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By SYLVIA BADGER | December 4, 1992
In yesterday's Today section, the incorrect date was given for the Pearl Harbor ceremony aboard the Coast Guard cutter Taney at the Inner Harbor. The event will be held at noon Monday at Pier Four to commemorate the 51st anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing.The Sun regrets the errors.Hollywood legend Ginger Rogers will appear in the flesh and on screen at the Senator Theatre Monday evening. The occasion is a benefit for the newly opened Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center for Retired Persons at the Govans Presbyterian Church, next to the theater.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | March 31, 2010
It is spring glorious spring (da do ron ron ron da do ron ron), and our gallant president has rallied his fractious forces against wacko demagoguery, the crocuses are up, and birds are returning from the South, preferring to raise their children here in Minnesota where we pull our pants on one leg at a time and not all at once. Some people in Washington haven't managed to get their pants on in years. Slowly, slowly, the simple fact dawns on the electorate that the Democrats have passed a moderate Republican health care reform.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 27, 1995
Unabomber demands our attention. He resents the distraction of John Doe No. 2. Humor him (or her, or them).Republicans are rethinking their passion for assault rifles. About time.Big-mouthed, ignorant, bigoted, abusive, rabble-rousing, hate-mongering know-nothings don't bomb public places. Bombers do.A special corner of ballroom dance heaven was reserved just for Ginger Rogers.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 18, 2000
For all the uproar that Spike Jonze's campaign video for Al Gore has created, one would think that this is the first time a Hollywood director has ever plied his trade in the service of Washington's myth-making machinery. In fact, politicians have used up-to-the-minute media to burnish their image at least as far back as the cave drawing at Lasceaux, which no doubt only slightly exaggerated the hunting prowess of that community's Alpha Male (or a candidate for Alpha Male). From those ancient glyphs to classical painting and sculpture to Mathew Brady's Civil War-era photographs, politicians have always wooed the premiere artists of the day to help get their faces - or, more important, their right faces - in the public eye. Abraham Lincoln was only half-joking when he admitted that Brady's iconic portrait helped him win the White House.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 1, 1995
A WOMAN colleague challenged me: "You say you are a big feminist, so why haven't you written a column about Ginger Rogers, as you did about Fred Astaire when he died?"And I said, "Don't you worry your pretty little head about it, sugar," as I pinched her cheek and patted -- "No! NO! Just kidding! JUST KIDDING!! I am a great supporter of the women's movement. I would never behave that way.Now, it's true, I did write a laudatory obituary tribute to Fred Astaire. I identify with him. Surely you have noticed that the charm, wit, cleverness, elegance, playfulness and gentleness of this column derive from his style?
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 27, 1995
The last place I wanted to be confined was an Eastern High School classroom on a Saturday afternoon in 1968.It was January and one of the rituals that high school seniors endured -- then as now -- was the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the almighty SAT, which opens the door to college.I wasn't an Eastern student. In fact, I did not know anybody in the room. These tests were administered at selected sites, and you took it at the place most convenient to your home.Where did I want to be?Where did I cut out to go?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
A couple of football giants are subjects of magazine shows tonight, for vastly different reasons; and Maryland Public Television offers a clever but seldom seen Ginger Rogers movie.* "Dateline NBC" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Bob Costas interviews retired football quarterback Joe Montana, who plans to become a broadcaster. Katie Couric also takes a look at the making of "Pocahontas," the latest Disney money-making machine. NBC.* "NBA Basketball Finals" (9 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 12, 2000
Once again this year, cable's Turner Classic Movies is devoting its March schedule to Oscar-winning and Oscar-nominated films. Sometimes, that's not a good thing -- for God's sake, how many more times can you watch "Ben-Hur?" But examine the schedule closely, and there are some unexpected gems to be found. This year, TCM's added a twist: each film is somehow related to the next, sharing a common actor, director or writer. Trying to figure out how the films are connected can become something of a parlor game, so give it a try. Here are a few of this week's more noteworthy offerings: * Judy Garland stars in director George Cukor's 1950 remake of "A Star Is Born" (7:30 a.m. Monday)
NEWS
December 14, 1992
What's this? The low-profile Weinberg Foundation in the limelight at the Senator Theater to share the stage with Ginger Rogers? Yes, it happened last week to celebrate the opening of the new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Senior Center at the Govans Presbyterian Church. Representing the $8 billion foundation, one of the largest in the country, was its director, Bernard Siegel, who exulted in the conversion of "a dream into a magnificent reality."The dream has been a triangular affair involving Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the city's Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, the long-established Govans church and the late Jewish philanthropist, Harry Weinberg, who had long been concerned with the plight of old people.
