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By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
Kelly Heier dreams of playing college basketball, but the 12-year-old has never been to a college women's game.As a youngster, Dana Bollinger never attended a women's college game either, but she is living Heier's dream at Goucher College.Tomorrow, Bollinger and her Gophers teammates will introduce Kelly and her Fallston travel teammates to women's college basketball as part of Goucher's commemoration of the 12th National Girls and Women in Sports Day. Kelly's team will scrimmage Towson's 11-12 travel team as a prelude to the Gophers' 2 p.m. game against Marymount.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Spend a little time watching tween television shows and one thing quickly becomes apparent. The girl characters might be smart or ditzy, athletic or brainy, nice or mean, but above else, they are attractive. Researchers at the University of Delaware and University of Missouri studied television shows on Nickelodeon, Disney and the Cartoon Network and found there were no unattractive girls on any of the shows .  In addition, the girls often were portrayed as concerned about their looks or receiving comments about their appearance.
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NEWS
July 12, 2012
Great numbers of girls and women suffer from the impacts of a negative body image, including, for example, health concerns such as eating disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health, referring to the results of the National Comorbidity Study - Adolescent Supplement, cites that approximately 2.7 percent of 13-to-18-year-olds, suffer from anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating. Based on the U.S. 2010 Census, approximately 6,300 Maryland adolescent girls are estimated to suffer from eating disorders.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 22, 2013
After 12 years of fighting, the Taliban in Afghanistan have announced they are ready to talk peace with the United States. The Taliban opened a political office in Qatar. The talks will take place there, but without the Afghan government, which is refusing to take part in the "peace" talks. President Barack Obama says there will be "a lot of bumps in the road" during the talks. More like sinkholes. The history of talks with Middle East terrorist groups, apparently, has taught us little.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1995
For a record-setting nine years, national and international gold medalist Wendy Hilliard had represented the United States in rhythmic gymnastics.Yet when Hilliard went looking for financial support during her final year of competition in 1988, she found no interest. That's when Hilliard got her introduction to the Women's Sports Foundation.The foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting and enhancing the sports and fitness experience for girls and women, bestowed its travel and training grant upon Hilliard.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
When it comes to what the therapists call "body image," Marissa Massey doesn't seem to need much bucking up. Before the question was even asked, the inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women had a ready answer: "I love my body. I do." If everyone had that much confidence, Saturday's event at the prison in Jessup might not have been considered necessary. Representatives of the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt and the Girl Scouts set up shop at the prison yesterday to continue their campaign to resist what is considered a pervasive cultural obsession with an ideal body type, usually thin and thinner.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2007
With human papillomavirus, girls and women have been getting all the attention. Parents across the United States have rushed to have their daughters vaccinated against the virus. States are wrestling with whether to require adolescents be vaccinated. And recent research found that HPV infection rates among girls and women are higher than previously thought - more than one-quarter of females ages 14 to 59. Now the attention is turning to boys and men. As many as 60 percent of men ages 18 to 70 are infected with HPV, according to data not yet published, raising the question of whether the new vaccine will be effective unless men, not just women, are immunized.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Spend a little time watching tween television shows and one thing quickly becomes apparent. The girl characters might be smart or ditzy, athletic or brainy, nice or mean, but above else, they are attractive. Researchers at the University of Delaware and University of Missouri studied television shows on Nickelodeon, Disney and the Cartoon Network and found there were no unattractive girls on any of the shows .  In addition, the girls often were portrayed as concerned about their looks or receiving comments about their appearance.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | July 10, 2001
JUST WHEN San Francisco Chronicle sportswriter Jane Gottesman must have been putting the finishing touches on a seven-year mission to collect the rare photographs of women playing sports, Brandi Chastain took her shirt off. That act of uninhibited joy, which punctuated the 1999 World Cup victory of the American women's team, had been practiced by victorious male athletes forever. But the fact that a woman did it changed the nature of the conversation about women and sports. Thanks to Title IX, girls and women have been given more and varied opportunities to play sports for almost 30 years.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | November 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Nushawn Williams was despicably criminal in having unprotected sex with dozens of New York state girls and women after he knew that he was infected with the deadly AIDS virus. He was a devout criminal who apparently hung out near the high school in Mayville, N.Y., seducing many female students who would give him sex for drugs. And, after he drifted into New York City, this 20-year-old was able to charm dozens of adult females into having sex with him.At latest count, health officials had identified at least 28 girls and women who had had sexual intercourse with Mr. Williams, some of whom are now infected with the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Great numbers of girls and women suffer from the impacts of a negative body image, including, for example, health concerns such as eating disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health, referring to the results of the National Comorbidity Study - Adolescent Supplement, cites that approximately 2.7 percent of 13-to-18-year-olds, suffer from anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating. Based on the U.S. 2010 Census, approximately 6,300 Maryland adolescent girls are estimated to suffer from eating disorders.
