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June 10, 2011
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
William Goldsborough Helfrich III, who helped with the operation and management of a handful of downtown restaurants, died June 21 in La Jolla, Calif., after suffering multiple organ failure. He was 38. Born in Arlington Heights, Ill., Mr. Helfrich - known as Will to friends and family - lived in Kansas City before moving to Baltimore with his family in 1983 and settling in Roland Park. He attended Gilman School from second grade until graduating with the Class of 1994. While at Gilman, he earned two varsity letters in football, playing tight end, and two more as the baseball team's third baseman.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
After a seven-month search, the Gilman School has named a new headmaster. Henry P.A. Smyth, the school's assistant headmaster for the last two years, was unanimously selected to take over the position by the school's Board of Trustees after being recommended by a committee of alumni, trustees, parents and faculty members, the school said. The committee had worked with a consulting firm and conducted a national search to replace John E. Schmick, who announced in March his plan to leave the school at the end of this school year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Henry B. "Burke" Mathews Jr., a co-founder of a Hampden custom cabinet business, died Thursday of renal failure at his Ruxton home. He was 88. The son of Henry Burke Mathews, a vice president of Commercial Credit Corp., and Katherine Grove Mathews, a homemaker, Henry Burke Mathews Jr. was born in New Orleans. He moved with his family in 1928 to a home on Belvedere Avenue, and they later settled on Churchwardens Road in Homeland. A 1944 graduate of Gilman School, Mr. Mathews, who never used his first name, had started his education at Princeton University when he was drafted into the Army.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
Katharine Jackson Reese, a former Gilman School trustee who was active in Harford County educational and cultural causes, died of cancer March 25 at her Havre de Grace home. She was 87. Born in New Haven, Conn., and the daughter of John Day Jackson, former editor and publisher of the New Haven Register, she earned a degree at Sarah Lawrence College and studied piano in France in the 1930s. She and her husband of nearly 50 years, William B. Reese, a Coca-Cola executive and farmer, moved to Seven Springs Farm in northern Harford County in 1950.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2006
James C. Pine, who was believed to be Gilman School's oldest living graduate and who taught there for more than 40 years, died Thursday at the Heron Point retirement community in Chestertown. He was 101. Mr. Pine's philosophy of hard work and discipline helped shape Gilman's reputation, according to fellow teachers. He was head of the history department and director of the public speaking program for much of his tenure there. "I learned as much from him about the art and craft of teaching as any other person," said Redmond Finney, who began as a young teacher under Mr. Pine's tutelage and went on to serve as the school's headmaster from 1968 to 1992.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1999
Reginald Sidney Tickner, whose career as an educator at Gilman School spanned 41 years, died in his sleep Thursday at his Cedarcroft residence. He was 76.Mr. Tickner began his career in 1951 as teacher of English, geography and expository writing, and became an administrator and coach at the private school in North Baltimore.From 1951 to 1960, he taught English and was a football and wrestling coach in the Upper School. He was head of the Lower School from 1961 to 1970, and head of the Middle School from 1971 to 1980.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Forty-two students at the Gilman School have been implicated in a drug scandal after a marijuana bust Friday that has shaken the Baltimore institution catering to the children of the city's elite since the last century.The school's headmaster, Archibald R. Montgomery, said yesterday that some of the students came forward on their own and others were discovered during an internal investigation that led them to a student's locker and a small film canister filled with marijuana."It is an unhappy time at the Gilman School," Mr. Montgomery said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
They came from Paris, Hong Kong and all neighborhoods of metropolitan Baltimore to celebrate 100 years of learning at Gilman School.Yesterday, as bagpipers solemnly led a parade of Gilman alumni to the stately private boys' school's Roland Park campus, hundreds of graduates tipped their hats to the institution in a spirited birthday tribute marked by rowdy cheers, sweet memories and emotional reunions.Centered under a white tent nearly the size of two football fields, the school's centennial weekend called about 2,000 Gilmanites back to the Colonial red-brick campus to pay tribute to past educational successes and toast future endeavors.
NEWS
By Michael James and Eric Siegel and Michael James and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
The headmaster of one of Baltimore's most prestigious boys schools said yesterday that he will resign next year, capping a tenure that has at times put him in the spotlight of controversy. Archibald R. Montgomery IV made the announcement less than a month after perhaps the most turbulent incident he faced in eight years as headmaster of Gilman School. Montgomery, 47, who will leave July 1, 2001, had decided last month to temporarily bar the noted Lancers Boys Club from campus in the wake of a student's allegation against its founder, Robert I. H. Hammerman, a retired Baltimore Circuit Court judge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Patricia S. "Patty" Farber, a former private school art teacher and volunteer who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro when she was in her 60s, died May 10 of lung cancer at her home in Brewster, Mass. The longtime Towson resident was 87. "We got to know the Farbers through the Gilman School connection because our kids were there, and we did a lot of things together," said Richard W. Sunderland, a longtime close friend of Mrs. Farber and her husband. "Patty was a wonderful person and so full of life.
