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NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | February 17, 2010
As the General Assembly meets in Annapolis, it has its hands full. The devastating side effects of the economic recession must be addressed with urgency and devotion. As lawmakers address such pressing concerns as job creation, foreclosures and pension reform, they cannot ignore several critical education issues, including the curriculum and instruction available to children -- particularly those who show talent and potential in the classroom. Parents and teachers of gifted and talented children have long endured a lack of state resources and support.
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NEWS
March 15, 2014
For too long, education policy and practice at large have perpetuated two myths: That we must prioritize service and support for struggling learners at the expense of high-performing students and that gifted students don't need much support because they can do just fine on their own. Thankfully, officials at Catonsville Middle School are tearing down these impediments by offering a tutoring program focused on gifted and struggling students (...
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FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | May 21, 1993
Lots of parents blame television for turning their children into glassy-eyed couch potatoes, but a recently released study says TV can be a good thing, too, especially for bright kids.Parents who turn off the television may actually be depriving high-IQ children of an important source of learning, says a study published by a center for gifted children, based at the University of Connecticut."Gifted children . . . enjoy learning tasks that are often unstructured and flexible," the report says.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
New rules on school gifted and talented programs approved today by the state board of education have drawn fire from a coalition of groups that say such programs harm poor and minority students. The critics, which include Casa de Maryland and the Montgomery County NAACP, argue that the very act of labeling some students and not others as gifted creates winners and losers, and that the principal victims of such inequality are African-Americans, Hispanics and students from low-income families.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1995
When he was a student at the Moscow Conservatory, his teacher used to call Vladimir Feltsman a "white crow.""It meant I was different," Feltsman says.The teacher, Jacob Flier (1912-1977), was not only one of modern Russia's greatest pianists and pedagogues; he was also a shrewd judge of character. Feltsman, who performs tonight at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, is indeed a world-famous piano virtuoso. But he resembles not a whit the image those words connote.Instead of living in Manhattan, the center of America's classical music business, Feltsman chooses New Paltz, N.Y., an upstate community in the Catskills where the chief industries are catering to rock-climbers and cross-country skiers and selling crafts to tourists.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Dee Heinrich thought her son's elementary school was one of the best in Anne Arundel County -- until she asked about its "gifted and talented" program."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 17, 1997
Boris Slutsky exemplifies the truth of the aphorism that you are where you're from.Slutsky, who teaches piano at the Peabody Conservatory and who will give a recital tonight in Friedberg Concert Hall, came to this country from Russia in 1977 as a 15-year-old. For most of his adolescence and all of his adult life, he studied the piano at the best American conservatories. But when he plays the piano and teaches it, he remains very much a Russian."Whenever people ask me if I am glad my parents brought me to this country, I tell them that I am deeply grateful -- and I truly am," says the 35-year-old pianist, whose aureole of red-gold hair combines with his fair skin and eyes to make him resemble a saintly figure in a Russian icon.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
In most ways, Jeffrey Peck reminds you of every other healthy, alert 5 1/2 -year-old boy you've ever met: He's friendly, outgoing and loves to play with other children his own age. Yet Jeffrey is exceptional. Unlike most children his age, he's a voracious reader, and what he reads goes well beyond Dick and Jane.Consider this: When he was 2 months old, his second word was "book" (the first was "dad"). Today, Jeffrey's library contains about 2,000 volumes."He reads Shakespeare -- and understands it," says Dolores Peck, Jeffrey's mother.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1996
Can someone please tell me how to recognize whether a 4-year-old is gifted? Should I have my child tested?Susan Allen, Lebanon, Tenn.You've watched in amazement as your child grouped his plastic dinosaurs by types, immersed himself in imaginary play for hours on end and one day simply picked up a book and started reading. All before going to kindergarten.Seeing these signs of giftedness, parents often wonder, "What now?"In last week's column, we talked about how to tell if your young child is gifted and whether a preschooler should take an I.Q. test.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1999
Lynne Tucker describes herself as a parent on a mission.Worried that the Anne Arundel County school system is shortchanging gifted and talented pupils, Tucker and another parent have started an advocacy group to ensure that the needs of gifted children are met.Tucker has concerns about the school system's approach to dealing with gifted children in elementary and middle schools -- and their parents -- and hopes that the Gifted and Talented Association can...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Many parents braved the malls to find their children this year's must-have toy or the hottest gadget. But gifts come in many forms. My suggestion to parents is that they take steps in the months ahead to improve their finances in a way that will indirectly be a gift to their children. These steps won't elicit the oohs and aahs that an iPad does, but your children will be grateful someday that you took them. Here are a few: Make a will This is essential for parents of young children.
