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Gillian Anderson

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By NEWSDAY | February 9, 2006
If you've been wondering what happened to Gillian Anderson, the actress who played Agent Scully in The X-Files, she hasn't been abducted by aliens. The 37-year-old actress, who lived in England as a child, moved to London three years ago, where she's been pursuing a career on the West End stage and in low-budget, independent films. Anderson was in New York to publicize Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film in which she has a very small, but very funny, part. She is also in Bleak House on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | December 2, 2008
Starring David Duchovny, Gillian Anderson. Directed by Chris Carter. Fox Home Video. $29.95, blu-ray $39.95 *** The X-Files may have ended its television run in 2002, but interest in agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully and all that stuff the FBI isn't telling us continues. Which is why, six years after the weekly series left the air, The X-Files: I Want to Believe hit the big screen in July. Fans will be glad to run across Mulder and Scully once again: She's a dedicated surgeon trying to eradicate the world's ills over which she has some control, while he's become pretty much a basket case, burnt-out, disillusioned and basically not giving a darn anymore.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 2, 2001
Poor Lily Bart - so sure she could get by on beauty, luck and pluck alone. Her rude awakening and ignominious fate is the stuff of classic drama. It's also the stuff of a cinematic genre - the resourceful 19th-century woman whom society seems determined to suppress that's threatening to become a cinematic cliche. What prevents "The House of Mirth" from being just another proto-feminist parable is not only tremendous source material (it's hard to resist the bite of good Edith Wharton), but a strong, resourceful cast, spearheaded by Gillian Anderson's multi-layered, self-assured turn in the lead role.
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By Alex Plimack and Alex Plimack,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
In the six years since The X-Files last graced the small screen, those involved went their separate ways, exploring other opportunities much different from the science-fiction show that ran for nine years on Fox. Creator Chris Carter made a movie, Fencewalker, on his own that may not see release. David Duchovny, who played believer Fox Mulder, went on to star in the Showtime series Californication. Gillian Anderson (skeptic Dana Scully) moved to Britain, where she starred in two plays in London.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 26, 1998
This may be Gillian Anderson's big movie moment, but don't think she's nervous. The actress is maintaining an almost Scullyan unflappability even as "The X-Files" looks to be as big of a hit as the TV show that spawned it."I'm really kind of casual about it all," Anderson said when she phoned the film desk this week. "I'm excited that the numbers are staying high for the week, and I'm curious about how next weekend will do. I have to say I'm finally relaxed."Finally? "There was just a lot of press centered around the opening of the film and other commitments," she said.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | December 2, 2008
Starring David Duchovny, Gillian Anderson. Directed by Chris Carter. Fox Home Video. $29.95, blu-ray $39.95 *** The X-Files may have ended its television run in 2002, but interest in agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully and all that stuff the FBI isn't telling us continues. Which is why, six years after the weekly series left the air, The X-Files: I Want to Believe hit the big screen in July. Fans will be glad to run across Mulder and Scully once again: She's a dedicated surgeon trying to eradicate the world's ills over which she has some control, while he's become pretty much a basket case, burnt-out, disillusioned and basically not giving a darn anymore.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 22, 1999
"Playing by Heart" is "Beverly Hills 90210" for baby boomers, the kind of all-star roundup we usually associate with such camp classics as "The Poseidon Adventure" and "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World."But "Playing by Heart" is no disaster epic, nor is it a comedy. In fact, it may best be described as a mystery: Why on earth would such talents as Gena Rowlands, Sean Connery and Ellen Burstyn, not to mention a first-rate creative team behind the camera, stoop to something this trivial?This insipid Tinseltown melodrama, told in round-robin style, was originally titled "Dancing About Architecture," which should clue filmgoers into its arty pretensions.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
Something fishy is supposed to happen tonight on "Tonight," as the National Aquarium in Baltimore is scheduled to turn up in a series of spots on Jay Leno's late-night show. Maryland Public Television is also offering a screening of the 1965 classic "Dr. Zhivago."* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- A serial killer with a bizarre modus operandi -- network promotions reveal no details -- challenges Mulder and Scully (David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson) to find the common thread in the crimes.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 16, 1994
Tonight, at long last, Friday night arrives with a suitcase -- or at least with a grab bag -- full of worthwhile TV offerings.There's one new series premiere, an especially spooky season premiere, and a brand-new telemovie that ought to delight fans of MTV.* "The X-Files" (9-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- This is the spooky second-season premiere in question -- and it begins where last season's cliffhanger left off, with "Deep Throat" dead and the X-Files team separated.Mulder (David Duchovny) is doing a routine wiretap, Scully (Gillian Anderson)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 7, 1994
The "big event" tonight is that Zack and Kelly are getting married in a new prime-time telemovie version of "Saved By the Bell." That being the case, stick with smaller but undoubtedly more enriching events: a Bill Moyers discussion on PBS, or episodes of "The X-Files" and "Picket Fences" on Fox and CBS, respectively.* "Saved By the Bell -- Wedding in Las Vegas" (8-10 p.m., Channel 2) -- My kids watch this show so religiously in reruns that it's become my personal cathode-ray equivalent of kryptonite: The merest of exposure to this show makes me a little green around the edges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | February 9, 2006
