynn Sr., also known as Mr. Padre, died last month of salivary gland cancer, which he believed was caused by years of using smokeless chewing tobacco. The cancer is a rare form that begins in any of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat. Two adults in 100,000 are diagnosed with salivary gland cancer each year. The chances of survival drop if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Dr. Patrick K. Ha, with Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says new types of treatments and therapies are in the works to treat the disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 1997
My teen-age daughter has acne that has gotten worse despite various diets and the vigorous use of different soaps.She is obviously troubled by the condition but has been reluctant to see a doctor.Are there useful treatments that would make it worthwhile for her to go to a doctor?Acne is the most common skin problem, occurring in about 80 percent of people at some time. Although most frequent between ages 11 and 30, acne can persist for many years. It should not be taken lightly because acne can cause permanent scarring and emotional problems.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Saliva is a humdrum liquid, the stuff of giggles, dribbles and schoolyard grossness. It's hardly something to take seriously -- until, that is, you lack it. When your glands no longer pump out a normal and robust 2 to 3 pints daily, then you'll come to appreciate spit for the wondrous substance it is, one that does far more than render food slimy and digestible. Saliva, science has revealed, is much more than water. It is packed with proteins that help control the teeming hordes of microbes in our mouths.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | September 23, 1997
Brian Dube was 14 when severe acne first struck."It was pretty bad," says Dube of his initiation into the blotchy hell that virtually all teen-agers experience to some degree just before and during puberty. But a five-month course of the potent drug Accutane worked miracles."My face was very, very clear" for years, says Dube, a college student who is working as a mental health counselor.Then, this year, his acne flared again. For a young man of 24 who prides himself on being "pretty well-dressed," it's distressing, he says, to wind up again with "ugly things on your face."
NEWS
By Judy Hevrdejs and Judy Hevrdejs,Chicago Tribune | July 11, 2004
Jonathan Hague and Judy Rahn think a lot about sweat. The sign in front of their beige brick office building in Rolling Meadows, Ill., reads simply: "Global Technology Center." It could just as well read: "Body Odor Analysis and Improvement, World Headquarters." It is here where their employer, Unilever -- the Anglo-Dutch consumer products colossus that makes such things as Q-Tips and Lipton Tea -- researches, develops and tests its antiperspirants and deodorants Degree, Dove, Axe and Suave.
NEWS
By USHA NELLORE | June 14, 1995
"Promote Wellness'' -- that is what insurance companies want doctors to do. Basically, that means doctors should practice preventive medicine, teach their patients to stop smoking and drinking, to exercise and to eat nutritious foods.But doctors should also encourage patients to think ''wellness'' rather than ''illness.'' This is a Herculean task, and doctors run up against many brick walls when they attempt to plant the seeds of wellness in their patients' minds.Not too long ago, I, an endocrinologist, saw patient Mrs. M in the hospital.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 24, 1991
LAUREL -- Ron Cartwright gestured toward Mymet helplessly. As the filly walked slowly around the Laurel Race Course paddock, big sweat beads dripped steadily off her barrel."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
Jason Rasgon wants to assure the world of one thing: His genetically modified mosquitoes do not have eyes that glow in the dark. Yes, under fluorescent bulbs, some of the mosquitoes at the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute will glow a bright red or green. When magnified, they look like space aliens. But Rasgon and colleagues say it's what you can't see that makes these bugs important: They're prototypes for a generation of genetically modified mosquitoes that could be released into the wild to help eradicate malaria.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
What can you do about smelly feet and armpits? Lots, including washing a lot and keeping these areas as dry and cool as possible. As you may have noticed, sweat, which helps regulate body temperature, smells different in different parts of the body. That's because the skin contains different kinds of glands. The more common are the eccrine glands, which pump out salty water (sweat). Sweaty feet smell bad because of bacteria that feed off this sweat and dead skin, said Dr. Robert Stern, chief of dermatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
Coppin State men's basketball coach Fang Mitchell announced yesterday that his thymus gland was removed nine days ago during major surgery, and he will continue to conduct his athletic director duties from home until the doctors clear him to return to work. The thymus gland, in the chest near the top of the breastbone, is closely related to the immune system, helping white blood cells recognize and destroy invading bacteria, virus, abnormal cell growth such as cancer, and foreign tissue.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
Eager to combat life-threatening diseases from cancer to cholera, scientists have unraveled the genetic blueprints of some of the nastiest bugs that plague the human race. Now German researchers say they have the genetic code of a microbe that won't kill anybody but contributes to one of the great torments of adolescence. Reporting in the journal Science, the researchers describe the genome of the bacterium, Propionibacterium acnes. Not always an evildoer, the bug sits on the surface of everyone's skin.
NEWS
By Judy Hevrdejs and Judy Hevrdejs,Chicago Tribune | July 11, 2004
Jonathan Hague and Judy Rahn think a lot about sweat. The sign in front of their beige brick office building in Rolling Meadows, Ill., reads simply: "Global Technology Center." It could just as well read: "Body Odor Analysis and Improvement, World Headquarters." It is here where their employer, Unilever -- the Anglo-Dutch consumer products colossus that makes such things as Q-Tips and Lipton Tea -- researches, develops and tests its antiperspirants and deodorants Degree, Dove, Axe and Suave.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Saliva is a humdrum liquid, the stuff of giggles, dribbles and schoolyard grossness. It's hardly something to take seriously -- until, that is, you lack it. When your glands no longer pump out a normal and robust 2 to 3 pints daily, then you'll come to appreciate spit for the wondrous substance it is, one that does far more than render food slimy and digestible. Saliva, science has revealed, is much more than water. It is packed with proteins that help control the teeming hordes of microbes in our mouths.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 27, 1992
(Mike Royko is on vacation this week. The following column was selected from among his favorites. It was originally published in June 1983.)Everybody at the bar was staring at the TV set. Somebody on the screen was lining up a putt. An announcer with a British accent was explaining the great importance of the ball rolling into the hole.Just then a gravelly voice from the end of the bar said: "Why don't you switch channels? Let's see what else is on."It was Fat Harry."What are you talking about, Harry?"
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
Eager to combat life-threatening diseases from cancer to cholera, scientists have unraveled the genetic blueprints of some of the nastiest bugs that plague the human race. Now German researchers say they have the genetic code of a microbe that won't kill anybody but contributes to one of the great torments of adolescence. Reporting in the journal Science, the researchers describe the genome of the bacterium, Propionibacterium acnes. Not always an evildoer, the bug sits on the surface of everyone's skin.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 10, 2001
Osmosis Jones wants to be the next Who Framed Roger Rabbit. But this combination of live-action slapstick and animated comedy is bizarrely erratic. It's like a decrepit subway with a blind conductor powered by a supercharged third rail. Bill Murray heads the live-action segments as a toxic couch potato. In the animated portions - which take place on a molecular level - Chris Rock provides the voice for a maverick white blood cell, the biological big-mouth who saves his life. The good stuff (and there is plenty)
NEWS
March 21, 2001
Do you know? Do rock hyrax live in families or alone? Answer: Rock hyrax live in large family groups that often huddle together to keep warm. Learn more! Visit the rock hyrax at the Baltimore Zoo. 1. Rock hyrax have rubbery pads containing sweat glands on the bottom of their feet. 2. When running, the glands on the feet sweat, which helps the rock hyrax climb.
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