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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Mary, the 24-year-old matriarch of the Maryland Zoo's giraffe herd, was euthanized Tuesday following a three-year bout with arthritis. "About two and a half years ago, she started showing signs of arthritis," zoo spokeswoman Jane Ballentine said. "The staff worked to manage her pain, keep her comfortable. But a few weeks ago, she seemed to become more uncomfortable, shifting her weight from leg to leg. "Her condition progressed very rapidly," she added. "As the days went on, they realized the treatments they were using just really weren't working for Mary.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Angel, an aging 17-year-old giraffe born and raised at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , was euthanized Tuesday, officials said. Angel long struggled with leg and back pain, which worsened recently, Dr. Ellen Bronson, the zoo's chief veterinarian, said in a statement. "While we were able to provide her with pain medicine which made her more comfortable, we realized that her quality of life was declining and the decision was made to euthanize her," Bronson said. She is the fourth older female giraffe to die at the zoo since 2008.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Two young okapi, an African forest mammal that looks like a cross between a giraffe and a zebra, have taken up residence in the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 's giraffe house. The two okapi are half-brothers, on loan from the Dallas Zoo. Askari (ahz-kar-ee) is almost two years old, while Magani (mah-gah-nee) is one. They arrived at the zoo on Oct. 18. "The two arrived in fine shape after their 16-hour ride from Dallas to Baltimore," Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator, said in a press release.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | May 8, 2013
Tom Willis knows all about making the best of whatever life throws at you. Born with no arms, he's had to make adjustments - about a million of them. He writes with his feet, for one thing. Steers a car with his feet. Cooks with his feet. He once fed biscuits with his toes to giraffes at the San Diego Zoo, praying the notoriously bad-tempered beasts wouldn't see the toes as dinner, too. That wouldn't have been good: a guy who uses his feet for everything has one chomped off by a giraffe.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | October 31, 1994
In Baltimore and Nairobi, Betty Leslie-Melville is known by another name: giraffe lady.And with good reason. For the last 20 years, she has dedicated her life to saving the endangered Rothschild Giraffe, a regal animal known for its immense size and snow-white legs.Along the way, she founded an education center for African children, wrote 10 books, lectured in virtually every state, introduced Candice Bergen, Johnny Carson and other celebrities to Kenya, and became the subject of a TV movie.
NEWS
By Tia Matthews and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
Mary and Bo became the proud parents of a 6-foot, 150-pound baby girl Sunday afternoon -- but not without complications.Shortly after the giraffe was born at the Baltimore Zoo, the first-time mother kicked the newborn, causing head injuries. The unnamed baby -- which zoo visitors can see for the first time tomorrow -- has been taken from Mary, although the giraffes still can interact."It's always exciting to have a baby born in the zoo," curator of mammals Sandy Kempske said yesterday, introducing the giraffe.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
Arunah Shepherdson Abell IV, a Baltimore architect whose novel design of a zoo structure penned the spectators rather than the animals and earned him national recognition, died of cancer Saturday at his sister's home in Ruxton. He was 67."Ed" Abell -- a great-grandson of Arunah S. Abell, founder in 1837 of The Sun -- designed the Baltimore Zoo's giraffe house, a circular structure that opened in 1966. His intent was to have the spectators walk up a ramp surrounded by a dry moat on each side and thus get a feel for the animals.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | April 19, 2008
She's sweet-tempered and curious - and as gentle and graceful as a 1,500-pound, 14-foot-tall animal can possibly be. Her keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore think she's beautiful. But when Gretchen the giraffe is in your face - all ears, horns, lips and drool, with her 18-inch tongue snaking out to grab a bunch of romaine - she's simply comical. There is nothing funny, however, about the challenge zoo veterinarians face each day keeping the geriatric giraffe as healthy and comfortable as possible as she nears the end of her life.
NEWS
April 26, 2000
Do you know? Do giraffes have horns? Answer: Yes! Giraffe are born with horns that are covered with skin and hair. As they get older, the horns become bone and are used for protection. Learn more! Visit the giraffe herd at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Giraffe and a Half" by Shel Silverstein. 1. The markings of a giraffe's coat are unique to each individual. Born with a brown and white coat, the pattern will never change, but the color might fade or get darker. 2. Six feet tall at birth, a giraffe can grow to 17 feet tall.
