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Gifted Education

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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Gifted students have a right to a larger share of state education dollars, said the members of a task force that gave its final report to the Maryland State Board of Education yesterday.But helping the brightest doesn't have to be at a cost to the majority of students, said task force leader William G. Durden of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth."Equity and excellence are not mutually exclusive," Dr. Durden said, adding that schools need to provide education that is an "optimal match" to each student's needs.
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NEWS
By Adina Amith | May 5, 2014
When my daughter was a freshman in high school, she shared a particularly uplifting experience from history class one day. In the middle of a lesson, a senior barged into the classroom with tears in his eyes and handed the teacher a letter. A smile spread across the teacher's face as he read in silence. The teacher then turned to the class and announced that the student had just received a full scholarship to an excellent college. The teen pointed toward the window and whispered, to the teacher, "If it hadn't been for you and this school, I'd be out on those streets selling drugs.
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NEWS
August 3, 1997
HERE'S THE GOOD news on gifted and talented education in Maryland: the State Board of Education is paying more attention to it. The governor added $500,000 in funding this year, for a total of $2.5 million. Comparative data will soon be available for the first time on how various school systems are doing. And a parents' group called MCGATE, Maryland's Coalition for Gifted and Talented Education, has blossomed into an active advocate on this issue.Here's the bad news: Gifted education is terribly politicized.
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | March 17, 2014
Life for high-ability and high-potential students in Maryland and the nation may be getting just a little bit brighter. After years of being silent on the issue, the state now requires that local school districts identify and serve gifted students, joining 27 states that require such actions. Unfortunately, Maryland does not provide any state funding to districts specifically to support this work, which means we may not have raised the floor for these students in some of the state's less well-off counties.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
The county Board of Education is seeking applicants for its citizen advisory committees. Membership is open to all Harford County residents, including those without children in the school system. Committees will meet as necessary to accomplish their missions. New members are confirmed in December to terms of one, two or three years. Harford residents interested in serving on a committee should send a letter of interest to Don Morrison, director of public information, Harford County Public Schools, 102 S. Hickory Ave., Bel Air 21014.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
The Board of Education of Harford County Public Schools is seeking applicants for its Citizen Advisory Committees. Membership is open to all Harford County residents, including those without children in the school system. Committees will meet as necessary to accomplish their charge. New members are confirmed in December to one-, two- or three-year terms. Harford residents interested in serving on any one of these committees should send a letter of interest to Teri Kranefeld, manager of communications, Harford County Public Schools, 102 S. Hickory Ave., Bel Air 21014.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Dee Heinrich thought her son's elementary school was one of the best in Anne Arundel County -- until she asked about its "gifted and talented" program."
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | March 17, 2014
Life for high-ability and high-potential students in Maryland and the nation may be getting just a little bit brighter. After years of being silent on the issue, the state now requires that local school districts identify and serve gifted students, joining 27 states that require such actions. Unfortunately, Maryland does not provide any state funding to districts specifically to support this work, which means we may not have raised the floor for these students in some of the state's less well-off counties.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1996
Can someone please tell me how to recognize whether a 4-year-old is gifted? Should I have my child tested?Susan Allen, Lebanon, Tenn.Watching a 4-year-old at play, listening to his questions and taking note of his energy and interest levels are probably the most important ways to tell whether a preschooler is gifted.To find out exactly how smart the child is, you'd have to take him to a psychologist for testing. But that I.Q. score is of questionable value in a preschool setting, many experts in the field of gifted education say."
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 28, 1996
GOVERN FROM the gut, colleagues tell Parris Glendening. Forget the polls. Ignore the pundits. Heed your inner ear.It is sound advice for a governor who midway through his first term has lurched from one controversy to another, and been ripped by Republicans and fellow Democrats alike. Only Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie had a shorter honeymoon.The fact is, Mr. Glendening is best when he governs intuitively, such as when he criticized the part of the president's welfare-reform package that would deny aid to legal immigrants.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
I was troubled that Casa de Maryland and the NAACP are against gifted and talented programs in Maryland public schools but I was not surprised ("Rules on gifted education criticized," Feb. 28). These groups that confuse equality with low educational expectations for minorities should step back and chill. When my children were in school, many PTA members whose children did not cut the mustard for gifted and talented programs went bustling up the school system's hierarchy to destroy those programs as too high brow, un-American and insufficiently egalitarian.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
Elaine Tuttle Hansen will never forget stepping into her first college class after years of feeling out of place as a smart kid in her small Massachusetts hometown. "It was like, 'Oh my God, there are people out there like me,'" she says. It's a sentiment often expressed by students who arrive at the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, where Hansen recently took over as executive director. After years of feeling misunderstood or unchallenged at their regular schools, these precocious elementary and middle schoolers say they finally feel "at home.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
The Board of Education of Harford County Public Schools is seeking applicants for its Citizen Advisory Committees. Membership is open to all Harford County residents, including those without children in the school system. Committees will meet as necessary to accomplish their charge. New members are confirmed in December to one-, two- or three-year terms. Harford residents interested in serving on any one of these committees should send a letter of interest to Teri Kranefeld, manager of communications, Harford County Public Schools, 102 S. Hickory Ave., Bel Air 21014.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
The county Board of Education is seeking applicants for its citizen advisory committees. Membership is open to all Harford County residents, including those without children in the school system. Committees will meet as necessary to accomplish their missions. New members are confirmed in December to terms of one, two or three years. Harford residents interested in serving on a committee should send a letter of interest to Don Morrison, director of public information, Harford County Public Schools, 102 S. Hickory Ave., Bel Air 21014.
NEWS
August 3, 1997
HERE'S THE GOOD news on gifted and talented education in Maryland: the State Board of Education is paying more attention to it. The governor added $500,000 in funding this year, for a total of $2.5 million. Comparative data will soon be available for the first time on how various school systems are doing. And a parents' group called MCGATE, Maryland's Coalition for Gifted and Talented Education, has blossomed into an active advocate on this issue.Here's the bad news: Gifted education is terribly politicized.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 28, 1996
GOVERN FROM the gut, colleagues tell Parris Glendening. Forget the polls. Ignore the pundits. Heed your inner ear.It is sound advice for a governor who midway through his first term has lurched from one controversy to another, and been ripped by Republicans and fellow Democrats alike. Only Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie had a shorter honeymoon.The fact is, Mr. Glendening is best when he governs intuitively, such as when he criticized the part of the president's welfare-reform package that would deny aid to legal immigrants.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
Elaine Tuttle Hansen will never forget stepping into her first college class after years of feeling out of place as a smart kid in her small Massachusetts hometown. "It was like, 'Oh my God, there are people out there like me,'" she says. It's a sentiment often expressed by students who arrive at the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, where Hansen recently took over as executive director. After years of feeling misunderstood or unchallenged at their regular schools, these precocious elementary and middle schoolers say they finally feel "at home.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1996
Can someone please tell me how to recognize whether a 4-year-old is gifted? Should I have my child tested?Susan Allen, Lebanon, Tenn.Watching a 4-year-old at play, listening to his questions and taking note of his energy and interest levels are probably the most important ways to tell whether a preschooler is gifted.To find out exactly how smart the child is, you'd have to take him to a psychologist for testing. But that I.Q. score is of questionable value in a preschool setting, many experts in the field of gifted education say."
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