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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Ginseng, one of the most sought-after medicinal herbs in the world, once flourished across much of Maryland. It has nearly vanished now, though, from all but the westernmost counties, prompting officials to ponder banning commercial harvest of the lucrative plant from all state lands. A recent survey coordinated by Christopher F. Puttock, a research associate with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, found that the cure-all plant known to scientists as Panax quinquefolius has disappeared from spots in the eastern and central parts of Maryland where patches had been seen 30 years ago. Places in Baltimore, Calvert, Harford, Prince George's and Montgomery counties that harbored at least a little wild ginseng a few decades ago now appear to be barren, Puttock said in an interview.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Hoping to save what's left of Maryland's dwindling wild ginseng population, the state has banned collection of the sought-after herb on all state-owned lands. Worried that remaining patches of the slow-growing plant are being stripped from Western Maryland forests by pickers hoping to cash in on its reputed health benefits, the Department of Natural Resources announced this week that harvest would no longer be permitted in state forests or in wildlife management areas. Picking ginseng already was prohibited in state parks.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
Can I take ginseng and Ginkgo biloba at the same time? A friend told me this combination would be helpful for arthritis, boost my energy and improve my concentration and memory. I believe it has done all that, but my blood pressure has been going up. High doses of ginseng have been associated with high blood pressure, nervousness, insomnia, diarrhea and rash. Such side effects seem rare, though. You might want to eliminate the ginseng to see what happens to your blood pressure. We can see no particular reason to avoid the combination of ginkgo and ginseng.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Ginseng, one of the most sought-after medicinal herbs in the world, once flourished across much of Maryland. It has nearly vanished now, though, from all but the westernmost counties, prompting officials to ponder banning commercial harvest of the lucrative plant from all state lands. A recent survey coordinated by Christopher F. Puttock, a research associate with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, found that the cure-all plant known to scientists as Panax quinquefolius has disappeared from spots in the eastern and central parts of Maryland where patches had been seen 30 years ago. Places in Baltimore, Calvert, Harford, Prince George's and Montgomery counties that harbored at least a little wild ginseng a few decades ago now appear to be barren, Puttock said in an interview.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service and the state of Virginia have broken a seven-state ring of poachers and smugglers who have been slaughtering black bears and illegally harvesting ginseng root to sell to Asian markets for use as aphrodisiacs and medicine. The three-year undercover investigation, code-named Viper, centered on rural Elkton, Va., and nearby Shenandoah National Park. To lure the poachers, agents opened a sporting goods store in Elkton, where they met with hunters and poachers trafficking in bear parts and the rare plant, which is an endangered species.
BUSINESS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | February 20, 1993
BERLIN -- At the big electronics plant in east Berlin, Bernhard Doering now takes ginseng tea in the morning with his new Korean colleague, Woongil Kim."It's one of our new tastes," Mr. Doering says.East Berlin's electronics workers have been acquiring these new tastes since Korea's global Samsung conglomerate took control of the plant at the first of the year.Hard work may be one of the new Samsung flavors."If you drink ginseng tea, you can do more work," says Mr. Kim. "Ten hours a day or more."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Simpson and Elizabeth Simpson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - Ginseng, an herbal root used by the Chinese for thousands of years, has been touted as an aphrodisiac, an energy booster, a memory enhancer and a cure-all. Now a Virginia researcher has conducted a scientific study that shows the benefits of ginseng in another arena: preventing the flu and other respiratory viruses. Dr. Janet McElhaney, an associate professor of internal medicine at the Glennan Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, studied the effects of ginseng in 108 elderly residents at a Newport News, Va., assisted-living facility.
