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NEWS
December 15, 2008
On December 13, 2008, MARY CHARLOTTE GIMBEL (nee Hook), beloved wife of the late Frederick C. Gimbel, loving mother of Gretchen Durham and Fred Gimbel, dear sister of Robert C. Hook, cherished grandmother of Brian Durham, Tim and Mark Gimbel and Todd Durham. Also survived by five great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Rd (at York Rd) Timonium, MD 21093 on Sunday, 7 to 9 P.M. A celebration of Charlotte's life will be held in the funeral home on Monday, December 15 at 10:30 A.M. with the Entombment Service proceeding at 9:15 A.M. in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Pikesville.
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NEWS
February 4, 2010
It is downright disturbing to see that Mike Gimbel, someone who has worked in substance abuse programs, could express such a shockingly callous and ignorant view of medical marijuana dispensaries and drug treatment centers by implying that they would have a negative effect on "our communities, especially our children." ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). As Mr. Gimbel himself should know, such establishments exist in order to provide reprieve and care for afflicted members of our community.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
In the second sudden personnel decision of Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s administration, the county's drug czar - often regarded as a pioneer in the field - has been fired. Michael M. Gimbel, director of the county's Bureau of Substance Abuse for nearly 23 years, said late Wednesday that the director of the Health Department, Dr. Michelle A. Leverett, told him there was "no place for me in the new administration." "This was a departmental decision," Smith's spokeswoman, Elise Armacost, said yesterday.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
On December 13, 2008, MARY CHARLOTTE GIMBEL (nee Hook), beloved wife of the late Frederick C. Gimbel, loving mother of Gretchen Durham and Fred Gimbel, dear sister of Robert C. Hook, cherished grandmother of Brian Durham, Tim and Mark Gimbel and Todd Durham. Also survived by five great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Rd (at York Rd) Timonium, MD 21093 on Sunday, 7 to 9 P.M. A celebration of Charlotte's life will be held in the funeral home on Monday, December 15 at 10:30 A.M. with the Entombment Service proceeding at 9:15 A.M. in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Pikesville.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
John H. Gimbel Jr., a retired chief financial officer of a commercial construction firm, died Sunday of a heart attack while driving to church along the Baltimore Beltway. He was 82 and lived for more than 45 years in Lutherville before a recent move to Oak Crest Village in Parkville. Before he retired 20 years ago, Mr. Gimbel was vice president of finance for John H. Hampshire Inc., a Remington plastering and drywall firm, where he had been a 35-year employee. Born in Baltimore and raised on Wilkens Avenue, he was a 1936 graduate of City College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 3, 2008
Dr. Harry S. Gimbel, an old-fashioned general practitioner who made house calls long after others had stopped, died Sunday in his sleep at his Pikesville home. He was 96. Dr Gimbel practiced for about 50 years, and patients who came to his Catonsville office were seen without appointments. His two sons are orthopedic surgeons who live in Phoenix, Ariz. Dr. Gimbel worked seven days a week and would leave work late in the afternoon, rest for half an hour, eat dinner at 5 p.m., and then return to his office, where he saw patients until 9 p.m. "He did this three or four nights a week," recalled one of his sons, Dr. Neal I. Gimbel.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | March 25, 1991
Teen-agers in Baltimore County are being warned by police and Students Against Drunk Driving about a powerful drug that is a mixture of the volatile hallucinogens LSD and PCP.Police have also asked teen-agers to help them track down the distributor of the lethal mixture.Five students in the county were hospitalized in February and another two in March, according to Michael Gimbel, coordinator of the county Office of Substance Abuse. Two of the students remain hospitalized at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
Since Michael M. Gimbel was fired last week from his job as Baltimore County's drug czar, scores of people have been calling, writing and circulating petitions in hopes that County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will reinstate Gimbel as head of the county's Bureau of Substance Abuse. Despite the outpouring of support from community activists and at least one elected official - Del. Emmett C. Burns Jr., a Baltimore County Democrat - it appears unlikely that Smith will intervene on Gimbel's behalf.
