Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGig
IN THE NEWS

Gig

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1991
Talk about a tough itinerary! It's bad enough that Richard Marx's aptly named "Rush In, Rush Out" tour has him playing five cities in a single day, a schedule condensing a cross-country tour into a single 16-hour marathon, all to promote his new "Rush Street" album. But with first performance of the day slated for the ungodly (by rock musician standards) hour of 9 a.m., Marx is in for an unusually exhausting day.So who's harebrained idea was this?"That would have to be me," Marx says over the phone from his home in Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The Annapolis housing authority created a new position for Carl O. Snowden, whom the city's mayor decided not to reappoint to the authority's board. Snowden's five-year term as chairman of the board of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis is due to expire at the end of July. Mayor Mike Pantelides declined to reappoint Snowden. The housing authority board voted on Monday night to create a new position called "chairman emeritus" and appointed Snowden to the position. Snowden announced his new position later Monday at the Annapolis City Council meeting, after lambasting the mayor.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | April 9, 1995
Slash may be a lifelong Los Angeleno, but he has a fondness for our town. "I love Baltimore," he declares. "I'm probably one of the few people that actually say that, because Baltimore is not one of those places that the average kid is familiar with if you're not from there. But I've been enough times. It's a cool town."Among the things he likes about Baltimore is Hammerjacks, where Guns N' Roses played back before becoming famous. "I remember playing there," he says. "Hammerjacks is the gig -- I don't know if you should print this or not -- but it was the gig where . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Seeing J. Roddy Walston and the Business in concert always guarantees one thing: You'll leave much sweatier than you arrived. Since arriving in Baltimore from Tennessee in 2004, the quartet's workmanlike reputation has been built on its raucous, give-everything-you-have-and-more live show, where perspiration simply comes with the territory. But J. Roddy Walston and the Business were different from the other Baltimore-bred bands of the time. They weren't the lauded experimentalists of Animal Collective or the cloaked-in-mystery duo of Beach House.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Brady Anderson was in the lobby of the Hilton Anatole when another former player came up to him and congratulated him on his new gig with the Orioles. And what's that gig? Well Brady's not really saying. He's going to wait for the club to speak to that. For the past two years, Anderson, one of the most popular players in club history, has helped out his old team in an unspecified role. He's worked with players to improve their conditioning and at one point spent a chunk of time in Norfolk attempting to get Nolan Reimold out of his 2010 funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Picture it: Club Venus, Perring Plaza. One night in 1967, booking agent Bill Bateman brought in Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Responsible for making sure the crowd hears the music at the best possible level is the house soundman, Bob Goldstein. The familiar strains of "Sherry," "Rag Doll" and "Walk Like a Man" filled the place so effectively that night it changed Goldstein's life. Clair Brothers, the sound company from Pennsylvania that started in 1966 with a Four Seasons gig in Lancaster, offered Goldstein a job. "I dropped out of college and went on the road with the group in 1967," Goldstein said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | October 13, 2011
The remnants of pop-emo's heyday (the early aughts, let's say) are mainly carcasses, reunion tours and/or disappointing new albums that make fans wish their old favorite group would stop tarnishing its legacy. Thrice is an exception. The Orange County, Calif. quartet has evolved into an ambitious rock band that's more prog than punk. But there's still muscle to these songs, and even small, fleeting reminders of the group's hardcore roots. For proof, check out the band's set at Recher Theatre Saturday night, a more adrenaline-based show than the Arctic Monkeys/Smith Westerns gig at Rams Head Live that same night.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | August 1, 2002
It was a little before 7 on a steamy Baltimore evening when I found Martin O'Malley behind a stage on Mount Royal Avenue, tuning his guitar and making the mental transition from his day job to his night gig. "How's it going?" I said. "OK," he said, smiling. "You should get a beer." This, of course, is one of O'Malley's great strengths as a politician, the ability to take a question from the media while simultaneously dispensing excellent, non-partisan advice, even if it's off the subject.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd.com | May 15, 2009
There comes a point in every man's life when he sits back, puts his feet up on the desk and thinks: How can I get a gig doing something I love that involves no heavy lifting? Ladies and gentlemen, I have found that gig. So let's get the introductions out of the way first, shall we? The name is Kevin Cowherd, and after years of writing a features column for The Baltimore Sun, I switch over today to writing a sports column. Actually, this is my second time with this gig - I was a sports columnist with The Evening Sun from 1981 to 1987.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | January 16, 2009
NEW YORK - At Sarabeth's restaurant on Central Park South, two young old friends are catching up and comparing notes over breakfast. Anyone seated nearby quickly learns the story. They met in graduate school; both hold MBAs. Both recently have joined the swelling ranks of America's unemployed. Their shared tales, if once unthinkable, are becoming increasingly familiar. First, blue-collar jobs disappeared. Now white collars are fading. The young and briefly affluent, accustomed to earning more than $75,000, suddenly have time on their hands, the latest victims of the current economic crunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