NEWS
By Edith Stanley and Edith Stanley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2000
WAYNESVILLE, N.C. -- Bernard Singleton wonders who slipped past his white lattice fence and dug up his garden. His neighbors heard nothing. His dog did not bark. But one night not long ago, someone cleaned him out. The loot: ginseng. Its worth: $2,500. Green gold, they call it. No other herb growing in the woods hereabouts is worth as much. For centuries, Asians have revered its gnarly, pale roots for their supposed invigorating and rejuvenating powers -- so much so that the wild crop in that part of the world is nearly gone.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2003
PHILADELPHIA -- When times are tight, former coal miner Russell "Bud" Bollinger takes a walk through the forest, digging up wild ginseng plants and selling them to make ends meet. The untamed plant has been central Pennsylvania's secret aphrodisiac windfall for generations, bringing in as much as $500 for a pound of roots. But now, Pennsylvania State University, with the help of Bollinger and his buddy Dave Thompson, want "sanging" -- the art of finding and harvesting ginseng plants -- to become a big business.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
HAGERSTOWN -- There's gold in Jim and Gladys Fazenbaker's back yard. On the rocky, wooded slope behind their house near here grows a tiny patch of a nondescript plant, the roots of which could fetch as much as $400 a pound these days.It's ginseng, one of the most sought-after herbal remedies in the world. Prized for centuries in China and other countries as a tonic and stimulant, it can be found by the knowledgeable in the mountains of Western Maryland.The Fazenbakers are practitioners of a fading Appalachian tradition known as "sanging," searching the woods for wild ginseng and digging up the roots for sale or personal use.The patch behind their house is too small to merit harvesting, but the couple say they know of other secluded spots in Allegany, Garrett and Washington counties where they can find several pounds of ginseng roots.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 3, 2007
CHICAGO -- Shark fin soup might taste good. But it won't do much for cancer. Shark cartilage, a widely used alternative therapy for cancer, did not help patients with lung cancer live longer, according to the results of one of the first rigorous studies of the approach. But two smaller studies showed some preliminary but encouraging evidence that two other complementary therapies, ginseng and flaxseed, might have some benefit for cancer patients. The studies were presented yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, where the nation's cancer doctors usually discuss the latest in chemotherapy and new biotechnology drugs.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
STATE DAIRY farmers, tobacco growers and others struggling to pay their bills might want to switch to the production of raspberries or something even more exotic, ginseng, to boost the viability of their farms. That's the suggestion from two recent University of Maryland studies that conclude that the two high-value crops could take the place of other, less-profitable products and significantly boost farm sales. They may also help young people move into farming by offsetting the high cost of land.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service and the state of Virginia have broken a seven-state ring of poachers and smugglers who have been slaughtering black bears and illegally harvesting ginseng root to sell to Asian markets for use as aphrodisiacs and medicine. The three-year undercover investigation, code-named Viper, centered on rural Elkton, Va., and nearby Shenandoah National Park. To lure the poachers, agents opened a sporting goods store in Elkton, where they met with hunters and poachers trafficking in bear parts and the rare plant, which is an endangered species.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2003
PHILADELPHIA -- When times are tight, former coal miner Russell "Bud" Bollinger takes a walk through the forest, digging up wild ginseng plants and selling them to make ends meet. The untamed plant has been central Pennsylvania's secret aphrodisiac windfall for generations, bringing in as much as $500 for a pound of roots. But now, Pennsylvania State University, with the help of Bollinger and his buddy Dave Thompson, want "sanging" -- the art of finding and harvesting ginseng plants -- to become a big business.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
Can I take ginseng and Ginkgo biloba at the same time? A friend told me this combination would be helpful for arthritis, boost my energy and improve my concentration and memory. I believe it has done all that, but my blood pressure has been going up. High doses of ginseng have been associated with high blood pressure, nervousness, insomnia, diarrhea and rash. Such side effects seem rare, though. You might want to eliminate the ginseng to see what happens to your blood pressure. We can see no particular reason to avoid the combination of ginkgo and ginseng.
NEWS
By Jeff Waggoner and Jeff Waggoner,New York Times News Service | February 13, 2000
CAIRO, N.Y. -- It can be worth as much as gold, and it grows. It is American ginseng, a cousin of the aromatic root that has been used by Asians for thousands of years to treat problems including headaches, diabetes and declining male potency. And one man here in the shadows of the Catskills 120 miles north of Manhattan, where the root grows wild on the forest floor, believes that it could be the remedy for the financial headaches of upstate farmers and other landowners. Robert Beyfuss, a Cornell Cooperative Extension agent in Greene County, is on a crusade to make fallow fields and woodlands profitable by persuading people to grow the wild version of American ginseng.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Simpson and Elizabeth Simpson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - Ginseng, an herbal root used by the Chinese for thousands of years, has been touted as an aphrodisiac, an energy booster, a memory enhancer and a cure-all. Now a Virginia researcher has conducted a scientific study that shows the benefits of ginseng in another arena: preventing the flu and other respiratory viruses. Dr. Janet McElhaney, an associate professor of internal medicine at the Glennan Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, studied the effects of ginseng in 108 elderly residents at a Newport News, Va., assisted-living facility.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 17, 2001
Chuck Harris is a Maryland parks ranger, the father of two and a national comic. No foolin'. Harris, whose beat includes the four western counties, is in the funny papers this month, giving advice to the most famous outdoors writer of them all, Mark Trail. For those of you who aren't Trailheads, as fans of the strip are called, the story line to date is that Trail has been assigned to write a story about the poaching of plants from public land. The plant that most intrigues Trail's editor is ginseng.
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