If you've been wondering what happened to Gillian Anderson, the actress who played Agent Scully in The X-Files, she hasn't been abducted by aliens. The 37-year-old actress, who lived in England as a child, moved to London three years ago, where she's been pursuing a career on the West End stage and in low-budget, independent films. Anderson was in New York to publicize Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story, a film in which she has a very small, but very funny, part. She is also in Bleak House on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 2, 2001
Poor Lily Bart - so sure she could get by on beauty, luck and pluck alone. Her rude awakening and ignominious fate is the stuff of classic drama. It's also the stuff of a cinematic genre - the resourceful 19th-century woman whom society seems determined to suppress that's threatening to become a cinematic cliche. What prevents "The House of Mirth" from being just another proto-feminist parable is not only tremendous source material (it's hard to resist the bite of good Edith Wharton), but a strong, resourceful cast, spearheaded by Gillian Anderson's multi-layered, self-assured turn in the lead role.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 22, 1999
"Playing by Heart" is "Beverly Hills 90210" for baby boomers, the kind of all-star roundup we usually associate with such camp classics as "The Poseidon Adventure" and "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World."But "Playing by Heart" is no disaster epic, nor is it a comedy. In fact, it may best be described as a mystery: Why on earth would such talents as Gena Rowlands, Sean Connery and Ellen Burstyn, not to mention a first-rate creative team behind the camera, stoop to something this trivial?This insipid Tinseltown melodrama, told in round-robin style, was originally titled "Dancing About Architecture," which should clue filmgoers into its arty pretensions.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 26, 1998
This may be Gillian Anderson's big movie moment, but don't think she's nervous. The actress is maintaining an almost Scullyan unflappability even as "The X-Files" looks to be as big of a hit as the TV show that spawned it."I'm really kind of casual about it all," Anderson said when she phoned the film desk this week. "I'm excited that the numbers are staying high for the week, and I'm curious about how next weekend will do. I have to say I'm finally relaxed."Finally? "There was just a lot of press centered around the opening of the film and other commitments," she said.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 19, 1998
Unlike the paranormal events it chronicles every week, the hit television show "The X-Files" can be programmed, categorized and easily referenced.It appeals to the conspiracy buff in all of us, with the siren call of government cover-ups, shadowy well-dressed cabals and -- bonus! -- extraterrestrials of the Roswell, N.M., variety. It is science fiction at its most sophisticated -- no pie plates on strings, no time warps, just the stuff of the human imagination on its darkest, wildest day.Its stories teem with memorable and often recurring themes and characters, all of which will one day connect in the Grand Unified Theory that will link the Kennedy assassination, Area 51 and why you can't find a decent cup of coffee on I-95.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 16, 1998
NEW YORK -- Gillian Anderson, better known as Agent Dana Scully, has just stepped off the stage at the Jacob Javits Convention Center and is making her way through some 6,500 fans to the autograph table. Jessica Barrett, a 17-year-old fan from Stockholm, N.J., offers an instant analysis of Anderson's performance in the hourlong question-and-answer session with audience members that just ended."I love Scully, totally love Scully," Barrett says. "But, after seeing Gillian Anderson, I have to tell you I think she's an airhead, total airhead."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 9, 1994
Two days ago, Shannen Doherty was missing from "Beverly Hills, 90210," but tonight she makes a roaring comeback as a good girl gone bad, and on the lam, in "Jailbreakers," Showtime's newest neo-retro "Rebel Highway" made-for-tv movie. Otherwise, the night is dominated by the three Rs: reruns, reruns, reruns.* "M.A.N.T.I.S." (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 45) -- Perhaps it's time to start praying, "M.A.N.T.I.S." the first episode, which premiered two weeks ago, earned a 14 share of the available audience and was third in its time slot.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Guest stars continue to populate popular series, and money expert Louis Rukeyser turns his attention to America's education system.* "VR.5" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Actually, in this intriguing series' season finale, Sydney (Lori Singer) reaches VR.8, the deepest level of virtual reality she has plumbed to date, where she learns some family truths. But will she be able to come back out? Louise Fletcher makes a guest appearance as Sydney's mother. Fox.* "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
Something fishy is supposed to happen tonight on "Tonight," as the National Aquarium in Baltimore is scheduled to turn up in a series of spots on Jay Leno's late-night show. Maryland Public Television is also offering a screening of the 1965 classic "Dr. Zhivago."* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- A serial killer with a bizarre modus operandi -- network promotions reveal no details -- challenges Mulder and Scully (David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson) to find the common thread in the crimes.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Guest stars continue to populate popular series, and money expert Louis Rukeyser turns his attention to America's education system.* "VR.5" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Actually, in this intriguing series' season finale, Sydney (Lori Singer) reaches VR.8, the deepest level of virtual reality she has plumbed to date, where she learns some family truths. But will she be able to come back out? Louise Fletcher makes a guest appearance as Sydney's mother. Fox.* "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
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