After seven albums and nearly 15 years of leading the Baltimore alt-country act June Star, lead singer and songwriter Andrew Grimm finally sounds at ease about his band's place in the city's scene. The six-piece has a small but loyal following, and can play its favorite venues regularly. Still, he will forever identify June Star as a group of "underdogs," a label he lists - with a wink - on the band's Facebook page. "Saying we were 'under the radar' was self-deprecating, like a way to cope, but then it became a philosophy," Grimm said.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | October 25, 2012
Country music stars will get a whiff of Eldersburg next week. After being chosen as the official candle of the gift tent at the Country Music Awards on Nov. 1, in Nashville, the Eldersburg-based company, Unwined Candles, will have its products in gift bags for all participants. For owners and creators Dave and Anna Neith, that means late nights and full weekends as he makes more than 300 candles to take to Nashville. "It's a little overwhelming … a good problem to have," Dave Neith said.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | July 29, 2012
For Towson rock musician Mike Ruocco, there's only one thing to do when your next list of upcoming tour dates is announced: You see when you're coming home. "When you tour as extensively as I've done over the past 10 or so years, and you see the particular tour you're jumping on stops in Baltimore, everyone gets super excited," said Ruocco, 29. "There's nothing better than getting to come home, see your friends and family, and play a show for the community that's supported you from the very beginning.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
They say Martin O'Malley has designs on the White House. And he seems to have made himself at home there one night this week. Maryland's governor and his Irish rock band O'Malley's March scored a pretty big there Tuesday night, getting to play as part of a White House celebration for Irish Prime Minister Edna Kenny. (This after two shows Saturday night at Baltimore's Creative Alliance.) As the Sun's John Fritze reported earlier, O'Malley and his band set up in the stately East Room in front of about 200 people in green ties and shawls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012
If resurrecting Jimi Hendrix proves impossible, I'm going with the Dixie Chicks, who taught America that criticizing the president and singing a truly beautiful version of "The Star-Spangled Banner" are not mutually exclusive acts. Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun This singing business is overrated. I vote for an instrumental version - blues, say, or, better yet, surf-rock. Maybe Los Straitjackets? (With or without wrestling masks.) Anne Tallent, editor, b Here's my short-term memory kicking in: Kristin Chenoweth, who performed at the NFC Championship with the right balance of flair and traditionalism.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Brady Anderson was in the lobby of the Hilton Anatole when another former player came up to him and congratulated him on his new gig with the Orioles. And what's that gig? Well Brady's not really saying. He's going to wait for the club to speak to that. For the past two years, Anderson, one of the most popular players in club history, has helped out his old team in an unspecified role. He's worked with players to improve their conditioning and at one point spent a chunk of time in Norfolk attempting to get Nolan Reimold out of his 2010 funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith | February 7, 1992
As comedian Lord Carrett tells it, he started bagging audiences as a 3-year-old with off-color jokes in his father's bar in St. Petersburg, Fla."If I heard a joke, I always remembered it, even if I had no idea what I was talking about," he says. "People would fall off their stools to have this little tow-headed altar boy -- at that point I was in Catholic school -- come up and tell a filthy joke. It was like a mini Dice Clay."On Sundays, after I hung around with the priest, I would go into my family's bar and shoot pool with a convicted felon.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 25, 2000
I SEE WHERE Herm Hannan, the owner of Bo Brooks Crab House, says his new seafood restaurant in Canton will have a "nautical motif." Boy, that's a relief. I was worried he might do something with wagon wheels and cactus. Time magazine dissed Baltimore big-time during the mayoral campaign last summer. But, don't you worry, a British publication has us all dressed up and looking good again. The March edition of Bizarre, a schlock-shock-and-porn magazine, features a three-page spread of writer Jim Jazwiecki's 24-hour trip to Baltimore, headlined: "Home of John Waters [and]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | October 13, 2011
The remnants of pop-emo's heyday (the early aughts, let's say) are mainly carcasses, reunion tours and/or disappointing new albums that make fans wish their old favorite group would stop tarnishing its legacy. Thrice is an exception. The Orange County, Calif. quartet has evolved into an ambitious rock band that's more prog than punk. But there's still muscle to these songs, and even small, fleeting reminders of the group's hardcore roots. For proof, check out the band's set at Recher Theatre Saturday night, a more adrenaline-based show than the Arctic Monkeys/Smith Westerns gig at Rams Head Live that same night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | September 28, 2011
Bands come and go all of the time, but they are not all created equal. We were reminded of this not once, not twice, but three times in recent months, when three of Baltimore's most celebrated and seasoned acts announced their breakups. The Bridge, a bluesy staple of Federal Hill's 8x10 that eventually made it to the Bonnaroo and All Good music festivals, called it quits first via a letter on its website, placing the blame on the economy. "We were losing money, burning ourselves out and it wasn't translating into more people at the shows," singer Cris Jacobs says later.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.