Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGlacier
IN THE NEWS

Glacier

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Thomas Flanagan | December 17, 1993
THE tangled narratives of the relationship between Ireland and Britain -- and among the people of Ireland, north and south -- are littered with broken promises, betrayals and easy solutions.The shattered hopes are so embedded in the glaciers of unforgiving history that one reads with trepidation Wednesday's declaration of a "framework of peace" by the governments in London and Dublin.But this is the very brightest possibility to have emerged in the quarter-century's violence that has claimed 3,000 lives -- Protestants and Roman Catholics, gunmen, soldiers, civilians, children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2010
BILLINGS, Mont. - Glacier National Park has lost two more of its namesake moving ice fields to climate change, which is shrinking the rivers of ice until they grind to a halt, the U.S. Geological Survey said Wednesday. Higher temperatures have reduced the number of named glaciers in the northwestern Montana park to 25, said Dan Fagre, an ecologist with the agency. He warned the rest of the glaciers might be gone by decade's end. "When we're measuring glacier margins, by the time we go home the glacier is already smaller than what we've measured," Fagre said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | June 18, 1991
Volunteers from the Severna Park United Methodist Church expected toget good and wet when they went to build a church in Alaska last month. After all, it rains 300 days of the year there.But during their 11-day sojourn laying the foundation for the first Methodist church in the Mendenhall Valley in Juneau, it rained only once."We were lucky," says Mel Merritt, a local homebuilder who directed the 27 volunteers. "We were blessed."The group, one of severalmission teams building the church this summer, finished the foundation work ahead of schedule.
TRAVEL
August 23, 2009
We live in Towson and last summer we traveled out West to explore Glacier National Park, Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons. It was at Glacier National Park in Montana where I photographed my son overlooking Avalanche Lake. Fed by Sperry Glacier above, waterfalls spew thousands of feet down the cliffs at the head of the lake. We hiked through pouring rain, up to this subalpine lake, only to be rewarded with a break in the weather and this incredible view. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
TRAVEL
By Thomas Curwen and Thomas Curwen,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. -- The late July storm broke over the valley like a wave over the prow of a ship. Hikers, emerging from the forest, dashed across stretches of lawn as lightning cut across the darkening sky. Couples in canoes awkwardly zigzagged their way toward the dock as thunder rumbled overhead. In front of the Many Glacier Hotel, picnickers packed up their lunch and scurried toward the first open door. Inside, a hastily built fire gained strength and filled the lobby with the scent of burning pine.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 30, 1995
Michael Stepanovich never believed he would get to bury the father he never knew. "Not in this lifetime," he says. His father was 1st Lt. Frank Ramos, Army Air Forces, lost to the winds of war 51 years ago. To Ramos' survivors, the possibility of someone finding his remains and bringing them home always seemed as remote as the ice-encrusted Himalayan slope where the young lieutenant died.But somewhere a glacier shifted, and therein lies a story.Frank Miguel Ramos Jr. was 25, the co-pilot of a cargo plane, when he disappeared in January 1944 in one of the frozen, distant terrains of World War II. Two years later, his widow in Texas received a two-page letter from the Army that made official and final the presumption of her husband's death.
TRAVEL
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,Sun Staff | September 14, 2003
If you look way down into the valley on your right, you might see a red spot on the rocks -- that's the bus I was driving yesterday." The deadpan delivery of driver Jay Wilcox didn't slow down, even as his 1930s touring bus had to, as it negotiated the hairpin turns along the narrow Going-to-the-Sun Road of Glacier National Park, in Montana. He follows a proud tradition of nearly seven decades, transporting and informing and entertaining passengers who travel in the vintage open-top Red Buses along what many consider the most breathtaking road of the National Parks system.
TRAVEL
By Phil Marty and Phil Marty,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
It wasn't love at first sight. But here in Iceland, midway through a nine-day drive around this island country, this was the clincher: To my right, a 25-foot-high waterfall thundered, dumping its icy waters into a stream that frothed from rock to rock on its way to the fjord below. To my left, at the bottom of a switchbacky two-lane asphalt road, a tiny village rested in the mist at the end of the fjord that runs 10 miles east to the North Atlantic. Turning in a slow circle, I saw freshet after freshet springing from cloud-draped, green mountain ridges.
TRAVEL
August 23, 2009
We live in Towson and last summer we traveled out West to explore Glacier National Park, Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons. It was at Glacier National Park in Montana where I photographed my son overlooking Avalanche Lake. Fed by Sperry Glacier above, waterfalls spew thousands of feet down the cliffs at the head of the lake. We hiked through pouring rain, up to this subalpine lake, only to be rewarded with a break in the weather and this incredible view. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
FEATURES
By Kathryn Straach and Kathryn Straach,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 21, 1996
Stroll through the homey lobby of the Izaak Walton Inn, with its knotty-pine walls and ceiling, huge stone fireplace and Montana-made furniture. Drink in its soothing scenery and its friendly people.Now here's a Montana hideaway where you could really hunker down.And many people do.The Izaak Walton Inn, in Essex, attracts a mix of train buffs, cross-country skiers, fishermen, hikers, mountain bikers, nature lovers, outdoor enthusiasts and families.The three-story lodge, bordering Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall and Great Bear wildernesses in northwest Montana, was built in 1939 for the crews who serviced the Great Northern Railway.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2008
PUNAKHA, Bhutan -- High in the Himalayas, above this peaceful valley where farmers till a patchwork of emerald-green fields, an icy lake fed by melting glaciers waits to become a "tsunami from the sky." The lake is swollen dangerously past normal levels, thanks to the global warming that is causing the glaciers to retreat at record speed. But no one knows when the tipping point will come and the lake can take no more, bursting its banks and sending torrents of water crashing into the valley below.