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | February 17, 2010
As the General Assembly meets in Annapolis, it has its hands full. The devastating side effects of the economic recession must be addressed with urgency and devotion. As lawmakers address such pressing concerns as job creation, foreclosures and pension reform, they cannot ignore several critical education issues, including the curriculum and instruction available to children -- particularly those who show talent and potential in the classroom. Parents and teachers of gifted and talented children have long endured a lack of state resources and support.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | November 18, 2007
Eileen McFarren's son catches on quickly, so he's sometimes asked to help teach his fourth-grade classmates when they don't understand. His mother wishes much more for him: a classroom where he is challenged every day. But his Severna Park elementary school doesn't have an extensive program for gifted children. Unlike most states, Maryland does not have regulations that require school districts to identify gifted students or provide them services. As a result, while some school systems have model gifted programs, others have done the minimum.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 24, 2006
Seventh-graders Alyssa Murphy and Luke Bullis passed out bags filled with a paddleball, a snowman magnet and a stuffed penguin to children coming into the University of Maryland Medical Center. After handing out the snowman-decorated bags to some children, the group of about 60 students from Southampton Middle School in Bel Air gathered to sing Christmas carols. The students were participating in an annual trip to the medical center with Judy Fida, a teacher's assistant at Southampton Middle.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,SUN COLUMNIST | May 21, 2006
Parents and grandparents leave all sorts of assets to younger heirs, but one with the potential to get significantly better with time is an individual retirement account. Children or grandchildren who inherit an IRA will be required to take minimum distributions each year from the account so that the money isn't locked up forever. Still, if they let the balance continue to grow tax-deferred in the account for years, if not decades, the rewards can be huge. How huge? Take the case of a 1-year-old grandchild who inherits $100,000 in an IRA, according Ed Slott's book, Parlay Your IRA Into a Family Fortune.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
Leri Slutsky, a veteran Baltimore Symphony Orchestra violinist and teacher of young violin students at the Peabody Conservatory, died of lung cancer at the Johns Hopkins Medical Center on Friday. The Pikesville resident was 72. Born in Baku, Azerbaijan, Mr. Slutsky began attending the Special School for Gifted Children there at age 7. His father, Lev, worked as an ophthalmologist; his mother, Rivekah, was a pianist. At 19, he earned a spot at the prestigious Moscow Conservatory to study with Yuri Yankelevich, who trained many renowned violinists.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
Anne Arundel County schools officials called a consultant's $175,000 study of the gifted and talented program inconclusive but said it provided leads on revamping a program many parents say is inadequate. The 30-page report -- which consultant KPMG spent more than a year preparing -- offers few specific suggestions for improving the county's programs for gifted students. Officials said they would need more expert guidance before determining how to proceed. "It does give us areas to improve, but they're not the specifics you would have hoped for and I would have hoped for," said Assistant Superintendent Nancy Mann.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Dr. Julian C. Stanley, a psychologist, researcher and pioneer in the field of identifying and teaching gifted students, died of pneumonia Friday at Howard County General Hospital. The Columbia resident was 87. More than 1 million middle school-age pupils have taken the College Board's SAT test as part of the talent searches Mr. Stanley developed to identify youngsters who excel academically. His work influenced school systems and colleges across the country. Dr. Stanley helped found the Center for Talented Youth at the Johns Hopkins University in 1979 and similar centers at Northwestern University in Illinois, Duke University in North Carolina and the University of Denver.
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