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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
Nine large white vessels hover like clouds above the atrium of a recently restored landmark on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The vessels are shaped like vases or Greek amphorae, but they aren't made of clay or porcelain. Instead, they were fabricated with powder-coated steel frames covered by South African shade cloth. The vessels created by Virginia sculptor Kendall Buster help call attention to Baltimore's newest cultural attraction, the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | October 22, 2012
After making up Friday's postponed football game Monday afternoon, Calvert Hall and Gilman both face quick turnarounds to prepare for important games this weekend, something neither coach is thrilled about. Friday night, No. 2 Calvert Hall will play at No. 10 Archbishop Spalding in a showdown for second-place in the MIAA A Conference. Saturday at 1 p.m., the No. 1 Greyhounds, who clinched the top spot for the A Conference playoffs with Monday's 24-14 win over the Cardinals, will host their 97 th annual rivalry game against McDonogh.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
After generations tucked into a small room on the first floor of Gilman Hall, The Johns Hopkins University's archaeological collection has emerged from seclusion. Ancient sculptures, pottery, jewelry, weapons and tools from the Americas to the Middle East will now get their moment in a mix of sun and cool museum light that illuminates an expanded new display space after an $85 million renovation. The collection marked its opening day Sunday with lectures, lunch and a cocktail reception, and with a new, more dignified name: The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
North Charles Street motorists, bikers and walkers will notice that the scaffolding that has masked the elegant south portico of historic Homewood Museum since late last fall has been removed, revealing a dazzling and historically accurate restoration. And on a sun-splashed September afternoon on the Johns Hopkins University campus, Catherine Rogers Arthur, Homewood's director and curator, couldn't wait to show off the nearly completed work to a visitor. "We were able to save as much of the True Cross as possible," she said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | May 6, 2007
As the first major building completed when the Johns Hopkins University moved in the early 1900s from downtown to its current North Baltimore location, Gilman Hall was both the literal and figurative heart of campus. Distinguished by a massive bell tower and portico, visible from many directions, it was the place where students and faculty spent most of their time. But after 92 years and numerous campus additions, that heart has grown weak. This summer, Hopkins will embark on a three-year, $73 million restoration and modernization that promises to breathe new life into this academic landmark and reinforce its role as a cultural crossroads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver and Jarrett Graver,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 16, 1998
Don't expect any paparazzi to lurk outside the Baltimore DTC Museum of Art, but when the first Johns Hopkins Film Festival opens today at 7 p.m. with a screening of Paddy Breathnach's gritty Irish crime fable "I Went Down," more than a few "indie" (independent) film buffs will be on hand to herald the return of the film festival to Baltimore.Each winter, Hollywood relocates to a small, snow-covered town in Utah to fete a wealth of quirky independent films with chilled beluga and distribution deals, but ever since poor ticket sales and spoiled sentiment combined to deep six Charm City's own folksy version of Sundance - the Baltimore International Film Festival - area fans of indie films have been left out in the cold.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
The Johns Hopkins University is moving forward with a new bookstore and commercial project across from its Homewood campus that will reshape the streetscape of Charles Village and, officials hope, foster a "college-town atmosphere" in the North Baltimore neighborhood. The mixed-use project along 33rd Street between North Charles and St. Paul, to be completed by July 2005, will include student housing, parking, retail, office and restaurant space near the bookstore, taking up much of the block.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | April 13, 2000
One of the most provocative entries at last year's MicroCineFest was "How to Start a Revolution in America," a little piece of realpolitik cinema-verite that makes "The Blair Witch Project" look about as authentic as "Bambi." Made by New Jersey-based filmmaker Mike Z., "Revolution" is a how-to tape made by a cell of underground radicals whose plans to overthrow the social order by violence only look funny when you realize they're all based on cornstarch. Still, as hilarious as the film is, it also manages to make viewers more than a tad squeamish, a line between fiction and reality that Z. has exploited in all his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | April 9, 2000
The 2000 Johns Hopkins Film Festival has scored two major programming coups, offering the only opportunity so far to see these great films in Baltimore this year. "The Target Shoots First" won the audience award for best documentary at Park City, Utah's Slamdance festival in January, and wowed filmgoers at South by Southwest in Austin. Chris Wilcha's autobio-pic about his first post-college job as a marketing executive at Columbia House (the mail-order record company) starts out looking like just another snarky, condescending inside glimpse of corporate politics.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2004
