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EXPLORE
July 1, 2011
Laurel Boys and Girls Club, 701 Montgomery St., will hold registration for tackle football and cheerleading for ages 5 to 14 on July 7 and 8, 6:30-8:15 p.m., and July 9, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Registration fee is $75 per child. To register online, go to http://www.laurelboysandgirlsclub.org . Call the club at 301-490-4591.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Ever since he started his foundation, Michael Phelps has been trying to educate Baltimore kids on water safety and attempting to save lives with swimming lessons. Now he's expanding that mission beyond the Baltimore area, and taking it nationwide. The Michael Phelps foundation announced Thursday that it is expanding its signature "im" program through the Boys and Girls Club of America, making it available in 16 clubs across 14 states this summer. The program — which is named in recognition of one of Phelps' signature events, the individual medley — aims to teach children the basics about water safety, and encourage kids to use swimming as part of a healthy, active lifestyle.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Laurel High School once again had a successful Grad Night thanks to the support of many. I can't possibly thank everyone in limited space, but I want to especially thank Mayor Craig Moe and the city of Laurel for continuing to support and sponsor our all-night, substance-free celebration; and Levet Brown, and the Laurel Boys and Girls Club for his support and use of their facilities. Thank you to all the businesses, individuals and groups that have continued to support this program through donations of money, food, door prizes or services — some for 23 years!
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | May 6, 2011
Owners Keith and Kathy Rawlings are the driving forces behind the success of The Arena Club, this year’s BEST OF winner in four categories: Health Club , Indoor Activity , Party Place and Swim Club . “People and relationships are what matters in life,” says Kathy. “The Arena club staff all live in Harford County—our families and friends are all part of this community. It is important to us to make everyone feel welcome and comfortable so we can help them achieve their goals.” This hands-on, family approach to their business is a large part of the Rawlings’ success today.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
With a balloon, a straw, a clothespin, tape and string, a group of young scientists designed a rocket that could fly across a room on a trajectory between two chairs. During their aerodynamics experiment, the children discovered that as the balloon releases air, it will travel along the string from one point to another. Then, they tested the theory with multiple balloons and organized races in their lab at the Aberdeen Boys and Girls Club in Harford County. "I learned how to make a rocket out of a balloon today," said Jeremy Valerio, 12. "With just a little material, you can make something big. " During a 10-week, after-school program, a dozen children are pursuing informal science lessons, meeting with area scientists and engineers, and testing their own math and science skills.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
The newspaper headline - "Middle River Girl Killed by Train" - could have run last week when 14-year-old Anna Marie Stickel was struck and killed by a passenger train while walking to Kenwood High School. But the headline actually ran in May 1968, when 9-year-old Bonnie Louise Calhoun was run over near Martin Boulevard and Old Eastern Avenue - within walking distance of where Anna was killed - by a Pennsylvania Railroad train. Little has changed over four decades on these tracks in eastern Baltimore County, where the nation's busiest passenger rail corridor divides neighborhoods from several schools.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
At 5:30 in the morning on a school day, Bryn Mawr senior Jay Greene is already gliding across the ice at the Mount Pleasant Ice Arena. Greene occasionally has a few moments alone before ice hockey practice, and one of her favorite memories is of the quiet that made her realize why she likes the sport so much. "This one time, I got on the ice at about 5:15. There was still fog on the ice, and you couldn't see to the other end. It was completely silent. There was no one else in the rink except the manager.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
It's unlikely you'll see Michael Phelps peel off his shirt, lean out of his open-top Hummer and fling it into the parade crowd today. That's something he did in 2004, the first time he returned home from the Olympics to attend a parade in his honor. His mother, Debbie, responded in mock horror, and as his female fans squealed, Phelps flashed a cocky grin before reluctantly covering himself. You won't see that from Phelps today because - sorry, ladies - he's more mature and more comfortable with his fame.
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