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Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Maryland, meet Comptroller Peter Franchot's newest gimmick to convince you to collect more than $980 million in unclaimed property: Sherlock Franchot. This year's tongue-in-cheek campaign features Franchot as the beloved British detective Sherlock Holmes, complete with a calabash pipe, deerstalker hat and an "elementary" catch phrase. The campaign to reunite residents with lost property, waged every year, comes with a 151-page tabloid put in local newspapers that lists the tens of thousands of people whose lost cash and property ends up in the hands of the state of Maryland.  It also comes with a spoof YouTube video that opens with a deep movie-trailer voice.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Maryland, meet Comptroller Peter Franchot's newest gimmick to convince you to collect more than $980 million in unclaimed property: Sherlock Franchot. This year's tongue-in-cheek campaign features Franchot as the beloved British detective Sherlock Holmes, complete with a calabash pipe, deerstalker hat and an "elementary" catch phrase. The campaign to reunite residents with lost property, waged every year, comes with a 151-page tabloid put in local newspapers that lists the tens of thousands of people whose lost cash and property ends up in the hands of the state of Maryland.  It also comes with a spoof YouTube video that opens with a deep movie-trailer voice.
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FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1994
They can't be serious, can they?A giant crab sculpture on Rash Field as the winner of a national competition to improve Baltimore's famous Inner Harbor?Have the judges lost their minds? Overdosed on Old Bay seasoning?Well, no, actually.There's a method to the city's madness. As the architect Robert Venturi once said about Main Street, the Crab is almost all right. Almost exactly right.The Crab, also known as "Blue Crab Park," is one of half a dozen "big ideas" proposed by a team of architects and landscape architects that just won the competition to redesign Rash Field and the west shore of the Inner Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
"Are you here to sell me something? Or do you wanna drink?" Thus did a dodgy looking 20-something greet us upon our entering Dick's Last Resort at the Inner Harbor's Power Plant complex. My first thought was: "Does this guy really think I look like a Bev Nap salesman?" 12:50 We stand momentarily stunned in Dick's lobby. It looks like a Gap t-shirt display, only more crass. That, by the way, is a compliment to both places. The rest of the joint looks like its interior decorator blew his entire $138 budget at a surf-shop fire sale.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Many Republicans and some editorialists seem to agree that President Clinton's plan to create a deficit reduction trust fund is a political gimmick. Imagine that.The fact is, of course, that it is not only a gimmick but just the latest in a series of gimmicks that have been enacted or proposed by both parties to prevent the politicians from doing what comes naturally, which is spending money on their constituents rather than something as ungrateful as the federal debt. That goal inspired the Gramm-Rudman law a few years ago, and it lies behind demands for a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 2, 2000
"Use words," a concerned librarian repeatedly advises Alexis, the young protagonist in Dael Orlandersmith's multi-character one-woman show, "The Gimmick." "Don't waste them." Alexis doesn't -- and neither does Orlandersmith. In interviews, the playwright/performer has emphasized that "The Gimmick" is not autobiographical. Yet there are unmistakable biographical similarities: Like Alexis, Orlandersmith was raised in Harlem and grew up to be a writer. This forceful, affecting and ultimately affirmative show -- currently on view in Center Stage's Head Theater -- proves how powerfully she learned to "use words."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 28, 1993
Few movies have ignited the public imagination like Neil Jordan's "The Crying Game." Even today, a full three months after its release and more than a week after the Academy of Motion Pictures effectively outed its co-star with a nomination for a role in a gender different from the one in which he begins the movie, a movie critic gets calls."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000
In the final slot of the current season, Center Stage is offering two separate one-woman shows. Although different in many ways, both shows tell stories of young people growing up. Dael Orlandersmith's "The Gimmick," which opens Friday, is a fictional account of two young friends in Harlem who dream of a life in the arts. "What interests me is the darker side of human nature -- because it gets us to the light," Orlandersmith is quoted as saying in the just-released anthology, "Extreme Exposures."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 27, 2000
Harlem dreamers When solo performance artist Dael Orlandersmith was last at Center Stage, during the 1998 Off Center Festival, she included parts of a work-in-progress among the excerpts she performed. Now her show has come together under the title "The Gimmick," and it opens Friday as part of Center Stage's main season. Directed by Chris Coleman, "The Gimmick" tells the fictitious story of two Harlem teen-agers determined to build a life in the arts. Orlandersmith's play is one of two one-woman shows that Center Stage is offering in the Head Theater in the final slot of the season.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | October 22, 2008
