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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
In the small, northern Italian town of Piacenza, a young man by the name of Giorgio Armani dropped out of college in 1957, and the fashion world hasn't been the same since. Since that day, Armani's name has become so synonymous with high fashion and chic couture that it's hard to believe his $288 million empire has only been around 25 years. But this year, the designer is celebrating the 25th anniversary of founding his own company, and he's doing so with his customary panache. Armani not only has expanded his business this year by introducing cosmetics and home furnishings lines in Europe that will hit U.S. stores next year.
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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
Virginia Hogan is more interested in style than in fashion. "I love putting things together my own way. I don't want to look like somebody else," says the 59-year-old concert pianist. When we "Glimpsed" the Cockeysville resident at The Center Club, she equated her taste in designer clothes to the standards of her profession. "I don't spend money on things that don't have quality. I'm a Steinway artist. I only play on Steinway [pianos] because Steinway is the real thing. ... I'm not a snob.
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By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | May 2, 1991
We average, struggling working persons may wonder just what the other half finds to spend, spend, spend its money on.We of the working press don't have firsthand knowledge, but we have friends in high places who say clothes and jewelry.Harry Winston, that high-society jeweler with boutiques in New York and Beverly Hills, has taken upscale that item common to the streets and playgrounds -- the whistle.The new bejeweled whistle is created in 18-karat gold, adorned with malachite, coral, turquoise, black onyx, amethyst, rubies or sapphires and sells for $5,700.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 11, 2009
No surprise that the prosecutor who's been dogging Sheila Dixon for years thinks she's corrupt. The real shocker, if her indictment is to be believed, is that Sheila Dixon thinks Sheila Dixon is corrupt. Dixon might have looked dirty to most of us for allegedly taking lavish gifts from a developer and giving him big city tax breaks, but I'd always imagined that her conscience was clear. Blind to conflicts of interest? You bet. Conscious of them? Self-conscious about them?
FEATURES
March 26, 1996
Sleek, shiny and bare was the unofficial dress code for women at the 68th Academy awards ceremony last night. Pale, shimmery fabrics in white, silver or blue were the norm, with several standout gowns in brown satin, but not for actress Sharon Stone. Departing from the predictable fashion again this year, she covered up in a black mockturtleneck and black velvet coat. The men showed their fashion flair with elongated jackets, distinctive vests (Mel Gibson wore his family's Buchanan tartan under his black Armani tux)
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1994
Calvin Klein has hired Gabriella Forte, one of Italy's most powerful fashion executives, to be president and chief operating officer of Calvin Klein Inc.Ms. Forte, who was executive vice president of Giorgio Armani and head of its U.S. operations, is so closely linked to Mr. Armani that she often spoke for him in the first person. As Mr. Armani's right hand, Ms. Forte personified the tough and articulate buffer needed by creative personalities whose names are on labels."I think the position that was offered me was very exciting," said Ms. Forte, calling from Milan.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
Virginia Hogan is more interested in style than in fashion. "I love putting things together my own way. I don't want to look like somebody else," says the 59-year-old concert pianist. When we "Glimpsed" the Cockeysville resident at The Center Club, she equated her taste in designer clothes to the standards of her profession. "I don't spend money on things that don't have quality. I'm a Steinway artist. I only play on Steinway [pianos] because Steinway is the real thing. ... I'm not a snob.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 17, 1997
My boyfriend invited me to a fancy movie premiere in London. I've never been to anything like this before, and I am so excited.He says it will be quite casual, and I am at a loss as to what to wear. "Casual" to me means jeans.I know he plans to wear his new Armani jacket with a mock turtleneck and slacks. I want to look chic and elegant but not overdressed.What should I wear?For advice I called Milan and put the question to Giorgio Armani himself. He agrees that being overdressed is the opposite of chic.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | March 22, 1994
Praise be for some fashion lights at last night's 66th annual Academy Awards. We were getting worried after last year's lack of luster.In recent years, Oscar night gawking has disappointed -- too much black, too much simple. The spark kicked in when mistress of ceremonies Whoopi Goldberg made her entrance in an empire-waisted garnet velvet gown. Go girl! And with a train yet.Publicity blurbs said Whoopi would wear an androgynous tux, shirt and tie by Giorgio Armani. We love a surprise. The Oscars were off to a good fashion start.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
For Diane Weiss, the rules are the same whether you're dressing a room or dressing yourself."When a women walks into a room, nothing should stand out -- not her lipstick, not her hair. She should walk in as a lovely picture to look at. I design the same way," says the 48-year-old interior designer with Louis Mazor Inc.In between decorating and running her own home in Lutherville, she volunteers with the Festival of Trees. For the last 11 years, she's been involved in the benefit for the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which begins Sunday and runs through Dec. 13 at Festival Hall.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
In the small, northern Italian town of Piacenza, a young man by the name of Giorgio Armani dropped out of college in 1957, and the fashion world hasn't been the same since. Since that day, Armani's name has become so synonymous with high fashion and chic couture that it's hard to believe his $288 million empire has only been around 25 years. But this year, the designer is celebrating the 25th anniversary of founding his own company, and he's doing so with his customary panache. Armani not only has expanded his business this year by introducing cosmetics and home furnishings lines in Europe that will hit U.S. stores next year.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 17, 1997
My boyfriend invited me to a fancy movie premiere in London. I've never been to anything like this before, and I am so excited.He says it will be quite casual, and I am at a loss as to what to wear. "Casual" to me means jeans.I know he plans to wear his new Armani jacket with a mock turtleneck and slacks. I want to look chic and elegant but not overdressed.What should I wear?For advice I called Milan and put the question to Giorgio Armani himself. He agrees that being overdressed is the opposite of chic.
