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Glacier National Park

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TRAVEL
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff | December 26, 1999
High up the trail to Grinnel Glacier, at the sharp edge of the Continental Divide, I spotted a group of hikers clustered on a slab of rock, pointing and peering through binoculars with a mixture of exhilaration and apprehension. I rounded the bend and stopped short. I turned to my wife, Brigid, who was crossing a snowfield below, and began waving my arms over my head. "There's a bear about 100 yards above you," I mouthed. A grizzly bear! Liam, our 10-month-old son, bundled on my back, placidly sucked the pacifier I'd tied with a leather shoelace to his backpack, blissfully unaware that I was mentally calculating how fast I could rip off the backpack and roll into a ball with him in the middle and play dead.
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NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
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TRAVEL
November 29, 2009
We live in Annapolis and my wife Laurie's dream vacation has been to go to Montana. We've been to the Caribbean, Europe and had lots of great vacations, but our trip to Glacier National Park and Yellowstone was nothing short of amazing. At Glacier we took a one-hour helicopter ride up to the Canadian border. It was really windy and the ride was pretty hairy. My wife sat up front with the pilot and every time the helicopter dropped due to a wind shear she grabbed the pilot's leg. Despite the occasional terror, the scenery was amazing, including this photo of one of the lakes in Glacier National Park.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
BILLINGS, Mont. - Glacier National Park has lost two more of its namesake moving ice fields to climate change, which is shrinking the rivers of ice until they grind to a halt, the U.S. Geological Survey said Wednesday. Higher temperatures have reduced the number of named glaciers in the northwestern Montana park to 25, said Dan Fagre, an ecologist with the agency. He warned the rest of the glaciers might be gone by decade's end. "When we're measuring glacier margins, by the time we go home the glacier is already smaller than what we've measured," Fagre said.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Two Virginia veterinarians reported missing while hiking in Glacier National Park were found alive Monday, elated family members and park officials said. "Initial information indicates they are well and will be returning to their families! Yeah!" announced a post on the park's Facebook page, referring to Jason Hiser of Richmond, Va., and Neal Peckens of Herndon, Va. The two had been reported missing by their families Friday after failing to catch a flight home. Rescue teams located the men after as many as 50 people laboring in wintry conditions scoured back country near Two Medicine, Mont., for days by air, on foot and on horseback, aided by a dog team.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2002
Just about every week for three years, Tom Rabenhorst ventured into Patapsco Valley State Park with a 4-foot-tall, red-and-white striped pole topped with a circular antenna. The 58-year-old geography teacher and his wife, Carol, 57, tackled switchback trails and rock formations, tracking their progress with a Global Positioning System unit and doing something that had never been done. They mapped all 170 miles of trails in the sprawling park. "It's a monumental feat without a doubt," said Lt. Chris Bushman, the park manager.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Lost Lake, Wyoming - July 30, 2009: "I see where other hikers have tried to cross the [mountain's] snow face with ice axes and I attempt to follow in their footprints. But I take about five steps and realize with only [hiking] poles it's too dangerous and I'm not willing to die this way. ... [I end up] going around snowfields up a canyon wall of loose stone, my feet sliding out from under me. ... "Heading down the backside with its 40 percent descent is almost as suicidal as climbing up. … This mountain is begging me to make a mistake, but I live to see another day."
NEWS
April 8, 2010
BILLINGS, Mont. - Glacier National Park has lost two more of its namesake moving ice fields to climate change, which is shrinking the rivers of ice until they grind to a halt, the U.S. Geological Survey said Wednesday. Higher temperatures have reduced the number of named glaciers in the northwestern Montana park to 25, said Dan Fagre, an ecologist with the agency. He warned the rest of the glaciers might be gone by decade's end. "When we're measuring glacier margins, by the time we go home the glacier is already smaller than what we've measured," Fagre said.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 1995
Peanut-butter sandwiches never tasted so good. We'd hiked uphill nearly five miles in the middle of Glacier National Park for the privilege of eating those sandwiches beside the famed Grinnell Glacier in Montana.It was worth every arduous step. Along the trail, Matt, Reggie and Melanie munched on huckleberries they'd picked right off the vines, watched mountain goats nimbly climb the cliffs and tried to guess the names of the amazing array of wildflowers we saw -- red Indian paintbrush, yellow monkey-flowers, purple sky pilots among them.
