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SPORTS
June 17, 2001
Transactions Baseball Brewers: Optioned P Kyle Peterson to Triple-A Indianapolis. Recalled P Brandon Kolb from Indianapolis. White Sox: Optioned P Matt Ginter to Triple-A Charlotte. Recalled P Gary Glover from Charlotte. Hockey Islanders: Re-signed C Mats Lindgren. Signed D Radek Martinek, D Dick Tarnstrom and D Marko Kiprusoff to multiyear contracts. Announced D Ray Giroux has returned to team from Europe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 21, 2012
The speculation and apocrypha surrounding "cover curses" in sports go back at least as far as the " Sports Illustrated cover jinx . " In the age of video games, the " Madden Curse " has taken up the mantle as the most hotly-debated superstition in sports marketing. Close behind "Madden" in the curse department is "NHL," which has had rumblings about a curse since the late 1990s. Sports Illustrated themselves even devoted a gallery to it . It's important to note that "curses" are empirically bunk, especially in sports.
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NEWS
By Herbert Mitgang and Herbert Mitgang,New York Times News Service HC | April 26, 1992
In December 1860, more than four years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln in Ford's Theater in Washington, the actor wrote a 21-page manuscript that showed his fanatical state of mind, his sympathies for the Southern secessionists, and his association with the historical characters he portrayed in Shakespeare's plays.In the view of Lincoln scholars, had these sentiments been known to the officials responsible for guarding the president, it is possible that Booth would not have had such easy access to the theater on April 14, 1865.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The National Book Foundation; amazon.com | October 19, 2008
More than 200 publishers submitted 1,258 books for the 2008 National Book Awards. Here are the finalists, which were announced Wednesday. The winners will be announced Nov. 19. FICTION The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon Riverhead / 304 pages / $24.95 A young writer in Chicago goes in search of the answers to why a police chief killed an Eastern European immigrant a century ago. Telex from Cuba by Rachel Kushner Scribner / 336 pages / $25...
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
Hammond won its fifth straight Class 2A-1A South regional dual- meet championship at Hammond last night. The Bears (14-2) defeated Glenelg in the championship match, 37-24, after crushing unbeaten Poly in the semifinals, 68-6. Glenelg (11-5), making its first dual-meet championship appearance, had rocked unbeaten Bladensburg, 26-12, to reach the finals. Glenelg coach Rob Bowman thought his team had a chance of beating Hammond even though the Gladiators had lost earlier this season to the Bears, 43-21.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | July 6, 2006
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp.'s board of directors likely will give a green light to further discussions on a global alliance with France's Renault SA and Japan's Nissan Motor Co. when members meet tomorrow, analysts said yesterday. The board has little choice but to consider the proposal by billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian, who last week sent a letter to GM Chief Executive Rick Wagoner urging the automaker to consider joining the alliance. "What are the options, to say, `We're not going to consider it?
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | June 10, 2007
Origin By Diana Abu-Jaber Norton / 388 pages / $24 The Broken Shore By Peter Temple Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 356 pages / $24 Temple's previous efforts -- especially the Jack Irish novels -- amply illustrate why he's one of the best reasons to be thankful to Australia. But The Broken Shore takes his work to a richer, darker place, taking the conventions of crime novels and expanding them to incorporate the idiosyncrasies and unique traits of Temple's native country. In Joe Cashin, Temple fashions a man scarred raw from his experiences as a homicide detective who takes refuge in the small Australian coast island of his birth to escape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The National Book Foundation; amazon.com | October 19, 2008
More than 200 publishers submitted 1,258 books for the 2008 National Book Awards. Here are the finalists, which were announced Wednesday. The winners will be announced Nov. 19. FICTION The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon Riverhead / 304 pages / $24.95 A young writer in Chicago goes in search of the answers to why a police chief killed an Eastern European immigrant a century ago. Telex from Cuba by Rachel Kushner Scribner / 336 pages / $25...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
After a long time of reading mainly history and biography (and murder mysteries - always a guilty pleasure creeping in), it has been refreshing to honor National Poetry Month by reading some recent releases. Poetry inspires the most personal and idiosyncratic reactions of all the literary forms, so I have without apology chosen three favorites. Eternal Enemies By Adam Zagajewski, translated by Clare Cavanagh Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 116 pages / $24 The weight of history lies heavily on Poland, and for contemporary Polish poets the shadow of the great Czeslaw Milosz must cast its own weight.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
GULF MUSIC: POEMS -- By Robert Pinsky Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 96 pages / $22 The gulf in the title of Pinsky's seventh collection is both the large southern body of water that has been the site of so much weather-related misery, and the unavoidable distances between an author's thoughts and feelings and his expression. Poems from the first section frequently butt up against subjects too large for speech, and break down into music and mystery. The title poem begins with a devastating hurricane in Galveston, Texas, in 1900 and reaches after fragments and song to recall what was lost: "O try my tra-la-la, ma la belle, mah wallah-woe."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
After a long time of reading mainly history and biography (and murder mysteries - always a guilty pleasure creeping in), it has been refreshing to honor National Poetry Month by reading some recent releases. Poetry inspires the most personal and idiosyncratic reactions of all the literary forms, so I have without apology chosen three favorites. Eternal Enemies By Adam Zagajewski, translated by Clare Cavanagh Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 116 pages / $24 The weight of history lies heavily on Poland, and for contemporary Polish poets the shadow of the great Czeslaw Milosz must cast its own weight.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
GULF MUSIC: POEMS -- By Robert Pinsky Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 96 pages / $22 The gulf in the title of Pinsky's seventh collection is both the large southern body of water that has been the site of so much weather-related misery, and the unavoidable distances between an author's thoughts and feelings and his expression. Poems from the first section frequently butt up against subjects too large for speech, and break down into music and mystery. The title poem begins with a devastating hurricane in Galveston, Texas, in 1900 and reaches after fragments and song to recall what was lost: "O try my tra-la-la, ma la belle, mah wallah-woe."