NEWS
April 27, 1995
SIGN in a coffee bar:Life is shortDon't sleep through it* * *GINGER ROGERS, who died this week at the age of 83, will no doubt be remembered best for her dance partnership with Fred Astaire, who died in 1987.A few quotations from Ms. Rogers' 1991 biography, "Ginger: My Story," help recall a long and lustrous show business career:* "While our union (Astaire-Rogers) had a special kind of magic and produced a unique enchantment, it was not the be-all and end-all of my career. . . . Fred and I were colleagues, and despite occasional snits . . . we worked together beautifully.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 12, 2000
Once again this year, cable's Turner Classic Movies is devoting its March schedule to Oscar-winning and Oscar-nominated films. Sometimes, that's not a good thing -- for God's sake, how many more times can you watch "Ben-Hur?" But examine the schedule closely, and there are some unexpected gems to be found. This year, TCM's added a twist: each film is somehow related to the next, sharing a common actor, director or writer. Trying to figure out how the films are connected can become something of a parlor game, so give it a try. Here are a few of this week's more noteworthy offerings: * Judy Garland stars in director George Cukor's 1950 remake of "A Star Is Born" (7:30 a.m. Monday)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
A couple of football giants are subjects of magazine shows tonight, for vastly different reasons; and Maryland Public Television offers a clever but seldom seen Ginger Rogers movie.* "Dateline NBC" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Bob Costas interviews retired football quarterback Joe Montana, who plans to become a broadcaster. Katie Couric also takes a look at the making of "Pocahontas," the latest Disney money-making machine. NBC.* "NBA Basketball Finals" (9 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 1, 1995
A WOMAN colleague challenged me: "You say you are a big feminist, so why haven't you written a column about Ginger Rogers, as you did about Fred Astaire when he died?"And I said, "Don't you worry your pretty little head about it, sugar," as I pinched her cheek and patted -- "No! NO! Just kidding! JUST KIDDING!! I am a great supporter of the women's movement. I would never behave that way.Now, it's true, I did write a laudatory obituary tribute to Fred Astaire. I identify with him. Surely you have noticed that the charm, wit, cleverness, elegance, playfulness and gentleness of this column derive from his style?
NEWS
April 27, 1995
SIGN in a coffee bar:Life is shortDon't sleep through it* * *GINGER ROGERS, who died this week at the age of 83, will no doubt be remembered best for her dance partnership with Fred Astaire, who died in 1987.A few quotations from Ms. Rogers' 1991 biography, "Ginger: My Story," help recall a long and lustrous show business career:* "While our union (Astaire-Rogers) had a special kind of magic and produced a unique enchantment, it was not the be-all and end-all of my career. . . . Fred and I were colleagues, and despite occasional snits . . . we worked together beautifully.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 27, 1995
The last place I wanted to be confined was an Eastern High School classroom on a Saturday afternoon in 1968.It was January and one of the rituals that high school seniors endured -- then as now -- was the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the almighty SAT, which opens the door to college.I wasn't an Eastern student. In fact, I did not know anybody in the room. These tests were administered at selected sites, and you took it at the place most convenient to your home.Where did I want to be?Where did I cut out to go?
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 27, 1995
Unabomber demands our attention. He resents the distraction of John Doe No. 2. Humor him (or her, or them).Republicans are rethinking their passion for assault rifles. About time.Big-mouthed, ignorant, bigoted, abusive, rabble-rousing, hate-mongering know-nothings don't bomb public places. Bombers do.A special corner of ballroom dance heaven was reserved just for Ginger Rogers.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Memo from Ginger Rogers to Macaulay Culkin: Keep up th good work, kid.The Hollywood legend who never made a move the camera didn't like condemns most movies today as "sordid and ugly," but gives a rare thumbs up to "Home Alone" and can't wait to see the sequel.As for the pint-sized actor, she says, "He has a good chance to be a very credible actor in the film business."Ms. Rogers' own accomplishments were celebrated over the weekend when she and several other stars received annual awards from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington for their contribution to the country's cultural life.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Washington -- If this were England, Joanne Woodward mused they would be knighted. But this being America, they were simply -- and more democratically -- honored.But this also being Washington circa the Bush-Clinton transition, this year's Kennedy Center Honors -- celebrated this weekend by a head-turning celebrity crowd flocking to a city that usually makes do with committee chairmen and undersecretaries for its people-spotting -- seems more big-D Democratic than little-D democratic. Not only is any arts gathering assumed to be more Democrat-leaning, the annual Kennedy Center honors first were held in 1978 -- during the last period the big-Ds were in the Big Time.
NEWS
December 14, 1992
What's this? The low-profile Weinberg Foundation in the limelight at the Senator Theater to share the stage with Ginger Rogers? Yes, it happened last week to celebrate the opening of the new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Senior Center at the Govans Presbyterian Church. Representing the $8 billion foundation, one of the largest in the country, was its director, Bernard Siegel, who exulted in the conversion of "a dream into a magnificent reality."The dream has been a triangular affair involving Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the city's Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, the long-established Govans church and the late Jewish philanthropist, Harry Weinberg, who had long been concerned with the plight of old people.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Memo from Ginger Rogers to Macaulay Culkin: Keep up th good work, kid.The Hollywood legend who never made a move the camera didn't like condemns most movies today as "sordid and ugly," but gives a rare thumbs up to "Home Alone" and can't wait to see the sequel.As for the pint-sized actor, she says, "He has a good chance to be a very credible actor in the film business."Ms. Rogers' own accomplishments were celebrated over the weekend when she and several other stars received annual awards from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington for their contribution to the country's cultural life.
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