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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1990
LONDON -- The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility yesterday for Tuesday's shooting of the former governor of Gibraltar, where three IRA members were killed by British security forces in 1988.Sir Peter Terry, 63, who was also military commander-in-chief of "The Rock" until he retired last year, was hit by a burst of automatic gunfire as he sat reading in his home in the Midlands village of Milford, near the town of Stafford.He was the latest in a series of public figures attacked by the IRA in England despite stepped-up security.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2013
Beyonce has chosen to go with a new pixie cut, a Russian man has sued a bank after they refuesed to honor the (modified) contract they signed, and the email provider previously used by former Marylander Edward Snowden has shut down under what appears to be a mysterious gag order. Welcome to your trends report for August 9, 2013. Trending now What: Beyonce Haircut Where: Google search Why: This latest move may mark her continued foray into the land of androgyny and general boss-itude.
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NEWS
By Maureen Conners and Maureen Conners,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
GIBRALTAR -- Richard Duo has a fond kinship for the Rock apes that inhabit this British colony.The 62-year-old Gibraltarian was born on the Rock. The Rock apes have been here much longer, at least 300 years. "Let's go to see my relatives further up," Duo says as he drives a taxi with six visitors to the Upper Rock.Many legends reside with the Rock apes, which aren't really apes but tailless macaque monkeys. The most popular: Gibraltar will be British as long as the monkeys are here. When the monkeys leave, the British will leave.
TRAVEL
August 16, 2009
I retired to West Fenwick Island, Del., but prior to that, I was a resident of Howard County for 35 years. In March, my husband Gary and I traveled to Europe. One of our stops was Gibraltar, where we photographed this view overlooking the harbor from the very top of the Rock of Gibraltar. In the background are the hills of Spain. There are some 250 Barbary macaques that inhabit the green mountaintop. They are extremely friendly and vie for your attention. In this photo, the macaque is opening a sunflower seed which was retrieved from my pocket.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 1992
Continuing the industry trend toward fewer but larger banks, BankAmerica Corp. announced plans yesterday to acquire $7.5 billion of deposits from First Gibraltar Savings, a Dallas-based savings and loan, and First Union Corp. said it would buy Dominion Bankshares, a $9.4 billion banking company based in Roanoke, Va.Both BankAmerica, which operates large banks in seven states, and First Union, which will now have large banks in six states, are old hands at acquiring other companies. Analysts expect them to move quickly to improve the profits of their new acquisitions by cutting costs.
FEATURES
March 20, 2006
March 20 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1969: John Lennon married Yoko Ono in Gibraltar. 1976: Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup.
TRAVEL
August 16, 2009
I retired to West Fenwick Island, Del., but prior to that, I was a resident of Howard County for 35 years. In March, my husband Gary and I traveled to Europe. One of our stops was Gibraltar, where we photographed this view overlooking the harbor from the very top of the Rock of Gibraltar. In the background are the hills of Spain. There are some 250 Barbary macaques that inhabit the green mountaintop. They are extremely friendly and vie for your attention. In this photo, the macaque is opening a sunflower seed which was retrieved from my pocket.
NEWS
February 20, 1999
U.S., Russia military agree to cooperate on Y2K bug solutionMOSCOW -- U.S. and Russian military experts agreed yesterday that they should act together to tackle the millennium computer bug amid uncertainty as to what effect the onset of the year 2000 would have on Russia's nuclear arsenal.Russia has begun to acknowledge that its military may be affected by the Y2K problem, but it is unclear where the cash-strapped country would get the funds or how it could solve the problem in only 10 months.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013
Beyonce has chosen to go with a new pixie cut, a Russian man has sued a bank after they refuesed to honor the (modified) contract they signed, and the email provider previously used by former Marylander Edward Snowden has shut down under what appears to be a mysterious gag order. Welcome to your trends report for August 9, 2013. Trending now What: Beyonce Haircut Where: Google search Why: This latest move may mark her continued foray into the land of androgyny and general boss-itude.
