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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 25, 2000
Q. I'm taking aspirin for my heart and ginkgo to help boost my memory. My wife says you have written that this combination is risky. Can you tell me more, so I can decide whether to continue? A. We worry that ginkgo and aspirin could interact to increase the risk of bleeding. Although there have been several cases of hemorrhage with this combination, there has not been a study to determine the significance of this possible complication. In their column, Joe and Teresa Graedon answer letters from readers.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 8, 2004
I suffered from insomnia for three miserable years during menopause. My doctor prescribed Sonata but could not guarantee more than four hours of uninterrupted sleep nightly. I decided not to spend money on a prescription for so little benefit. Over-the-counter sleeping pills didn't agree with me. Then I read in a book on natural health that calcium and magnesium might help. I started taking Citracal Plus with Magnesium. Ever since, I've been sleeping like a baby (a lazy one, mind you, not the colicky kind)
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | January 30, 2000
Q. My mom has become increasingly worried about her memory. She used to keep track of all the birthdays and anniversaries in the family and knew exactly how old all the grandkids and cousins were without writing anything down. Now she makes lists of everything she wants to do for fear she'll forget. She has started taking ginkgo because she heard it's good for memory. Is it safe with her other medications? She takes atenolol, Tylenol PM, amitriptyline and Ticlid. A. There is a chance that your mother's ginkgo might interact with the anti-coagulant Ticlid to increase her risk of hemorrhage.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 11, 2004
You have written about a formula using Listerine for hot spots on dogs. I tried it, and it works great, but we've nearly used it up, and I lost the instructions. Could you give them again? A horse lover shared the following formula she used on the mane and tail of her filly: " 1/3 Listerine (original), 1/3 baby oil and 1/3 water. Put in a spray bottle, shake well and spray it on." This is similar to the formula recommended for dogs' itchy hot spots. We also came across another novel use for Listerine.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 1996
I have just seen an ad for ginkgo biloba on television. This herb is used to increase peripheral circulation and minimize Alzheimer's disease.But what effect will it have when combined with other treatments? My main concern is Coumadin, the blood-thinner I take.Ginkgo has several documented effects on the body. Among them is an ability to reduce the likelihood of blood to clot. Although we do not know of any documented interactions with Coumadin (warfarin), we worry about the possibility of hemorrhage.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2000
Q. In the past few months I have become acutely aware of a ringing in my ears. The doctor says it is tinnitus and there is nothing that can be done to eliminate it. Is it possible that there is a vitamin or herb I can take that would alleviate the problem? You have no idea how disconcerting this noise is. A. There is no cure for ringing in the ears. Some doctors prescribe anti-anxiety agents like Xanax, while others suggest white noise (like static) to mask the sound. We have heard from some readers that ginkgo might be beneficial.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1998
Q. You recently printed a letter from a woman who is taking Paxil and having problems experiencing orgasm. As you noted, this is pretty common.I have been taking Zoloft for obsessive compulsive disorder and had the same problem. My doctor suggested ginkgo. I take 40 milligrams each day and try to take a couple more tablets an hour or two before I think I'll have sex. It really works. I've seen a lot of stuff written about ginkgo, but never this. Please pass it on to your readers!A. As far as we know, there is no scientific research supporting this use of the herb Ginkgo biloba.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 11, 2004
You have written about a formula using Listerine for hot spots on dogs. I tried it, and it works great, but we've nearly used it up, and I lost the instructions. Could you give them again? A horse lover shared the following formula she used on the mane and tail of her filly: " 1/3 Listerine (original), 1/3 baby oil and 1/3 water. Put in a spray bottle, shake well and spray it on." This is similar to the formula recommended for dogs' itchy hot spots. We also came across another novel use for Listerine.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 1999
Q. Do we lose any potency from medicines or vitamins if we swallow them with orange juice? I take Vasotec for blood pressure, vitamin E and a multivitamin. One pharmacist told me I should take them only with water. Another said juice was fine.A. While orange juice may affect some medications (certain anti-biotics and aluminum-containing antacids), it does not interfere with Vasotec.Vitamins will be absorbed well whether taken with juice or water, and minerals such as iron are actually integrated into the body more efficiently with vitamin C found in orange juice.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2000
Q. I am curious about an herbal supplement called Kan Jang (Andrographis paniculata). I have read that it can treat cold symptoms, but I would like your opinion. What do you think of using it for prevention during the cold and flu season? A. Andrographis paniculata is a Chinese herb (chuan xin lian) popular in Scandinavia under the brand name Kan Jang. It is used for preventing as well as treating colds and other upper respiratory infections. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have shown that it lowers fever and relieves symptoms such as sore throat, nasal congestion and tiredness as well as headache.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 13, 2002