NEWS
By Whitney “Whitty” Ransome | April 25, 2011
April is Financial Literacy Month. Imagine how different the economic meltdown might have been if every school-aged child were taught some basic economic skills, from learning how to earn, save and budget to investing and donating money. Financial literacy is the intellectual raw material for crafting goals and shaping strategies in the new global economy. It's like learning another language, putting a "D" for "dollars" into the ABCs of education. Twenty years ago the term "financial literacy" was barely in the lexicon.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
The Maryland Women's Heritage Center, one of Baltimore's newest attractions, will open to the public next month. In the planning stage for three decades, the heritage center tells stories of achievement by women who have been inducted into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame as well as "unsung heroines" who shaped Maryland families and communities. It is an outgrowth of the Maryland Women's History Project, which began in 1980 as a collaborative venture between the Maryland Commission for Women and the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
When it comes to what the therapists call "body image," Marissa Massey doesn't seem to need much bucking up. Before the question was even asked, the inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women had a ready answer: "I love my body. I do." If everyone had that much confidence, Saturday's event at the prison in Jessup might not have been considered necessary. Representatives of the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt and the Girl Scouts set up shop at the prison yesterday to continue their campaign to resist what is considered a pervasive cultural obsession with an ideal body type, usually thin and thinner.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
Get a look at the new face of veganism. The mousy hippie chick who couldn't imagine eating a brown-eyed baby cow any more than she could imagine eating the family pet has grown up. She's a sexy, sassy babe with a smart-aleck attitude about the food choices you are making. Fashion has met food, and the work of a couple of escapees from the world of modeling has put veganism on the runway, creating a perceptible bump in the fastest-growing food trend among girls and young women. Credit for the new look of veganism goes to Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin, authors of Skinny Bitch, "a no-nonsense, tough-love guide for savvy girls who want to stop eating crap and start looking fabulous," and a new companion cookbook, Skinny Bitch in the Kitch.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2007
With human papillomavirus, girls and women have been getting all the attention. Parents across the United States have rushed to have their daughters vaccinated against the virus. States are wrestling with whether to require adolescents be vaccinated. And recent research found that HPV infection rates among girls and women are higher than previously thought - more than one-quarter of females ages 14 to 59. Now the attention is turning to boys and men. As many as 60 percent of men ages 18 to 70 are infected with HPV, according to data not yet published, raising the question of whether the new vaccine will be effective unless men, not just women, are immunized.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
The Maryland Women's Heritage Center, one of Baltimore's newest attractions, will open to the public next month. In the planning stage for three decades, the heritage center tells stories of achievement by women who have been inducted into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame as well as "unsung heroines" who shaped Maryland families and communities. It is an outgrowth of the Maryland Women's History Project, which began in 1980 as a collaborative venture between the Maryland Commission for Women and the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Judith Shapiro | November 28, 1994
BY NOW, the benefits of single-sex education for girls and women have been reported so often and so fully that you might think the advocates of women's institutions could snap their briefcases shut and declare the case closed.But we can't.It isn't enough to cite the familiar statistics showing that graduates of women's colleges succeed in traditionally male fields -- business, government, academia -- far out of proportion to their numbers in the population.Unless we understand the reasons for the success of single-sex education for girls and women, we risk missing some important lessons about education, society and the sexes today.
NEWS
By Randy Harvey and Randy Harvey,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
ATHENS - As a girl playing youth soccer in New Brunswick, N.J., Heather O'Reilly had a poster of Mia Hamm on her bedroom wall. On Monday night on the island of Crete, O'Reilly, 19, scored the winning goal in overtime after receiving a crossing pass from Hamm, 32, as the U.S. women's Olympic soccer team beat Germany, 2-1, to earn a berth in tonight's gold-medal match against Brazil. For soccer aficionados, the pass was important because of its impact on the game. For supporters of women's sports in the United States, it was even more significant as a symbolic passing of the torch from one generation of highly regarded athletes to another.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
THERE'S MIXED news about the status of girls and women in science and math. Females have made significant progress during the past 20 years in medicine and the biological sciences. But the gender gap hasn't closed in technology and engineering, and in computer science it has widened. These are among the findings of a report issued yesterday by the National Council for Research on Women. Among the report's lowlights: In 1996, women constituted 45 percent of the work force in the United States but held only 12 percent of science and engineering jobs in business and industry - this at a time when U.S. firms couldn't fill technically advanced jobs.
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