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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
Two years to the day after Ginza Japanese Steak House opened in Cockeysville (Dec. 6, 2000), another Ginza opened, in Owings Mills. Manager Lily Zhao says customers at the new place have several choices when it comes to seating -- and eating. You can choose to sit in the tableside-cooking section, where chairs are arranged around nine Japanese grills. You can sit at the sushi bar. Or you can sit at regular dining tables. And did we mention the tatami room, where as many as 10 people can sit on floor cushions around a low table?
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 26, 2003
Whoever first thought up the concept of bringing Japanese steakhouses to middle America was a genius. The experience was weird enough to be fun -- Eating iceberg lettuce salads with chopsticks! Watching the hibachi chef twirl his knives! -- while still involving large amounts of steak, chicken, shrimp, lobster, butter, salt and drinks with little umbrellas in them. It was a slippery slope. First, Americans were lured into trying some other Asian cooking besides pork fried rice. Next thing you know, we're eating raw fish layered with seaweed and rice and drinking sake.
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 20, 1993
TOKYO -- Underneath all the glamour, the world's most expensive real estate has at least one thing in common with some of the world's worst neighborhoods -- rats.That's no surprise to the man in charge of fighting rats in Tokyo's Ginza, home of the world's highest tax assessments and many of its grandest boutiques, department stores and nightclubs."Ginza is a glorious place with every amenity, and hundreds of thousands of people come here to enjoy tons of food and beverages every day," Keiichi Suzuki said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
Two years to the day after Ginza Japanese Steak House opened in Cockeysville (Dec. 6, 2000), another Ginza opened, in Owings Mills. Manager Lily Zhao says customers at the new place have several choices when it comes to seating -- and eating. You can choose to sit in the tableside-cooking section, where chairs are arranged around nine Japanese grills. You can sit at the sushi bar. Or you can sit at regular dining tables. And did we mention the tatami room, where as many as 10 people can sit on floor cushions around a low table?
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 26, 2003
Whoever first thought up the concept of bringing Japanese steakhouses to middle America was a genius. The experience was weird enough to be fun -- Eating iceberg lettuce salads with chopsticks! Watching the hibachi chef twirl his knives! -- while still involving large amounts of steak, chicken, shrimp, lobster, butter, salt and drinks with little umbrellas in them. It was a slippery slope. First, Americans were lured into trying some other Asian cooking besides pork fried rice. Next thing you know, we're eating raw fish layered with seaweed and rice and drinking sake.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 4, 2001
If there were such a thing as a neighborhood Japanese steakhouse and sushi bar -- the way there are neighborhood restaurants and neighborhood bars -- the new Ginza in Yorktowne Plaza would be it. Ginza is many of the things you don't expect in a Japanese steakhouse: It's low key, with comfortable but not exciting surroundings and easy-listening music in the background. People dress casually to come here, and the place is pretty much unknown outside the immediate neighborhood, or so our hostess told us. Weekends are busy, but weeknights you can eat in relative quiet and then linger over cups of hot, fragrant jasmine tea for as long as you want.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | May 27, 1993
TOKYO -- It sounds like a dream come true. Inheritance brings a big chunk of the most valuable land in the world. Most dreams would call for a life of ease ever after.Real life is different.In real life, the highest-assessed land in the world is in Tokyo's Ginza shopping and nightclub district."The family business has been the soul of Ginza since the end of World War II, but it will be a thing of the past, the victim of Japanese inheritance taxes, in another 10 or 20 years," says Yuuji Ishimaru, head of the Ginza Street Association, the district's equivalent of a chamber of commerce.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 5, 1993
TOKYO -- When the sliver-shaped, post-modern office building went up in Ginza two years ago, there were still lots of people wanting to rent space in Tokyo, but then the bubble burst, rents fell, and one thing followed another, and, well, it's now an old story. Another expensive building went up in a big city only to find the market had changed.But just because people were no longer interested didn't mean there weren't potential tenants, or so, evidently, was the thinking of the landlord.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | November 27, 1993
