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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 19, 1993
Long before S.A.T.s, American schoolgirls' achievements were measured in linen, silk, and chenille. For most 18th- and early 19th-century girls fortunate enough to attend school, the major course of study was the art of embroidery. The result of a term's schooling usually was a charming sampler or silk embroidery in the latest fashion, which parents could frame and display proudly.Although the tradition of girlhood embroidery dates back to antiquity, its role in early American life now is unfolding thanks to Betty Ring, of Houston, Texas, a dedicated collector turned scholar and author.
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By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | October 12, 2007
For most of her 58 years, Gail Amalia Katz has called home her beloved, center-hall Colonial in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood. Katz was a child when her parents purchased the circa-1922 home near Pimlico Race Course in 1957. "These homes were built as summer cottages," she said. "There was no insulation, lots of tall trees, and [the houses were] away from the asphalt." Katz lived there until she went off to college and then married. Seven years later, in 1977, her parents decided to move to smaller quarters and offered the house to her and her husband, dentist Lee Katz.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
For the reader uninformed about Arab cultures, Fatima Mernissi's charming memoir "Dreams of Trespass" has a rather shocking subtitle: "Tales of a Harem Girlhood."The word "harem" has a connotation in the West, Ms. Mernissi writes, of "splendid palaces full of luxuriously dressed and lasciviously reclined indolent women," awaiting the emperor's bidding. While such imperial harems have their place in history, the more common one is what Ms. Mernissi writes about. She grew up in a domestic harem, in which a man might have more than one wife but was often monogamous and "carried on the tradition of women's seclusion."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Folks who can't handle too much truth have been relieved of a major burr under their saddles. Of all the fellow commentators to whom I have paid the honor of "Dang, I wish I'd said that first," Molly Ivins ranked at the top. Now she's gone. The Texas-based syndicated columnist died last week at age 62 after battling breast cancer since 1999. She fought it with the relentless energy she devoted to crusades against numerous other diseases, most of them political. Her voice was that of the Southern progressive, a courageous breed of people who won my respect and admiration during the rough days of the civil rights revolution in the 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 18, 2001
MIAMI -- Dear Justin Timberlake: I've got a major beef with you, dude. I figure it's time we had a few words. Now, I know what you're thinking. Who is this guy and why's he calling me out? I don't even know him. Well, Slick, you don't have to know me. I know you. In fact, I've known you for years. I knew you when your name was Davy Jones and you sang with the Monkees, knew you when you were Jermaine Jackson of the Jackson 5. I remember when your name was Ralph Tresvant and you belonged to New Edition, remember when it was Jordan Knight of New Kids on the Block.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Folks who can't handle too much truth have been relieved of a major burr under their saddles. Of all the fellow commentators to whom I have paid the honor of "Dang, I wish I'd said that first," Molly Ivins ranked at the top. Now she's gone. The Texas-based syndicated columnist died last week at age 62 after battling breast cancer since 1999. She fought it with the relentless energy she devoted to crusades against numerous other diseases, most of them political. Her voice was that of the Southern progressive, a courageous breed of people who won my respect and admiration during the rough days of the civil rights revolution in the 1950s and 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
"Mountain Time," by Ivan Doig. Scribner. 352 pages. $25.For years, Ivan Doig has been acclaimed as one of the leading writers of the American West, praised for a memoir called "This House of Sky" and assorted lyrical and poignant novels set in Montana.Having just read Doig's latest work of fiction, "Mountain Time," it's a little tough to see what the fuss was about.Despite some clever and graceful writing -- some marvelous passages, really -- "Mountain Time" is a disappointment; the whole of it doesn't add up to very much.
NEWS
September 21, 1990
Surprise!A truck driver who went to a brothel expecting a discreet dalliance instead came upon a shocking surprise -- his wife.It turned out that the woman, a homemaker by day, had been working as a call girl by night unbeknownst to her husband.The story was recounted yesterday in La Stampa, a newspaper in Turin, Italy.According to the account, a friend gave the trucker, 35, the address of an exclusive bordello in Teramo in central Italy and recommended he ask for a particular woman working there.
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By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the sun | May 24, 1998
May brings variety, in nature and in novels. Garden, park, beach or bathtub: choose a place, settle in and marvel at the luxuriant new crop of spring fiction.Don't be deceived by the jacket copy on Elizabeth Berg's sixth novel, "What We Keep" (Random House, 288 pages, $23). This book may look like bland women's magazine fiction at first glance, but it's in a different class altogether, bringing to mind such highbrow novels of girlhood as Lisa Shea's "Hula" and Susan Minot's "Monkeys."Ginny Young is flying to California for a reunion with her mother, with whom she's had no contact in 35 years.
