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NEWS
December 1, 2005
Relationships between lawmakers and lobbyists are so vulnerable to corruption that the line is easily crossed. Lawmakers depend increasingly on well-heeled lobbyists for the campaign contributions they need to stay in office; lobbyists need lawmakers to shape laws and spending decisions to benefit their clients. It's a short leap, really, from wealthy corporate and other interests showering campaign cash on sympathetic legislators to the sort of out-and-out bribery practiced by disgraced Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham and the defense industry lobbyists who plied him with at least $2.4 million in personal gifts in return for federal contracts.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 2014
We're in a new Gilded Age of wealth and power similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation's antitrust laws were enacted. Those laws should prevent or bust up concentrations of economic power that not only harm consumers but also undermine our democracy -- such as Comcast's pending acquisition of Time Warner Cable. In 1890, when Republican Sen. John Sherman of Ohio urged his congressional colleagues to act against the centralized industrial powers that threatened America, he didn't distinguish between economic and political power because they were one and the same.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 2014
We're in a new Gilded Age of wealth and power similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation's antitrust laws were enacted. Those laws should prevent or bust up concentrations of economic power that not only harm consumers but also undermine our democracy -- such as Comcast's pending acquisition of Time Warner Cable. In 1890, when Republican Sen. John Sherman of Ohio urged his congressional colleagues to act against the centralized industrial powers that threatened America, he didn't distinguish between economic and political power because they were one and the same.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 1, 2013
If you want a taste of the Gilded Age, just plunk down $450,000, the asking price for a Baltimore townhouse once owned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The author who gave us "The Great Gatsby" and other classics lived in Towson and Baltimore while wife Zelda was being treated for her mental health problems. Now the four-bedroom townhouse at 1307 Park Avenue in Bolton Hill is up for sale. Here's what the University of Baltimore's Literary Heritage says about his time here: "In 1932, Fitzgerald brought [Zelda]
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
FOR YEARS, the 46-room mansion at St. Paul and Preston streets in Baltimore was known as the "House of Mystery" -- a reference to its forbidding exterior, the high wall around its garden and the reclusive nature of former owner Ross Winans.Today, it's anything but a mystery. Although it still looks ominous on the outside, the building has become a hive of activity. After a period of dormancy in the mid-1990s, it has reopened as home to three divisions of Agora Inc., a publishing company that takes its name from the ancient Greek agora, or marketplace.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2000
Hard money. Soft money. In the Gilded Age presidential election of 1888, it was just plain money - boodles of it raised in unprecedented amounts and expended in masterful ways. The key man in the making of President Benjamin Harrison, deservedly one of the lesser-known occupants of the White House, was Matthew S. Quay, the Republican boss of Pennsylvania. His grateful counterpart in New York, Thomas Platt, otherwise known as the "Easy Boss," called Quay "the ablest politician this country ever produced."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Jonnes and By Jill Jonnes,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2003
More than a hundred years ago, when the first really gargantuan American fortunes in steel, oil and railroads began to pile up, outraged citizens protested that the United States was fast becoming like some European plutocracy, where the corporate elite rigged the rules to further swell their wealth and power. Sound familiar? By 1912 the top 1 percent of Americans owned 56 percent of the nation's wealth. The top 10 percent owned 90 percent. Now, a century later, the word plutocracy has been dusted off and is back in play.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
We'll always have Paris," Humphrey Bogart famously said in Casablanca . Roland Park author and historian Jill Jonnes recalled her first visit in the 1960s to the Eiffel Tower, the enduring 1,000-foot-tall Parisian landmark that was the centerpiece of the 1889 World's Fair. Jonnes was living at the time with her family in Paris, where her father, an economist, worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development. "I was 6 or 7, and walking down those steps, you go round and round and round.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
After the Ball: Gilded Age Secrets, Boardroom Betrayals, and the Party That Ignited the Great Wall Street Scandal of 1905, by Patricia Beard. HarperCollins. 416 pages. $25.95. Patricia Beard started working seriously on this book in the late 1990s, as WorldCom, Tyco and the rest blossomed in rotten glory, and publishes it now, as the scent of scandal lingers in corporate suites. Good timing. Her subject - riches, envy and iniquity at the Equitable Life Assurance Society in the early 1900s - is a dandy, overlooked gem of business disgrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | August 30, 2007
If you thought that college was the only place to attend lectures on the Gilded Age, the Meiji period or the Han Dynasty, you would be mistaken. Look no further than the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show. Running today through Sunday, the 27th annual show will feature its first lecture series. Six lectures will be led by industry collectors, dealers and professionals who will highlight antiques specific to different periods. Today at 3 p.m., Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, will lead a discussion on a jewelry collection from the Gilded Age. Other lectures will cover such topics as Satsuma earthenware, smiling Sichuan statues, living and decorating with antiques and book collecting.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 13, 2010