NEWS
April 26, 2000
What's for dinner? With its long neck and tongue, the giraffe eats the highest leaves of trees found throughout Africa. When a mama giraffe kisses her young... it is with a long, long lick from an 18-inch tongue! The giraffe is the tallest animal in the world. When it drinks, the giraffe has to spread its front legs far apart to lower its neck to the water. The animal's sharp hearing, eye-sight and towering height help it keep watch for danger. If attacked by a lion, the giraffe will use its hooves and powerful legs to defend itself and its young.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
I was utterly thrilled by your story about the new animals arriving at the zoo ("Maryland Zoo welcomes new lioness, giraffe," Dec. 3). However, I wish there had been as much in the article about the lioness, such as her age and weight, as there was about the giraffe. For a while, I have been going to the National Zoo in Washington because I felt that the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore was not doing anything new. it was the same-old, same-old that I've seen since I was little. However, with the new animals arriving I will be going to the Maryland Zoo once more.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Badu the lioness and Kesi the giraffe have taken up permanent residence in Charm City. The newest critters to call the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore home are going on public display for the first time this week. Kesi (rhymes with Jesse) was obtained from the Fort Wayne Children's Zoo in Indiana and arrived in Baltimore on Oct. 12. She stands about 11 feet tall and weighs around 1,000 pounds, according to Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator. "She is still acclimating to her new environment and getting used to seeing people inside the Giraffe House," he said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Two young okapi, an African forest mammal that looks like a cross between a giraffe and a zebra, have taken up residence in the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 's giraffe house. The two okapi are half-brothers, on loan from the Dallas Zoo. Askari (ahz-kar-ee) is almost two years old, while Magani (mah-gah-nee) is one. They arrived at the zoo on Oct. 18. "The two arrived in fine shape after their 16-hour ride from Dallas to Baltimore," Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator, said in a press release.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Behold the snuggling! It can't be easy for a creature with a neck like a crane to manage a snuggle. But this mama giraffe is doing it, all in the name of motherhood. The mother and baby giraffes live at the Tama Zoological Park in Tokyo. The baby giraffe was born on August 6 at the zoo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Zoe, a 16-year-old giraffe at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , died Thursday after receiving anesthesia during a medical procedure. The reticulated giraffe was a favorite of visitors who occasionally were allowed to feed her "We are stunned by the sudden loss," Zoo president Don Hutchinson said in a news release. "Zoe was truly part of our zoo family. " Zoe was anesthetized while getting her hooves trimmed — a procedure that is medically necessary to prevent overgrown toenails from becoming painful, and interfering with a giraffe's ability to walk.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Mary, the 24-year-old matriarch of the Maryland Zoo's giraffe herd, was euthanized Tuesday following a three-year bout with arthritis. "About two and a half years ago, she started showing signs of arthritis," zoo spokeswoman Jane Ballentine said. "The staff worked to manage her pain, keep her comfortable. But a few weeks ago, she seemed to become more uncomfortable, shifting her weight from leg to leg. "Her condition progressed very rapidly," she added. "As the days went on, they realized the treatments they were using just really weren't working for Mary.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | November 7, 2001
The giraffe is the tallest animal in the world. When it drinks, the giraffe has to spread its front legs far apart to lower its neck to the water. The giraffe's tail is used to keep away flies. The animal's sharp hearing, eyesight and towering height help it keep watch for danger. What's for DINNER? With its long neck and tongue, the giraffe eats the highest leaves on trees found throughout Africa. Do you KNOW? Do giraffe have horns? Answer: Yes! Giraffes are born with horns that are covered with skin and hair.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
I was utterly thrilled by your story about the new animals arriving at the zoo ("Maryland Zoo welcomes new lioness, giraffe," Dec. 3). However, I wish there had been as much in the article about the lioness, such as her age and weight, as there was about the giraffe. For a while, I have been going to the National Zoo in Washington because I felt that the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore was not doing anything new. it was the same-old, same-old that I've seen since I was little. However, with the new animals arriving I will be going to the Maryland Zoo once more.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
An okapi, an African animal related to giraffes, died Saturday night after digestive problems, the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Monday. Karen, who was 6 years old, stopped eating last week, said Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator. Okapi (pronounced oh-KAH-pee) have short reddish-brown coats and white stripes, and are usually found in the forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo. A necropsy to determine the cause of death will be performed, but officials believe she was having a "gut stasis" issue, McClure said.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
The kids didn't seem to mind, but mom was a nervous wreck. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 's five-week-old baby warthogs, named Kirby and Cecil in an online poll that attracted some 1,300 votes, had their official coming-out party Tuesday morning. While the two boy hogs were content to simply hang together in the back of their enclosure, mom Kumari was clearly a wreck, pacing back and forth ceaselessly, casting worried glances at the assembled humans, acting for all the world more like an expectant father than a proud mama.
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