NEWS
July 23, 1993
There is plenty of handwringing about teen-aged mothers. But what about the young adolescents who are likely candidates for early motherhood? Little attention has been directed toward the 11- to 14-year-old girls who are likely candidates for premature parenthood.But there is every reason to think that much more could be done to help girls in this age group weather the storms of adolescence. Keeping girls healthy, motivated and self-confident -- providing attractive alternatives to motherhood -- may well be the most effective way of encouraging them to postpone pregnancy until they are better able to shoulder parental responsibilities.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 30, 2006
So, Alicia C. Reid, who as a little girl used to play doctor by slapping bandages and arm slings on her daddy, can now be officially called Dr. Alicia C. Reid, proud recipient of a Ph.D. from the Weill Graduate School of Cornell University. And "Dr. Reid" is just how her family, friends and assorted well-wishers addressed her Saturday evening at a graduation party held in her honor. How Alicia Reid went from being a high school senior who had no idea how she was going to pay for college to a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University is a story akin to a gourmet chef's specialty, involving a dash of serendipity, a couple of cups of initiative, drive and smarts and a few hundred pounds of love.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 26, 2003
The title Girlhood splits in two on the opening credits, with "girl" and "hood" on separate lines. Obviously, the director, Liz Garbus, wants to achieve in a documentary the power and revelation of a fiction feature like Boyz N the Hood. And she comes achingly close to succeeding. As she follows two Baltimore teen-age girls through the Maryland juvenile correction system, her intimate focus and her responsiveness to their plight keep us rooting for their rehabilitation. But even when the system seems to work for one of the girls, Garbus doesn't quite open up the process - and audiences may leave wondering whether they've learned anything or have just been part of a social sensitivity session.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
The little girl in pigtails is sitting on her bed, talking about the day she killed her friend during a fight on a Baltimore street corner. "From what I remember, I stabbed her once," 14-year-old Shanae says matter-of-factly, her big brown eyes glancing up at the camera. "But from the autopsy reports, I stabbed her three times." This scene, from the opening of the documentary Girlhood, is how viewers first meet Shanae, the baby-faced Baltimore girl locked up for murder at age 12. A counselor has told Shanae that she seemed "quite happy" for a person who'd committed such a serious crime.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
Poverty, evictions and other troubles forced Jaime Jezovnik's family to bounce from neighborhood to neighborhood across Baltimore and the Eastern Shore. She attended 10 elementary schools in five years, leaving her unable to remember the names of friends or teachers and incapable of viewing school as anything but a sanctuary from a volatile childhood. Prompted by the instability of her girlhood, Jezovnik studied sociology and dreamed of a career as a public defender for young people. But a college job took her instead to a classroom at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for juvenile offenders.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 18, 2001
MIAMI -- Dear Justin Timberlake: I've got a major beef with you, dude. I figure it's time we had a few words. Now, I know what you're thinking. Who is this guy and why's he calling me out? I don't even know him. Well, Slick, you don't have to know me. I know you. In fact, I've known you for years. I knew you when your name was Davy Jones and you sang with the Monkees, knew you when you were Jermaine Jackson of the Jackson 5. I remember when your name was Ralph Tresvant and you belonged to New Edition, remember when it was Jordan Knight of New Kids on the Block.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
"Mountain Time," by Ivan Doig. Scribner. 352 pages. $25.For years, Ivan Doig has been acclaimed as one of the leading writers of the American West, praised for a memoir called "This House of Sky" and assorted lyrical and poignant novels set in Montana.Having just read Doig's latest work of fiction, "Mountain Time," it's a little tough to see what the fuss was about.Despite some clever and graceful writing -- some marvelous passages, really -- "Mountain Time" is a disappointment; the whole of it doesn't add up to very much.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 30, 2006
So, Alicia C. Reid, who as a little girl used to play doctor by slapping bandages and arm slings on her daddy, can now be officially called Dr. Alicia C. Reid, proud recipient of a Ph.D. from the Weill Graduate School of Cornell University. And "Dr. Reid" is just how her family, friends and assorted well-wishers addressed her Saturday evening at a graduation party held in her honor. How Alicia Reid went from being a high school senior who had no idea how she was going to pay for college to a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University is a story akin to a gourmet chef's specialty, involving a dash of serendipity, a couple of cups of initiative, drive and smarts and a few hundred pounds of love.
FEATURES
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the sun | May 24, 1998
May brings variety, in nature and in novels. Garden, park, beach or bathtub: choose a place, settle in and marvel at the luxuriant new crop of spring fiction.Don't be deceived by the jacket copy on Elizabeth Berg's sixth novel, "What We Keep" (Random House, 288 pages, $23). This book may look like bland women's magazine fiction at first glance, but it's in a different class altogether, bringing to mind such highbrow novels of girlhood as Lisa Shea's "Hula" and Susan Minot's "Monkeys."Ginny Young is flying to California for a reunion with her mother, with whom she's had no contact in 35 years.
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