TRAVEL
December 23, 2007
We hiked two miles to Avalanche Lake in West Glacier National Park, in Montana, to see this magnificent sight. It was early June, and you can see the three large waterfalls flowing down the mountains. We also saw seven smaller waterfalls with our binoculars. What a great time of year to visit! It was a great spot for our picnic lunch that day. Theresa Garrett Baltimore The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
TRAVEL
By Thomas Curwen and Thomas Curwen,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. -- The late July storm broke over the valley like a wave over the prow of a ship. Hikers, emerging from the forest, dashed across stretches of lawn as lightning cut across the darkening sky. Couples in canoes awkwardly zigzagged their way toward the dock as thunder rumbled overhead. In front of the Many Glacier Hotel, picnickers packed up their lunch and scurried toward the first open door. Inside, a hastily built fire gained strength and filled the lobby with the scent of burning pine.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2007
NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK, Wash. -- Global warming is altering the identity of national parks in the West, especially the Pacific Northwest, where the iconic string of glacier-capped mountains inexorably shrinks from the horizon, park officials warn. The melting ice caps in Washington state, home to more glaciers than anywhere else in the lower 48, are providing one of the most visual accountings of global warming outside Alaska and the Arctic, enhanced by federal officials' digital archiving last year of photos of park glaciers taken 50 years ago. The changes over the decades are threatening the aesthetics and ecosystems of parks such as North Cascades, imperiling the country's natural heritage, park officials and conservationists said.
TRAVEL
October 29, 2006
In July, my husband, 14-year-old grandson and I took a bus tour to Glacier National Park in Montana. St. Mary Lake was one of the most spectacular and breathtaking views we enjoyed on our trip. We felt that this was God's country and we were honored to be able to see such beautiful scenery. Pat Turner Baltimore The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for this page. "My Best Shot" photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture. "A Memorable Place" essays should be 500 words or less and accompanied by a photo.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
Greenland's vast glaciers are dumping ice into the ocean three times faster than they did 10 years ago because of higher temperatures, suggesting that sea level could rise even more quickly than current projections. The study, published today in the journal Science, found that the glaciers contributed 53 cubic miles of water to the Atlantic Ocean in 2005, resulting in about a 0.02-inch rise in sea level. "The models we had were not terribly alarming about Greenland," said Richard Alley, a glaciologist at Penn State University who was not involved in the research.
NEWS
August 10, 2002
Archbald Pothole State Park has its own Web site that, among other things, describes when and how the pothole was formed. The site is at www. dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/ parks/archbald.htm. Here is an excerpt from the explanation provided on the site: "A pothole usually is a hole which is worn into the bedrock of a stream at the base of waterfalls or in strong rapids. The moving water spins sand, gravel and rock fragments in any small indentation in the bedrock. After enough time, the sand and stones carve out an elliptical hole.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 2002
The entombment of a Russian village under 3 million tons of ice and mud from a collapsing glacier is a sign of the gradual yet vast climatic changes sweeping the world's mountainous regions, scientists say. The disaster on the slopes of the Caucasus Mountains in Russia's North Ossetia region last week left more than 100 people missing and at least nine dead. Researchers maintain that the avalanche is part of a subtle chain of events that has transformed once-frozen mountains and is altering the course of nearby human settlements in unexpected, and sometimes disastrous, ways.
NEWS
By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
The Ice Soldier Paul Watkins Henry Holt / 352 pages / $25 The adventuring mid-20th-century Englishmen in Paul Watkins' ninth novel, The Ice Soldier, generally show the world a stiff upper lip, but they're a dying breed. Watkins' book has utterly infectious vitality when it is following their Alpine exploits, but an elegiac feel when it is in town - elegiac for its characters' wavering spirit of dedication to an ideal of physical valor and courage. With the incursion of World War II and the fair facsimiles of hell it thrusts upon the characters, modern doubt and cynicism can be glimpsed gaining a foothold on their psyches.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
When Joppatowne resident Debbie Beall got word that her great-uncle could be the World War II airman whose body was found intact and frozen in a California glacier recently, her son had a question about his relative. "Was he a caveman?" Beall recalls her son, 8-year-old Joey Kozlowski, saying. Relatives and descendants of four World War II soldiers have been holding their breath since October, when hikers found a body encased in a glacier in the Sierra Nevada. It was flown to Honolulu, where military forensic scientists have determined the body came from a plane carrying four soldiers that crashed in 1942.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.