FEATURES
March 26, 1996
Sleek, shiny and bare was the unofficial dress code for women at the 68th Academy awards ceremony last night. Pale, shimmery fabrics in white, silver or blue were the norm, with several standout gowns in brown satin, but not for actress Sharon Stone. Departing from the predictable fashion again this year, she covered up in a black mockturtleneck and black velvet coat. The men showed their fashion flair with elongated jackets, distinctive vests (Mel Gibson wore his family's Buchanan tartan under his black Armani tux)
FEATURES
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,Los Angeles Times | March 20, 1995
If women in Hollywood have made any inroads into what has always been a man's world -- and empirical evidence says they have -- you certainly wouldn't know it by picking up the latest copy of Vanity Fair.Outraged industry folks -- males as well as females -- say the magazine's current special issue on Hollywood is sexist and demeaning to women, who are largely depicted in suggestive high-fashion undergarments, or high-fashion designer-wear made to look like undergarments.A group photo of top screenwriters overlooks women altogether.
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1994
Calvin Klein has hired Gabriella Forte, one of Italy's most powerful fashion executives, to be president and chief operating officer of Calvin Klein Inc.Ms. Forte, who was executive vice president of Giorgio Armani and head of its U.S. operations, is so closely linked to Mr. Armani that she often spoke for him in the first person. As Mr. Armani's right hand, Ms. Forte personified the tough and articulate buffer needed by creative personalities whose names are on labels."I think the position that was offered me was very exciting," said Ms. Forte, calling from Milan.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | March 22, 1994
Praise be for some fashion lights at last night's 66th annual Academy Awards. We were getting worried after last year's lack of luster.In recent years, Oscar night gawking has disappointed -- too much black, too much simple. The spark kicked in when mistress of ceremonies Whoopi Goldberg made her entrance in an empire-waisted garnet velvet gown. Go girl! And with a train yet.Publicity blurbs said Whoopi would wear an androgynous tux, shirt and tie by Giorgio Armani. We love a surprise. The Oscars were off to a good fashion start.
FEATURES
By KIM TRAVERSO | October 10, 1991
It looks like designers are finally coming down to earth.The clothes of haute couture creators like Giorgio Armani and Emanuel Ungaro are becoming more accessible to those of us who can't shell out big bucks for an outfit.Instead of paying thousands to own a garment with a Giorgio Armani label, it'll soon be possible to buy an Armani sweater for no more than $50. And while Emanuel Ungaro dresses can cost $5,000 apiece, in his new Emanuel line, you can get one for closer to $500.A few secondary lines, such as Donna Karan's DKNY, have been around for several years, but the weak economy of recent times has caused their numbers to explode.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times | December 23, 1993
The scenario goes like this: Thousands of last-minute shoppers rush to fragrance counters and snap up bottles of perfume, toilet water and after-shave for everyone on their lists.That's the vision dancing in the heads of fragrance executives and retailers these days, and it's not entirely far-fetched.Traditionally, 60 percent of the year's fragrance sales are made between Thanksgiving and Christmas. And 75 percent of them are to men buying gifts for women.Maybe he can't afford a diamond ring, but how about a $40 bottle of Elizabeth Taylor's White Diamonds?
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
If you're looking for David Lowry at Heartfest next Saturday, he'll be the one in the navy blazer, gabardine trousers and maroon tie.OK, so maybe that won't set him apart from other well-dressed men at the benefit for Johns Hopkins Hospital's Henry Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. But no matter, says Mr. Lowry, the center's senior clinical program coordinator.When it comes to clothes, he sticks with the classics, letting the bold dressers break in the trends.Mr. Lowry, 32, credits his wife Helene with perfecting his taste, though.
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