TOKYO -- Mazda Motor Corp., awash in excess production, has given its 30,000 workers in Japan mandatory extra days off last week and this week, days when they can reflect on a question being asked from Washington to Hiroshima: How bad can the Japanese economy get?Traders in the Japanese financial markets have had a simple answer since September: worse.Wednesday, share prices fell broadly and steeply, continuing a three-month trend. Yesterday, the benchmark Nikkei index plummeted further, hitting a 10-month low. The index ended the week at 16,726.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1996
Streets of gold: Midtown Manhattan still glitters with the world's most expensive rents, a new survey reports. On Fifth Avenue between 49th Street and 57th Street, which boasts jewelers Cartier and Tiffany & Co. and the Trump Tower, space rented last year for $500 a square foot, according to Hirschfeld Group Inc., a retail real estate advisory firm. Second place? 57th Street between Fifth and Madison avenues, home to a Levi Strauss superstore and Warner Brothers Studio Store, with rents at $440 a square foot.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 4, 2001
If there were such a thing as a neighborhood Japanese steakhouse and sushi bar -- the way there are neighborhood restaurants and neighborhood bars -- the new Ginza in Yorktowne Plaza would be it. Ginza is many of the things you don't expect in a Japanese steakhouse: It's low key, with comfortable but not exciting surroundings and easy-listening music in the background. People dress casually to come here, and the place is pretty much unknown outside the immediate neighborhood, or so our hostess told us. Weekends are busy, but weeknights you can eat in relative quiet and then linger over cups of hot, fragrant jasmine tea for as long as you want.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | November 27, 1993
TOKYO -- Mazda Motor Corp., awash in excess production, has given its 30,000 workers in Japan mandatory extra days off last week and this week, days when they can reflect on a question being asked from Washington to Hiroshima: How bad can the Japanese economy get?Traders in the Japanese financial markets have had a simple answer since September: worse.Wednesday, share prices fell broadly and steeply, continuing a three-month trend. Yesterday, the benchmark Nikkei index plummeted further, hitting a 10-month low. The index ended the week at 16,726.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 5, 1993
TOKYO -- When the sliver-shaped, post-modern office building went up in Ginza two years ago, there were still lots of people wanting to rent space in Tokyo, but then the bubble burst, rents fell, and one thing followed another, and, well, it's now an old story. Another expensive building went up in a big city only to find the market had changed.But just because people were no longer interested didn't mean there weren't potential tenants, or so, evidently, was the thinking of the landlord.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | May 27, 1993
TOKYO -- It sounds like a dream come true. Inheritance brings a big chunk of the most valuable land in the world. Most dreams would call for a life of ease ever after.Real life is different.In real life, the highest-assessed land in the world is in Tokyo's Ginza shopping and nightclub district."The family business has been the soul of Ginza since the end of World War II, but it will be a thing of the past, the victim of Japanese inheritance taxes, in another 10 or 20 years," says Yuuji Ishimaru, head of the Ginza Street Association, the district's equivalent of a chamber of commerce.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 20, 1993
TOKYO -- Underneath all the glamour, the world's most expensive real estate has at least one thing in common with some of the world's worst neighborhoods -- rats.That's no surprise to the man in charge of fighting rats in Tokyo's Ginza, home of the world's highest tax assessments and many of its grandest boutiques, department stores and nightclubs."Ginza is a glorious place with every amenity, and hundreds of thousands of people come here to enjoy tons of food and beverages every day," Keiichi Suzuki said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 4, 2001
Tourists will have to go elsewhere for the Inner Harbor's most famous crab cakes now that Phillips' waterfront dining room in the Light Street Pavilion of Harborplace is temporarily closed for renovation. The dining room is scheduled to reopen in February for dinner only; lunch will have to wait until the remodeling is completely finished in another month or so. When the renovation is completed, Phillips will be designed to look like a waterfront Eastern Shore home, with a garden area, patio, parlor and boathouse.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 18, 1993
Tokyo -- Remember the $65 cantaloupes in those late-1980s stories about lavish Japanese department stores? The $750 neckties? The $4,300 designer suits?Well, they're still there, and that's a big problem -- nobody's buying them these days.For four decades, legendary names such as Takashimaya, Isetan and Matsuya presided regally over the retail segment of Japan's postwar "economic miracle." These symbols of extravagance became a "must see" for millions of tourists from the United States and other countries.
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