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By Mary Carole McCauley | October 24, 2002
American Book Award winner and former businessman Dana Gioia will be nominated to head the National Endowment for the Arts, President Bush announced yesterday. Although the appointment must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Gioia's nomination has been long-awaited. The NEA has been rudderless since its previous chairman, Michael Hammond, died Jan. 29, six days into the job. Gioia's background is extremely varied. His lengthy experience in the private sector may appeal to fiscal conservatives; arts advocates could be drawn to his literary credentials.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 1, 2008
It was a painful moment for Baltimore's chief narcotics prosecutor when he recently dismissed drug-dealing charges against three men and said in court that they were not guilty. Assistant State's Attorney Antonio Gioia later said the case was tainted by dishonest police work by two veteran police officers, who he believes lied in court documents to justify the arrests, and at least two others. Concerned that the Baltimore Police Department was slow to act, Gioia and his team of prosecutors launched their own investigation into Detective Deryl Turner and Sgt. Allen Adkins.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 13, 2004
If anyone knows how to begin an ambitious project, Dana Gioia thinks, Virgil does. In medias res. "In the middle of things." Rocking back on his heels, his arms crossed over his chest like a gladiator, Gioia for a moment silently contemplates the implications of that phrase. Then, he spells them out for employees of the National Endowment for the Arts, who are holding a noon-hour meeting of their book club. This session is devoted to contemplating the wonders of the great Roman poet's 2,085-year-old masterpiece, The Aeneid.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
The questions posed yesterday by the West Baltimore Middle School pupils were as simple as, "What would happen if my friend stole a car?" and as profound as, "Are schools really desegregated?" The answers came from the likes of Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the state's highest court; Gilbert A. Holmes, dean of the University of Baltimore law school; and Marcella A. Holland, administrative judge of Baltimore Circuit Court. "Going into classrooms is so important," Bell said. "And it's one of my favorite things to do."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 28, 2003
Dana Gioia has a hard time keeping his mouth shut. The National Book Award-winning poet has a penchant for bold, splashy statements that tip over the establishment wheelbarrow and get people riled up. So what's he doing as head of the National Endowment for the Arts -- surely one of the most politically sensitive jobs in the land? Gioia, 52, leans forward, smiles widely and says, "I promise to do my best to be a very good boy," a statement that, with its air of playful mockery, simultaneously makes a guarantee and takes it away.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | January 31, 2003
Dana Gioia, a National Book Award-winning poet and businessman, will come to Washington early next month to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Gioia's appointment was confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, a year to the day his predecessor, Michael P. Hammond, died unexpectedly after just one week on the job. "I am honored by the Senate's vote of confirmation. Now I am eager to get started," Gioia said in a news release. "Leading the National Endowment for the Arts is a great privilege and an enormous responsibility.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
A defense attorney yesterday said prosecutors are trying to convict the wrong person in the killing of a Towson State University student two years ago, and painted his client as a man too busy trying to get into college himself to become involved in a fatal robbery.Defense attorney Antonio Gioia told a jury in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday in opening statements that Davon Neverdon, now 20, did not fire the gun that killed 21-year-old Joel J. Lee, a computer science major who was about to start his senior year.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 1, 2008
It was a painful moment for Baltimore's chief narcotics prosecutor when he recently dismissed drug-dealing charges against three men and said in court that they were not guilty. Assistant State's Attorney Antonio Gioia later said the case was tainted by dishonest police work by two veteran police officers, who he believes lied in court documents to justify the arrests, and at least two others. Concerned that the Baltimore Police Department was slow to act, Gioia and his team of prosecutors launched their own investigation into Detective Deryl Turner and Sgt. Allen Adkins.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
One of Baltimore's most high-profile child sex-abuse cases resurfaced yesterday in Circuit Court after 10 years, as the credibility of ferocious defense lawyer M. Cristina Gutierrez - disbarred and now deceased - was essentially on trial. Lawyers for Catholic school teacher John Joseph Merzbacher, 62, argued yesterday in a post-conviction hearing that Gutierrez did not adequately represent Merzbacher at his trial in 1995. At the end of the hearing, presiding Judge John N. Prevas said he would issue an opinion to Maryland's Court of Special Appeals, which asked Prevas to revisit the issue.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