I went to church in San Francisco on Sunday, the big stone church on Nob Hill, whose name is an old slang term for a rich person, where a gaggle of railroad tycoons built their palaces high above the squalid tenements of the poor back in the Gilded Age, and there with considerable pomp we baptized a dozen infants into the fellowship of faith and we renounced the evil powers of this world, which all in all is a good day's work. The term "evil powers" is one you hear only in the church, or in Marvel comic books, or Republican speeches, and it isn't something I renounce every day. I am a romantic Democrat, raised on William Saroyan and Pete Seeger and Preston Sturges, and we have faith in the decency of the little guy, and we believe you can depend on the kindness of strangers.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
We'll always have Paris," Humphrey Bogart famously said in Casablanca . Roland Park author and historian Jill Jonnes recalled her first visit in the 1960s to the Eiffel Tower, the enduring 1,000-foot-tall Parisian landmark that was the centerpiece of the 1889 World's Fair. Jonnes was living at the time with her family in Paris, where her father, an economist, worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development. "I was 6 or 7, and walking down those steps, you go round and round and round.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | August 30, 2007
If you thought that college was the only place to attend lectures on the Gilded Age, the Meiji period or the Han Dynasty, you would be mistaken. Look no further than the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show. Running today through Sunday, the 27th annual show will feature its first lecture series. Six lectures will be led by industry collectors, dealers and professionals who will highlight antiques specific to different periods. Today at 3 p.m., Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, will lead a discussion on a jewelry collection from the Gilded Age. Other lectures will cover such topics as Satsuma earthenware, smiling Sichuan statues, living and decorating with antiques and book collecting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | April 21, 2007
The destruction in 1964 of New York City's Pennsylvania Station, by its cash-strapped owner, the Pennsylvania Railroad, created international outrage. "Until the first blow fell, no one was convinced that Penn Station really would be demolished," said an editorial in The New York Times, "or that New York would permit this monumental act of vandalism against one of the largest and finest landmarks of its age of Roman elegance. "Any city gets what it admires, will pay for, and ultimately deserves," the editorial continued.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
There's no reason to know the name of Henry Drushel Perky, even though some readers probably enjoyed a bowl full of his invention this morning. Perky, an eccentric businessman and champion of vegetarianism who suffered from chronic stomach problems while making and losing fortunes, was the inventor in 1891 of the process that gave birth to Shredded Wheat, America's oldest packaged breakfast cereal. Perky's shredded wheat was introduced just ahead of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg's corn flakes, which debuted in 1895, and Post Grape-Nuts, which landed on breakfast tables in 1897.
NEWS
December 1, 2005
Relationships between lawmakers and lobbyists are so vulnerable to corruption that the line is easily crossed. Lawmakers depend increasingly on well-heeled lobbyists for the campaign contributions they need to stay in office; lobbyists need lawmakers to shape laws and spending decisions to benefit their clients. It's a short leap, really, from wealthy corporate and other interests showering campaign cash on sympathetic legislators to the sort of out-and-out bribery practiced by disgraced Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham and the defense industry lobbyists who plied him with at least $2.4 million in personal gifts in return for federal contracts.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
There's no reason to know the name of Henry Drushel Perky, even though some readers probably enjoyed a bowl full of his invention this morning. Perky, an eccentric businessman and champion of vegetarianism who suffered from chronic stomach problems while making and losing fortunes, was the inventor in 1891 of the process that gave birth to Shredded Wheat, America's oldest packaged breakfast cereal. Perky's shredded wheat was introduced just ahead of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg's corn flakes, which debuted in 1895, and Post Grape-Nuts, which landed on breakfast tables in 1897.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Taylor and Jonathan Taylor,Los Angeles Daily News | April 5, 1992
NEWPORT, R.I. -- It was 1893, and Cornelius Vanderbilt II was head of America's wealthiest, most famous family, so no mere A-frame cabin would suffice when it came time for him to build a summer vacation home.This was the Gilded Age, and the country's leading businessman -- the grandson of the original "Commodore" Vanderbilt -- needed a magnificent vacation home. It had to be the envy of rich neighbors and mere laborers alike.So Cornelius Vanderbilt commissioned the Breakers.Built in the pre-income-tax era, when the country's new wealthy class constructed monuments to their own success, the 70-room replica of a 16th century Italian palace is now a must-see for the 700,000-plus visitors who tour Newport's historic homes each year.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SHELDEN and MICHAEL SHELDEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
Mark Twain: A Life Ron Powers Free Press / 691 pages The trouble with theories, says Tom in Tom Sawyer Abroad, is that "there's always a hole in them somewheres, sure, if you look close enough." You would think the legions of critics and biographers who have spent the last 100 years theorizing about Mark Twain's genius might take a hint from Tom and show some restraint. But, no, they keep coming forward year after year, confidently speculating - often with little evidence to back them up - that Twain was secretly gay or a confirmed racist or a sour misogynist or simply a cynical, self-destructive monomaniac.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
After the Ball: Gilded Age Secrets, Boardroom Betrayals, and the Party That Ignited the Great Wall Street Scandal of 1905, by Patricia Beard. HarperCollins. 416 pages. $25.95. Patricia Beard started working seriously on this book in the late 1990s, as WorldCom, Tyco and the rest blossomed in rotten glory, and publishes it now, as the scent of scandal lingers in corporate suites. Good timing. Her subject - riches, envy and iniquity at the Equitable Life Assurance Society in the early 1900s - is a dandy, overlooked gem of business disgrace.
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