This wine from Tamayo Family Vineyards is a special label for this football-crazy market and thus something of a gimmick. If only all gimmicks tasted so good. It's a full-bodied dry red wine that is so jampacked with fruit it gives the impression of sweetness without the syrup. A blend of zinfandel, syrah and cabernet sauvignon, it offers layers of black-cherry, blackberry, chocolate and herb flavors. Imagine a fine port without the residual sugar. At four years, it's mature and mellow and perfect to serve with barbecue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
It takes a certain kind of bar to be successful in the Inner Harbor, and, sadly, Dick's Last Resort is it. The new waterside restaurant and bar next to Hard Rock Cafe is, in a word, colorful. That's a diplomatic way to put it. Dick's gets off on insulting its customers, with sarcastic servers and gimmicky put-downs. Underneath all the gimmicks, Dick's is just what you'd expect: a tourist zone with overpriced drinks and funky decor. Dick's Last Resort, which opened late last month, isn't the first Baltimore restaurant/bar with a cheap phallic pun in its name.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
Troy Smith refuses, at least publicly, to look at it this way. But the reality of his situation is, the more he plays this season for the Ravens, the more likely it is that his quarterbacking skills will be typecast, in the future, as a gimmick. Joe Flacco is the starter in Baltimore, and barring an injury, he'll almost certainly remain the starter - the man the franchise molds its offense around for years to come. But Smith, a Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback at Ohio State who has served as Flacco's backup for two seasons, still yearns to compete, to get into the game and help his team win. He isn't interested in becoming the next Kordell Stewart or Tim Tebow, a signal-caller known more for his athletic ability than for his prowess at reading coverages and making plays with his arm, even if that's how he's already viewed in some circles.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | October 22, 2008
This wine from Tamayo Family Vineyards is a special label for this football-crazy market and thus something of a gimmick. If only all gimmicks tasted so good. It's a full-bodied dry red wine that is so jampacked with fruit it gives the impression of sweetness without the syrup. A blend of zinfandel, syrah and cabernet sauvignon, it offers layers of black-cherry, blackberry, chocolate and herb flavors. Imagine a fine port without the residual sugar. At four years, it's mature and mellow and perfect to serve with barbecue.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 29, 2008
For years, 3-D movies have been the Rodney Dangerfields of cinema: amusing, intriguing but certainly not to be taken seriously. They were OK for 1950s-film revivals, or as amusement-park attractions, or for big-screen IMAX presentations where audiences could oooh and ahhh over whales presented life-size and the water from their blowholes practically spraying you in the face. But now the cheap thrills of 3-D are evolving into something smarter and maybe even a little more subtle. Increasingly movies - including two out next month - are banking on a level of 3-D depth that promises to go beyond gimmicky and become a new way of storytelling.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | March 17, 2008
Once a year, on the day of Baltimore's St. Patrick's Day parade, Ann Mooney doesn't want to be known as Ann Mooney. She is Ann Donohoe Mooney - adding her maiden name as a declaration of her Irish heritage on her father's side. Her loyalty to yesterday's parade was declaration enough. Every year, Mooney comes to the same spot on Charles Street between Centre and Hamilton streets with her friend, Kitt Rogers, and enough children to fill a classroom. Mooney remembers when it was just her and her husband (and their puppy, Guinness)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 15, 2008
Forty years ago, George Romero and a bunch of his buds threw together Night of the Living Dead, a piece of happily primitive filmmaking that scared the pants off the midnight horror crowd and inspired a whole generation of zombie films doubling as cultural commentary. With Diary of the Dead, Romero goes back to the beginning, only this time the amateurish look is calculated and the resulting film far less effective - if only because a handful of filmmakers have beaten him to the punch.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 30, 1993
To a significant degree, A.R. Gurney's "Love Letters" is a gimmick play. And the Maryland Arts Festival at Towson State University has added an extra gimmick.The script's gimmick is that, according to the playwright's own instructions, productions consist of two actors seated side by side at a table, reading aloud -- oblivious to each other's presence.What they read, as the title indicates, are letters -- a lifetime's worth, beginning when their characters are in second grade and ending when they are senior citizens.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 14, 1994
Despite its title, "Listen for the Miracle" doesn't strive for anything miraculous or particularly unusual, theatrically speaking. Instead, actress/playwright Mary Cinnamon has attempted to write a simple, heartwarming comedy about middle-aged romance and marriage.But even simple, heartwarming comedies require finesse and pacing -- by the performers as well as the writer. And those qualities aren't simple to achieve, as is indicated by this well-intentioned but disappointing Baltimore Playwrights Festival entry at the Spotlighters.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 1, 2008
Presenting more sports media notes while looking ahead to perhaps our greatest national holiday, embraced by those of all faiths and no religion, by those with every shade of skin, by those whose American roots go back 400 years or last year and by those from one end of the political spectrum to the other, Super Bowl Sunday: Just added to the Super Bowl festivities: The coin for the flip will be carried out to midfield by ESPN's Dana Jacobson, who will...
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