Q. I have ginkgo trees in my yard. Can I use their leaves? Store-bought herbs are so pricey. A. To get a reliable product, ginkgo leaves are harvested in the fall and then extracted under controlled conditions. You could pick your own ginkgo leaves, but you would not know how much to take for the results you intend.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 4, 2001
Q. I worry about my memory when I forget a computer password or can't remember someone's name when I see him in the supermarket. I heard that Ginkgo biloba might be beneficial, but when I asked my doctor he discounted it. Is there any research to show that this herb might be helpful? A. A preliminary study in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology (June 2001) demonstrated improved memory and attention in subjects who took a Ginkgo biloba extract for a month. The results of this study reinforce other research suggesting that ginkgo might improve performance on certain tests of memory and information processing.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2000
Q. In the past few months I have become acutely aware of a ringing in my ears. The doctor says it is tinnitus and there is nothing that can be done to eliminate it. Is it possible that there is a vitamin or herb I can take that would alleviate the problem? You have no idea how disconcerting this noise is. A. There is no cure for ringing in the ears. Some doctors prescribe anti-anxiety agents like Xanax, while others suggest white noise (like static) to mask the sound. We have heard from some readers that ginkgo might be beneficial.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 25, 2000
Q. I'm taking aspirin for my heart and ginkgo to help boost my memory. My wife says you have written that this combination is risky. Can you tell me more, so I can decide whether to continue? A. We worry that ginkgo and aspirin could interact to increase the risk of bleeding. Although there have been several cases of hemorrhage with this combination, there has not been a study to determine the significance of this possible complication. In their column, Joe and Teresa Graedon answer letters from readers.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2000
Q. I am curious about an herbal supplement called Kan Jang (Andrographis paniculata). I have read that it can treat cold symptoms, but I would like your opinion. What do you think of using it for prevention during the cold and flu season? A. Andrographis paniculata is a Chinese herb (chuan xin lian) popular in Scandinavia under the brand name Kan Jang. It is used for preventing as well as treating colds and other upper respiratory infections. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have shown that it lowers fever and relieves symptoms such as sore throat, nasal congestion and tiredness as well as headache.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | January 30, 2000
Q. My mom has become increasingly worried about her memory. She used to keep track of all the birthdays and anniversaries in the family and knew exactly how old all the grandkids and cousins were without writing anything down. Now she makes lists of everything she wants to do for fear she'll forget. She has started taking ginkgo because she heard it's good for memory. Is it safe with her other medications? She takes atenolol, Tylenol PM, amitriptyline and Ticlid. A. There is a chance that your mother's ginkgo might interact with the anti-coagulant Ticlid to increase her risk of hemorrhage.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 8, 2004
I suffered from insomnia for three miserable years during menopause. My doctor prescribed Sonata but could not guarantee more than four hours of uninterrupted sleep nightly. I decided not to spend money on a prescription for so little benefit. Over-the-counter sleeping pills didn't agree with me. Then I read in a book on natural health that calcium and magnesium might help. I started taking Citracal Plus with Magnesium. Ever since, I've been sleeping like a baby (a lazy one, mind you, not the colicky kind)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun King Features Syndicate | June 21, 1998
Q.I have noticed that my joints hurt less when I am using aspartame. At first I thought it was just a coincidence, but I am now convinced that Equal relieves my arthritis.A.Aspartame (Equal) appears to have analgesic activity. A report in May's Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics demonstrated significant relief from arthritis pain with aspartame compared to placebo. Researchers gave arthritis sufferers either four or eight tablets (totaling 76 or 152 milligrams) of the sweetener.Aspartame appears to have some aspirin-like effects on bleeding and fever as well.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 1999
Q. Do we lose any potency from medicines or vitamins if we swallow them with orange juice? I take Vasotec for blood pressure, vitamin E and a multivitamin. One pharmacist told me I should take them only with water. Another said juice was fine.A. While orange juice may affect some medications (certain anti-biotics and aluminum-containing antacids), it does not interfere with Vasotec.Vitamins will be absorbed well whether taken with juice or water, and minerals such as iron are actually integrated into the body more efficiently with vitamin C found in orange juice.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1998
Q. You recently printed a letter from a woman who is taking Paxil and having problems experiencing orgasm. As you noted, this is pretty common.I have been taking Zoloft for obsessive compulsive disorder and had the same problem. My doctor suggested ginkgo. I take 40 milligrams each day and try to take a couple more tablets an hour or two before I think I'll have sex. It really works. I've seen a lot of stuff written about ginkgo, but never this. Please pass it on to your readers!A. As far as we know, there is no scientific research supporting this use of the herb Ginkgo biloba.
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