TOPIC
February 24, 2002
The Crisis A videotape showed the killing of kidnapped Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan. An inactive Army National Guardsman was arrested for allegedly trying to sneak a nonfunctioning military explosive through airport security in Los Angeles. Six widows and a mother of Sept. 11 victims sued Osama bin Laden and 140 others in an effort to "bankrupt terrorist organizations forever." Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld acknowledged that 16 Afghans killed by American troops were not members of the Taliban or al-Qaida, but did not say the mission was wrong.
FEATURES
March 20, 2006
March 20 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1969: John Lennon married Yoko Ono in Gibraltar. 1976: Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup.
TOPIC
February 24, 2002
The Crisis A videotape showed the killing of kidnapped Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan. An inactive Army National Guardsman was arrested for allegedly trying to sneak a nonfunctioning military explosive through airport security in Los Angeles. Six widows and a mother of Sept. 11 victims sued Osama bin Laden and 140 others in an effort to "bankrupt terrorist organizations forever." Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld acknowledged that 16 Afghans killed by American troops were not members of the Taliban or al-Qaida, but did not say the mission was wrong.
NEWS
By Maureen Conners and Maureen Conners,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
GIBRALTAR -- Richard Duo has a fond kinship for the Rock apes that inhabit this British colony.The 62-year-old Gibraltarian was born on the Rock. The Rock apes have been here much longer, at least 300 years. "Let's go to see my relatives further up," Duo says as he drives a taxi with six visitors to the Upper Rock.Many legends reside with the Rock apes, which aren't really apes but tailless macaque monkeys. The most popular: Gibraltar will be British as long as the monkeys are here. When the monkeys leave, the British will leave.
NEWS
February 20, 1999
U.S., Russia military agree to cooperate on Y2K bug solutionMOSCOW -- U.S. and Russian military experts agreed yesterday that they should act together to tackle the millennium computer bug amid uncertainty as to what effect the onset of the year 2000 would have on Russia's nuclear arsenal.Russia has begun to acknowledge that its military may be affected by the Y2K problem, but it is unclear where the cash-strapped country would get the funds or how it could solve the problem in only 10 months.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 1992
Continuing the industry trend toward fewer but larger banks, BankAmerica Corp. announced plans yesterday to acquire $7.5 billion of deposits from First Gibraltar Savings, a Dallas-based savings and loan, and First Union Corp. said it would buy Dominion Bankshares, a $9.4 billion banking company based in Roanoke, Va.Both BankAmerica, which operates large banks in seven states, and First Union, which will now have large banks in six states, are old hands at acquiring other companies. Analysts expect them to move quickly to improve the profits of their new acquisitions by cutting costs.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1990
LONDON -- The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility yesterday for Tuesday's shooting of the former governor of Gibraltar, where three IRA members were killed by British security forces in 1988.Sir Peter Terry, 63, who was also military commander-in-chief of "The Rock" until he retired last year, was hit by a burst of automatic gunfire as he sat reading in his home in the Midlands village of Milford, near the town of Stafford.He was the latest in a series of public figures attacked by the IRA in England despite stepped-up security.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
The recent death of Capt. Paul J. Esbensen, 76, of Stevensville, who was a highly respected wreck investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board and a well-known port figure, recalled his role investigating the loss of the SS Poet more than two decades ago. He had spent 15 years as senior marine investigator for the NTSB before retiring in 1996. During his tenure with the NTSB, he investigated 25 major maritime accidents, including the Poet and the loss of the Pride of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. -- Europe's superstar miler, Rock of Gibraltar, will remain at his familiar distance and on his familiar surface Saturday in the Breeders' Cup at Arlington Park. Aiden O'Brien, his Irish trainer, entered the 3-year-old colt in the Mile on turf before post positions were drawn yesterday for the eight races. O'Brien had toyed with running Rock of Gibraltar, a winner of seven straight Group I stakes, in the Classic at 1 1/4 miles on dirt. Mike Dillon, racing manager for Alex Ferguson, one of Rock of Gibraltar's owners, said O'Brien would have entered the colt in the Classic if his primary Classic entrant, Hawk Wing, had trained poorly.
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