NEWS
By Nelson Coffin | May 14, 2014
These are exhilarating, and, truthfully, scary times for fans of the Boys' Latin School varsity lacrosse team with just one game remaining -  May 16, against archrival St. Paul's School in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference final.  Up to now, the Lakers' season has been pretty much perfect. They're the No. 1 team in the metropolitan area, according to The Baltimore Sun, and are also No. 1 nationally in the most recent Under Armour/Inside Lacrosse rankings.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 8, 2014
Katrina Marinelli swung for the fences and got all ball. "Nice hit," said a teammate. It wasn't really a hit. The 12-year-old Roland Park girl was hitting a softball off a tee into a net during practice, as the Rams, a newly formed girls softball team at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, prepared for an April 8 away game against Dumbarton Middle School in Rodgers Forge. Coaches and parents who organized the team say it's the first girls softball team at the school in many years, if not ever, and a rarity in the budget-conscious Baltimore Public School System, where middle school softball is considered a luxury.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Looking to create more interaction between baseball players from Baltimore City public and private schools, organizers of the President's Cup have changed the event's format, eschewing a 16-team public vs. private tournament in favor of a single East vs. West all-star game. Now in its fourth year, the event -- to take place Saturday at 1 p.m. at Camden Yards -- will feature two 25-man teams comprised of players from a mixture of 18 public and private schools. Lester Davis, the director of communications and media relations for City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young, said the new format better lends itself to building relationships between players from diverse social and economic backgrounds.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
A 16-year-old was arrested with a handgun on a Maryland Transit Administration bus in North Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, an incident that prompted several area schools to go on lockdown.  Principals of the Roland Country School, the Gilman School, and the Brwyn Mawr School sent e-mails to parents Tuesday saying they locked down the schools after police notified them that an armed person had been reported around Northern Parkway near Roland Avenue. ...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Mary Spencer-Smith, a former sales associate who later worked with autistic children, died Jan. 24 of undetermined causes at her Hampstead home. She was 56. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy as to the cause of death," said her husband of 22 years, Charles L. "Chuck" Smith Jr., a field engineer. The daughter of Willis Spencer, a Gilman School teacher, and Susanne Spencer, a homemaker, Mary Willis Spencer was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating from St. Timothy's School in Stevenson, Ms. Spencer-Smith attended St. Mary's College for several years, before earning a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Alabama, where she had majored in English literature with a minor in creative writing.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2007
The headmaster of Gilman School has abruptly stepped down after it was discovered that he falsely claimed membership on a university hockey team on his resume and in discussions with school officials before his hiring. Jon C. McGill, who has served as headmaster since 2001, resigned from the private all-boys school in Baltimore last week after an annual evaluation revealed the false claim, according to separate statements released Friday by McGill and the school's board of trustees. "It came to light that there were misrepresentations on his resume and in his early discussions with Gilman having to do with his intercollegiate athletic participation," Charles C. Fenwick Jr., president of the board, wrote in a statement that was posted on the school's Web site.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | September 6, 1993
Algebra and geometry. Soccer and football. Parties. These are the rites of autumn as schools reopen.Who would have thought "civility" would ever top the list?That's the case at Gilman School, the 96-year-old private school on the corner of Roland Avenue and Northern Parkway, which has made civility -- aka courtesy -- its theme for the academic year.Students begin classes tomorrow at a school whose headmaster is determined that Gilman will be a kinder, gentler place. Alarmed by the rampant lack of courteous behavior nationwide, Headmaster Arch Montgomery has declared war on incivility.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Richard C. Rice, owner of a Baltimore kitchen and bathroom design firm, died Oct. 14 of cancer at his Ruxton home. He was 51. Richard Carew Rice was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was the son of John Hubner Rice Jr., who had been vice president of Barton-Cotton Inc., a Baltimore graphics and printing company, and Carew Cotton Rice Lee, a homemaker. After graduating in 1980 from Gilman School, where he played varsity soccer and lacrosse, he earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1984 from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
John H. "Beau" Williams Jr., who had headed a Baltimore contracting and building firm, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park, John Harlan Williams Jr. was the son of John Harlan Williams Sr., who founded J. H. Williams & Co. in 1941, and Lela Ingram Williams, a homemaker. Mr. Williams, who was known as "Beau," attended Gilman School and graduated in 1944 from the Pomfret School in Pomfret, Conn.
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