NEWS
August 22, 2003
On Wednesday, August 20, 2003, SIDNEY GUMENICK. Loving brother of Eugene Gumenick, Michael Gumenick and Jacki Gimbel, devoted brother-in-law of Christine Bass and David Gimbel. Beloved uncle of Brian Gumenick, Matthew Gumenick, Jeffrey and Kelly Lasov, Daniel Gumenick and Jessica Gumenick. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, August 22 11A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, Timonium, MD. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be directed to The Epilepsy Association of Maryland, 5438 York Rd. (21212)
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
An innovative Baltimore County computer data base that maps the county's worst drug neighborhoods has caught the attention of IBM officials.Begun with $150,000 in state and local grant money, the program, called Substance Abuse Tracking System, or SATS, combines the efforts of the county police department and the county Office of Substance Abuse. IBM officials recently visited the county to see how the system works."They are interested in maybe making this into a nationwide system," said Mike Gimbel, head of the county's substance abuse office.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
Facial puffiness. Higher blood pressure and heart rate. Drastic personality changes. Those are some of the signs Maryland physicians are being encouraged to look for as they treat young athletes - signs that could be red flags for steroid use, according to a campaign launched yesterday. "The message about anabolic steroids, about energy drinks, supplements, is something that people want to know about," said Michael Gimbel, director of Powered by Me!, a St. Joseph Medical Center program for training and educating people on steroids and other performance enhancers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 3, 2008
Dr. Harry S. Gimbel, an old-fashioned general practitioner who made house calls long after others had stopped, died Sunday in his sleep at his Pikesville home. He was 96. Dr Gimbel practiced for about 50 years, and patients who came to his Catonsville office were seen without appointments. His two sons are orthopedic surgeons who live in Phoenix, Ariz. Dr. Gimbel worked seven days a week and would leave work late in the afternoon, rest for half an hour, eat dinner at 5 p.m., and then return to his office, where he saw patients until 9 p.m. "He did this three or four nights a week," recalled one of his sons, Dr. Neal I. Gimbel.
NEWS
April 1, 2005
Keeping addicts alive is big step toward recovery I applaud Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner, and Dr. Robert Schwartz of the Open Society Institute for their efforts at saving lives and obtaining funding and treatment on behalf of the many addicts in Baltimore ("City overdose deaths fell by 12% last year," March 28). As a substance abuse treatment provider and recovering addict-alcoholic, I know the bureaucratic hoops that one must jump through to get motivated addicts into treatment.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
Michael M. Gimbel had no problem navigating the widely spaced orange cones while driving the small utility cart. But once he put on the "fatal vision glasses," the cart's small but erratically moving wheels crunched the cones and knocked them around. "There was a big difference in perception," Gimbel said. "My ability was way off." The purpose of the demonstration at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson yesterday was to remind the public of the dangers of drinking and driving. The "fatal vision glasses" are designed to distort peripheral vision, reduce depth perception and blur vision to simulate the effects of having a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent, said Gimbel, director of Sheppard Pratt's Office of Substance Abuse Education.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2004
On this cable show, sex, drugs and violence aren't glamorous. They're deadly -- or at least damaging -- says Mike Gimbel, director of Sheppard Pratt Health System's Substance Abuse Education and Prevention Services and the force behind Teen Talk, a program on Harford Cable Network that features high school students talking about their most distressing problems, from drugs to bullying. "Teens today are put in adult situations," said Gimbel, former head of Baltimore County's Bureau of Substance Abuse.
NEWS
August 22, 2003
On Wednesday, August 20, 2003, SIDNEY GUMENICK. Loving brother of Eugene Gumenick, Michael Gumenick and Jacki Gimbel, devoted brother-in-law of Christine Bass and David Gimbel. Beloved uncle of Brian Gumenick, Matthew Gumenick, Jeffrey and Kelly Lasov, Daniel Gumenick and Jessica Gumenick. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, August 22 11A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, Timonium, MD. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be directed to The Epilepsy Association of Maryland, 5438 York Rd. (21212)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 12, 2003
AS MIKE Gimbel drives through the streets of Baltimore County, he says he sees pretty good signs up ahead. He's working on a new drug program for private schools. He's talking to the Archdiocese of Baltimore about some ideas. He's still getting love letters and phone calls from people who can't believe the thing that happened to him. He says he's doing fine. Baltimore County should be doing so well. Barely a month after Gimbel's firing as director of the county's Bureau of Substance Abuse, a job he created and then held for 23 years, the traffic ahead of him is pretty clear.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 12, 2003
AS MIKE Gimbel drives through the streets of Baltimore County, he says he sees pretty good signs up ahead. He's working on a new drug program for private schools. He's talking to the Archdiocese of Baltimore about some ideas. He's still getting love letters and phone calls from people who can't believe the thing that happened to him. He says he's doing fine. Baltimore County should be doing so well. Barely a month after Gimbel's firing as director of the county's Bureau of Substance Abuse, a job he created and then held for 23 years, the traffic ahead of him is pretty clear.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
In her first public comments since firing the director of Baltimore County's Bureau of Substance Abuse, Dr. Michelle A. Leverett outlined plans yesterday to focus the bureau's efforts on treatment and prevention programs for youngsters who are most at risk for drug use. Leverett, the county health officer, did not specifically mention former Director Michael M. Gimbel, but she implied that his high-profile tenure did little to reduce the problem of...
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