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By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
Infuriated by a plan they say would dismantle "gifted-and-talented" programs at 51 Baltimore elementary schools, parents demanded last night that the programs be preserved.Leaders of a group representing parents of about 3,000 students took issue with Superintendent Walter G. Amprey's plan to spread money for the programs, now spent only in the 51 schools, among all 120 elementary schools in the city.The proposal would kill gifted-and-talented programs, opponents told the school board, because schools couldn't afford the teachers' salaries.
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NEWS
May 28, 2014
In Minnesota Public Radio host Garrison Keillor's mythical town of Lake Woebegone, "all the men are strong, all the women are good-looking, and all the children are above average. " Notwithstanding the statistical improbability of that latter claim, it's at least true of the kids enrolled in the Baltimore City public schools' gifted and talented programs. Whether they're really smarter, or have some special affinity for math or music, or just work harder and stay more focused than their peers really doesn't matter.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening proposed yesterday spending $500,000 next year to help the state's schools do a better job of serving gifted students.The initiative, which the governor calls his "Excellence in Education" program, would help train teachers to better identify students who ought to be enrolled in gifted-and-talented programs and encourage school systems to develop more programs for those students.Glendening said he expected the amount devoted to the effort to double, to $1 million, the following year.
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | March 17, 2014
Life for high-ability and high-potential students in Maryland and the nation may be getting just a little bit brighter. After years of being silent on the issue, the state now requires that local school districts identify and serve gifted students, joining 27 states that require such actions. Unfortunately, Maryland does not provide any state funding to districts specifically to support this work, which means we may not have raised the floor for these students in some of the state's less well-off counties.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
Baltimore County schools' gifted-and-talented program is characterized by "flux, confusion and dissimilarity," and needs a major restructuring, says a team of independent consultants in a report released yesterday.Too many students are in the program for it to be truly considered a "gifted" group, and the quality of teachers and instruction varies greatly among schools, they said in a summary presented to the school board last night.The highly critical report is the latest flash point in a controversy that has simmered for at least three years, since Superintendent Stuart Berger announced he would review the oft-heralded program with an eye toward making it "more inclusive" and, thus, less elite.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
One of the latest victims of the budget squeeze in Howard County is its vaunted gifted and talented program, which could see its purse cut by as much as 20 percent under School Superintendent Michael Hickey's spending plan.The proposed $500,000 in cuts to the gifted and talented program's $2.58 million budget include eliminating a dozen tTC teaching positions and cutting funds for teacher training, textbooks, supplies and after-school art, music and dance programs. The cuts could go much deeper if lawmakers in Annapolis pass a bill that would let counties reduce their mandated spending on schools this year.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
"Enrichment Valley School" opened for learning Friday morning inside Bollman Bridge Elementary School, giving students a taste of the one-room schoolhouse of the 1940s.Three dozen fifth-graders in the Jessup school's gifted and talented program spent the day on lessons taken from 1942, working on penmanship, constructing Valentine's Day hearts for soldiers and diagramming sentences."It's been pretty fun, but I prefer '90s-style education to '40s-style education," said 10-year-old Sarah Tolliver who, like all other girls in the class that day, wore a dress in the style of the 1940s.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
The school board voted unanimously last week to support a major expansion of the county's limited gifted and talented student program.As a first step, the board approved a $195,000 budget for gifted and talented programs next school year. Until now, no money has been budgeted specifically for the program, said Henry E. Riecks, chairman of the county steering committee on education for the gifted and talented.The expansion would seek to offer the county's programs for the gifted and talented not only to students who exhibit a high degree of intelligence but also to those who show high levels of creativity and motivation, the committee recommended to the board.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Many elementary students participating in Howard County's gifted-and-talented program are seeing substantial changes in the way they're receiving the enrichment activities this fall. For second-graders throughout the couch methods -- as under the previous version of the gifted-and-talented program.Instead, each school will identify students with different academic talents and design ways to teach to those pupils' particular strengths -- ways that are more closely linked to their regular classroom work.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
Howard County's gifted and talented program for elementary school children will change next school year, when all schools will try a different way of teaching precocious pupils.The change involves the second grades in all elementary schools and all grades in six elementaries.Students no longer will be formally tested to be in the gifted and talented program, nor will they be pulled out of class to work on "Type II" projects intended to help them learn research methods and critical thinking skills.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
I read Gina Eichman's letter praising parents' and teachers' commitment to their children's musical pursuits and in particular praising the efforts and ingenuity of the Howard County Gifted and Talented (GT) High School Orchestra. I second her praise and am an avid music supporter, as are my children. Unfortunately, the opportunity she references is not available to all young musicians in the county: Those students who attend private schools are prohibited from joining the county GT group.