TRAVEL
By Thomas Curwen and Thomas Curwen,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. -- The late July storm broke over the valley like a wave over the prow of a ship. Hikers, emerging from the forest, dashed across stretches of lawn as lightning cut across the darkening sky. Couples in canoes awkwardly zigzagged their way toward the dock as thunder rumbled overhead. In front of the Many Glacier Hotel, picnickers packed up their lunch and scurried toward the first open door. Inside, a hastily built fire gained strength and filled the lobby with the scent of burning pine.
TRAVEL
November 29, 2009
We live in Annapolis and my wife Laurie's dream vacation has been to go to Montana. We've been to the Caribbean, Europe and had lots of great vacations, but our trip to Glacier National Park and Yellowstone was nothing short of amazing. At Glacier we took a one-hour helicopter ride up to the Canadian border. It was really windy and the ride was pretty hairy. My wife sat up front with the pilot and every time the helicopter dropped due to a wind shear she grabbed the pilot's leg. Despite the occasional terror, the scenery was amazing, including this photo of one of the lakes in Glacier National Park.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Lost Lake, Wyoming - July 30, 2009: "I see where other hikers have tried to cross the [mountain's] snow face with ice axes and I attempt to follow in their footprints. But I take about five steps and realize with only [hiking] poles it's too dangerous and I'm not willing to die this way. ... [I end up] going around snowfields up a canyon wall of loose stone, my feet sliding out from under me. ... "Heading down the backside with its 40 percent descent is almost as suicidal as climbing up. … This mountain is begging me to make a mistake, but I live to see another day."
TRAVEL
By Thomas Curwen and Thomas Curwen,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. -- The late July storm broke over the valley like a wave over the prow of a ship. Hikers, emerging from the forest, dashed across stretches of lawn as lightning cut across the darkening sky. Couples in canoes awkwardly zigzagged their way toward the dock as thunder rumbled overhead. In front of the Many Glacier Hotel, picnickers packed up their lunch and scurried toward the first open door. Inside, a hastily built fire gained strength and filled the lobby with the scent of burning pine.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2002
Just about every week for three years, Tom Rabenhorst ventured into Patapsco Valley State Park with a 4-foot-tall, red-and-white striped pole topped with a circular antenna. The 58-year-old geography teacher and his wife, Carol, 57, tackled switchback trails and rock formations, tracking their progress with a Global Positioning System unit and doing something that had never been done. They mapped all 170 miles of trails in the sprawling park. "It's a monumental feat without a doubt," said Lt. Chris Bushman, the park manager.
TRAVEL
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff | December 26, 1999
High up the trail to Grinnel Glacier, at the sharp edge of the Continental Divide, I spotted a group of hikers clustered on a slab of rock, pointing and peering through binoculars with a mixture of exhilaration and apprehension. I rounded the bend and stopped short. I turned to my wife, Brigid, who was crossing a snowfield below, and began waving my arms over my head. "There's a bear about 100 yards above you," I mouthed. A grizzly bear! Liam, our 10-month-old son, bundled on my back, placidly sucked the pacifier I'd tied with a leather shoelace to his backpack, blissfully unaware that I was mentally calculating how fast I could rip off the backpack and roll into a ball with him in the middle and play dead.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1996
What is the best time to see eagles and bears in Glacier National Park?Eagles are harder to spot than they used to be, said Rick Yates, a biological technician at the park. Until about 10 years ago, he said, "We had as many as 600 bald eagles in October, November."But then the number of Kokanee salmon, upon which the eagles were feeding, dropped markedly. Among the reasons for the decline, Yates said, were the introduction of nonnative shrimp, which beat out the salmon in competition for food; the many fish taken by fishermen; and the lowering of the level of Flathead Lake.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1996
What is the best time to see eagles and bears in Glacier National Park?Eagles are harder to spot than they used to be, said Rick Yates, a biological technician at the park. Until about 10 years ago, he said, "We had as many as 600 bald eagles in October, November."But then the number of Kokanee salmon, upon which the eagles were feeding, dropped markedly. Among the reasons for the decline, Yates said, were the introduction of nonnative shrimp, which beat out the salmon in competition for food; the many fish taken by fishermen; and the lowering of the level of Flathead Lake.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 1995
Peanut-butter sandwiches never tasted so good. We'd hiked uphill nearly five miles in the middle of Glacier National Park for the privilege of eating those sandwiches beside the famed Grinnell Glacier in Montana.It was worth every arduous step. Along the trail, Matt, Reggie and Melanie munched on huckleberries they'd picked right off the vines, watched mountain goats nimbly climb the cliffs and tried to guess the names of the amazing array of wildflowers we saw -- red Indian paintbrush, yellow monkey-flowers, purple sky pilots among them.
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