NEWS
By Stephanie Zacharek and Stephanie Zacharek,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2007
Beethoven Was One-Sixteenth Black And Other Stories By Nadine Gordimer Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 180 pages / $21 When you've won a Nobel Prize, you can do pretty much anything you want, including write a short story from the point of view of a tapeworm. And that's what Nadine Gordimer has done: "Tape Measure" is one of the 13 works included in her new collection, Beethoven Was One-Sixteenth Black. We join our astonishingly articulate parasite friend as he - it? - recounts his shock at having been banished from his host's body, catapulted into the toilet bowl and flushed into whatever lies beyond: "And now!
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | June 10, 2007
Origin By Diana Abu-Jaber Norton / 388 pages / $24 The Broken Shore By Peter Temple Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 356 pages / $24 Temple's previous efforts -- especially the Jack Irish novels -- amply illustrate why he's one of the best reasons to be thankful to Australia. But The Broken Shore takes his work to a richer, darker place, taking the conventions of crime novels and expanding them to incorporate the idiosyncrasies and unique traits of Temple's native country. In Joe Cashin, Temple fashions a man scarred raw from his experiences as a homicide detective who takes refuge in the small Australian coast island of his birth to escape.
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los Angeles Times | May 27, 2007
The Atomic Bazaar The Rise of the Nuclear Poor By William Langewiesche Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 182 pages / $22 Writing from Iraq for Vanity Fair last November, in a posting titled "Rules of Engagement," journalist William Langewiesche began with the Euphrates and enumerated the towns strung along it in Al Anbar province: Fallujah, Ramadi, Hit, Haditha. Of the last, he noted, "Snipers permitting, you can walk it top to bottom in less than an hour, allowing time enough to stone the dogs.
NEWS
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2006
After This Alice McDermott Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 288 pages / $24.00 There is the temptation, after reading Alice McDermott, to read nothing else for the longest time - to hold every exquisite word of her most exquisite novels in your head. There is the temptation to declare that she, along with Michael Ondaatje, is the best living writer of our age. That she exercises patience, compassion and wisdom where others emphasize strut, that she trusts herself with the power of scenes over the inflated intricacies of complicated plot.
NEWS
By JAY NEUGEBOREN and JAY NEUGEBOREN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2006
Physical: An American Checkup James McManus Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 255 pages / $24 About two-thirds of the way through Physical: An American Checkup, James McManus' account of events preceding and following a three-day, $8,484.25 physical he undergoes at the Mayo Clinic, McManus receives a call from his wife, Jennifer: At a children's birthday party, their 5-year-old daughter, Grace, has had her eye punctured by a two-pronged wire sticking out from the end of a magic wand. "From my scalp to my bowels," McManus tells us, "I shuddered."
NEWS
By CLARE MCHUGH and CLARE MCHUGH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2006
The Last of Her Kind Sigrid Nunez Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 375 pages / $25 This is a novel about idealism, and also about race relations, class, madness, rock music and the true nature of love. It's a tribute to the skill and sensitivity of author Sigrid Nunez that The Last of Her Kind has something revelatory to say about each of these subjects. Decades from now historians would do well to consult this book to get a true sense of how the upheavals of the late 1960s reverberated through the lives of young Americans, from one who experienced this social earthquake firsthand.
NEWS
By James Marcus and James Marcus,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 2006
The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History Jonathan Franzen Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 196 pages / $22 In one chapter of his new memoir, Jonathan Franzen recalls his youthful immersion in the German language, which culminated in a grudging conquest of The Magic Mountain. It was, appropriately, an uphill battle. Thomas Mann's masterwork, with its jackhammer ironies and its Teutonic nerd of a protagonist, almost drove the Swarthmore senior out of his mind. Yet he recognized "at the heart of the book ... a question of genuine personal interest both to Mann and to me: How does it happen that a young person so quickly strays so far from the values and expectations of his middle-class upbringing?"
NEWS
By ROGER K. MILLER and ROGER K. MILLER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2006
Five Germanys I Have Known Fritz Stern Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 544 pages / $26 Fritz Stern has written what might be called a "scholarly memoir," combining the objectivity and intellectual rigor of the academic with the warmth and intimacy of the memoirist, of the "five Germanys" he has known: the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, postwar West Germany and East Germany and today's reunited Germany. Anyone having an interest in 20th-century European history will find the book engrossing.
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