EXPLORE
February 28, 2012
Baltimore County Public School's Citizens Advisory Group on Gifted and Talented education will host a panel discussion, "Life as a BCPS GT School Student," on Wednesday, March 7, at Cockeysville Middle School, 10401 Greenside Drive, from 7 to 9 p.m. Fourth- and fifth-grade elementary students will talk about their experiences as GT students, followed by a mixed middle and high school panel. Students on the panels come from Pot Spring and Padonia elementary schools; Hereford, Cockeysville and Franklin middle schools; and Carver, Dulaney, Hereford and Towson high schools.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
New rules on school gifted and talented programs approved today by the state board of education have drawn fire from a coalition of groups that say such programs harm poor and minority students. The critics, which include Casa de Maryland and the Montgomery County NAACP, argue that the very act of labeling some students and not others as gifted creates winners and losers, and that the principal victims of such inequality are African-Americans, Hispanics and students from low-income families.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
A summer program that offers gifted students an opportunity to pursue such passions as building a robot, exploring the science of the Chesapeake Bay, playing jazz or learning the physics of solar power has been sliced out of Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget for 2010. The Maryland Summer Centers for Gifted Students have run for 42 years but will end after this summer if advocates for gifted students and their parents can't persuade the administration to restore the funding, about $413,000.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
Schools real key to city's renewal In an article about the apparent demise of high-rise condominiums as Baltimore's economic development engine, I was pleased to see Richard Clinch of the University of Baltimore acknowledge the necessity of improving our public schools ("Project stall," April 27). Few residents of Baltimore would agree that building a high-rise condo across the street from their house is the key to renewing their neighborhood. Here at ground level, we know that an essential step in revitalizing a neighborhood is to establish a safe and healthy environment for youths and to demonstrate to prospective residents that their children can go to good public schools.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
The fourth annual Howard County Student Film Festival, created through the Howard County Public School System's Gifted and Talented Intern/Mentor Program, is seeking original film submissions from high school students from public and private schools in the county. The films must be 3 to 10 minutes in length, original and family friendly. For additional guidelines, see www.hocofilm festival.com. The deadline for submissions is Friday. Information: hocofilmfestival@gmail.com.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
In most ways, Jeffrey Peck reminds you of every other healthy, alert 5 1/2 -year-old boy you've ever met: He's friendly, outgoing and loves to play with other children his own age. Yet Jeffrey is exceptional. Unlike most children his age, he's a voracious reader, and what he reads goes well beyond Dick and Jane.Consider this: When he was 2 months old, his second word was "book" (the first was "dad"). Today, Jeffrey's library contains about 2,000 volumes."He reads Shakespeare -- and understands it," says Dolores Peck, Jeffrey's mother.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
The fourth annual Howard County Student Film Festival, created through the Howard County Public School System's Gifted and Talented Intern/Mentor Program, is seeking original film submissions from high school students from public and private schools in the county. The films must be 3 to 10 minutes in length, original and family friendly. For additional guidelines, see www.hocofilm festival.com. The deadline for submissions is Friday. Information: hocofilmfestival@gmail.com.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | September 28, 2007
Alexander Boser started reading at an early age and was devouring Harry Potter books by the time he was 4. "There really wasn't a sign of a problem except that this kid just wanted to read all the time," said his mother, Katharina Boser. But the youngster, now 10, has been diagnosed with attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder (ADHD). He gets anxious in school, is sensitive to criticism and has trouble memorizing facts, Boser said. Even though he is in a Gifted-and-Talented math class at his Ellicott City elementary school, he also has an individualized education program (IEP)
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