The questions posed yesterday by the West Baltimore Middle School pupils were as simple as, "What would happen if my friend stole a car?" and as profound as, "Are schools really desegregated?" The answers came from the likes of Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the state's highest court; Gilbert A. Holmes, dean of the University of Baltimore law school; and Marcella A. Holland, administrative judge of Baltimore Circuit Court. "Going into classrooms is so important," Bell said. "And it's one of my favorite things to do."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 13, 2004
If anyone knows how to begin an ambitious project, Dana Gioia thinks, Virgil does. In medias res. "In the middle of things." Rocking back on his heels, his arms crossed over his chest like a gladiator, Gioia for a moment silently contemplates the implications of that phrase. Then, he spells them out for employees of the National Endowment for the Arts, who are holding a noon-hour meeting of their book club. This session is devoted to contemplating the wonders of the great Roman poet's 2,085-year-old masterpiece, The Aeneid.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
One of Baltimore's most high-profile child sex-abuse cases resurfaced yesterday in Circuit Court after 10 years, as the credibility of ferocious defense lawyer M. Cristina Gutierrez - disbarred and now deceased - was essentially on trial. Lawyers for Catholic school teacher John Joseph Merzbacher, 62, argued yesterday in a post-conviction hearing that Gutierrez did not adequately represent Merzbacher at his trial in 1995. At the end of the hearing, presiding Judge John N. Prevas said he would issue an opinion to Maryland's Court of Special Appeals, which asked Prevas to revisit the issue.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 28, 2003
Dana Gioia has a hard time keeping his mouth shut. The National Book Award-winning poet has a penchant for bold, splashy statements that tip over the establishment wheelbarrow and get people riled up. So what's he doing as head of the National Endowment for the Arts -- surely one of the most politically sensitive jobs in the land? Gioia, 52, leans forward, smiles widely and says, "I promise to do my best to be a very good boy," a statement that, with its air of playful mockery, simultaneously makes a guarantee and takes it away.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | January 31, 2003
Dana Gioia, a National Book Award-winning poet and businessman, will come to Washington early next month to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Gioia's appointment was confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, a year to the day his predecessor, Michael P. Hammond, died unexpectedly after just one week on the job. "I am honored by the Senate's vote of confirmation. Now I am eager to get started," Gioia said in a news release. "Leading the National Endowment for the Arts is a great privilege and an enormous responsibility.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | October 24, 2002
American Book Award winner and former businessman Dana Gioia will be nominated to head the National Endowment for the Arts, President Bush announced yesterday. Although the appointment must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Gioia's nomination has been long-awaited. The NEA has been rudderless since its previous chairman, Michael Hammond, died Jan. 29, six days into the job. Gioia's background is extremely varied. His lengthy experience in the private sector may appeal to fiscal conservatives; arts advocates could be drawn to his literary credentials.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
A defense attorney yesterday said prosecutors are trying to convict the wrong person in the killing of a Towson State University student two years ago, and painted his client as a man too busy trying to get into college himself to become involved in a fatal robbery.Defense attorney Antonio Gioia told a jury in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday in opening statements that Davon Neverdon, now 20, did not fire the gun that killed 21-year-old Joel J. Lee, a computer science major who was about to start his senior year.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
A Baltimore man described as "a major player" in the city's heroin trade pleaded guilty to being a drug kingpin yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court, nearly two years after he was the subject of a wiretap investigation. Prosecutors said Frank Eubanks Jr., 33, was directing the sale of as much as $150,000 worth of heroin in Baltimore a week. Eubanks, of the 600 block of N. Woodington Road, was sentenced to 20 years in prison without parole by Judge John N. Prevas. He was selling "wholesale quantities" of heroin from places such as New York to other street dealers in the city, said Assistant State's Attorney Antonio Gioia, one of several prosecutors in the case.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
A man accused of murdering Towson State University student Joel J. Lee was acquitted of all charges yesterday by a Baltimore jury, outraging the victim's Korean-born parents and prompting them to blame racism for the not guilty verdicts.Davon A. Neverdon, 20, could have received a sentence of life in prison without parole if he had been convicted.At one point before the trial, Mr. Neverdon's attorney approached prosecutors about his client possibly pleading guilty return for a sentence of life with all but 40 years suspended, according to the attorney and prosecutors.
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