It's nearing midnight. Johns Hopkins University junior Abby Burch and several other students are setting up a row of chairs in front of the all-night reading room at Gilman Hall. An Enya CD is warbling in the background when Burch barks out a command. "OK you guys, now when people walk by, offer them back rubs," she cries. "Not in a creepy way." Back rubs? It's midterm time at the Homewood campus, and students are in a zombie-like state -- their eyes glazed and unfocused while the gray matter processes Italian politics, linear algebra and the collected tragedies of Aeschylus.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | September 5, 2012
Looking for some great high school football this week? Beginning Thursday night at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, you can find terrific matchups at the 9/11 Patriot Classic, which includes top teams from Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Three of our state's best teams, The Baltimore Sun's No. 1 Gilman and No. 2 Calvert Hall, as well as Good Counsel, highlight a three-day slate that includes No. 6 McDonogh, Archbishop Spalding and St. Mary's, as well as three of the top teams in New Jersey and the fifth-ranked team in Pennsylvania, according to the USA Today high school football rankings.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
To reach the state semifinals a year ago, Wilde Lake's football team had to beat two of its toughest Howard County rivals, Atholton and River Hill, a second time. The Wildecats prevailed and went on to win the state Class 3A title, but coach Mike Harrison said it's never easy to face local rival in the playoffs. "Having done this for a couple of years, it's a very unenviable position as a coach," Harrison said, "because if you're on the back end of it and something goes wrong early in the [playoff]
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
After generations tucked into a small room on the first floor of Gilman Hall, The Johns Hopkins University's archaeological collection has emerged from seclusion. Ancient sculptures, pottery, jewelry, weapons and tools from the Americas to the Middle East will now get their moment in a mix of sun and cool museum light that illuminates an expanded new display space after an $85 million renovation. The collection marked its opening day Sunday with lectures, lunch and a cocktail reception, and with a new, more dignified name: The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
Nine large white vessels hover like clouds above the atrium of a recently restored landmark on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The vessels are shaped like vases or Greek amphorae, but they aren't made of clay or porcelain. Instead, they were fabricated with powder-coated steel frames covered by South African shade cloth. The vessels created by Virginia sculptor Kendall Buster help call attention to Baltimore's newest cultural attraction, the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | May 6, 2007
As the first major building completed when the Johns Hopkins University moved in the early 1900s from downtown to its current North Baltimore location, Gilman Hall was both the literal and figurative heart of campus. Distinguished by a massive bell tower and portico, visible from many directions, it was the place where students and faculty spent most of their time. But after 92 years and numerous campus additions, that heart has grown weak. This summer, Hopkins will embark on a three-year, $73 million restoration and modernization that promises to breathe new life into this academic landmark and reinforce its role as a cultural crossroads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
How quiet, up here in the bell-tower room in Gilman Hall. Far below, maybe a few sunbathers on the grassy Beach, or bowl, of Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus. Across Charles Street, high in Wolman Hall (once the Cambridge Arms), see those four apartment windows? There, in 1935-1936, F. Scott Fitzgerald lived and wrote. Gilman's tower-room view of downtown is good too, but those who peer out raptly, in other seasons, or who slump around the big table, in three-hour critiques, are writers themselves -- grad students in the university's Writing Seminars.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | July 18, 1991
You know Johns Hopkins University: a fine, Ivy-wannabe institution, verifiably academic, intellectual beyond belief.And also quite a hoot."I think that's why it's so funny -- it's so serious," says Jeff Altman, 39, surely one of the few nationally known comedians with a Hopkins diploma. "It's not the kind of place that breeds comics."Despite that, his years at Hopkins don't appear to have scarred Mr. Altman, who is appearing in two shows at Slapstix comedy club in the Brokerage tonight. Since graduating, he's become a familiar face on the comedy-club, cable-special, talk-show circuit, appeared on numerous TV shows and movies, and will star this fall in a new NBC series, "Nurses."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2004
It's nearing midnight. Johns Hopkins University junior Abby Burch and several other students are setting up a row of chairs in front of the all-night reading room at Gilman Hall. An Enya CD is warbling in the background when Burch barks out a command. "OK you guys, now when people walk by, offer them back rubs," she cries. "Not in a creepy way." Back rubs? It's midterm time at the Homewood campus, and students are in a zombie-like state -- their eyes glazed and unfocused while the gray matter processes Italian politics, linear algebra and the collected tragedies of Aeschylus.
NEWS
By KERRY MICHAEL HILLIS | April 23, 2003
TEN YEARS ago, famed journalist and native Baltimorean Russell Baker was incensed by a college magazine's rating of the Johns Hopkins University as one of the most boring universities in the country. Revealing his displeasure in an article for The New York Times, Mr. Baker was not upset that Hopkins was on the list but instead that the magazine dared claim any other school could possibly be more "funless" than his beloved alma mater. Always eager to demonstrate his comic wit, Mr. Baker saw the lack of just about anything to do around the Homewood campus as a matter of personal pride (Mr. Baker insisted that Blue Jays lack any actual school pride)
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