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Giant Panda

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By COX NEWSPAPERS | November 5, 1999
ATLANTA -- High above the Pacific Ocean, two special passengers from China are making their way to Atlanta.Two giant panda cubs left Beijing at 5: 23 p.m. EST yesterday on a specially equipped United Parcel Service jet for a 17-hour flight to Zoo Atlanta.Lun-Lun and Yang-Yang, accompanied by a Zoo Atlanta veterinarian, a Chinese vet and a Chinese keeper, were scheduled to arrive at Hartsfield International Airport at 9: 30 this morning."The pandas are doing extremely well," the Zoo Atlanta vet, Rita McManamon, reported from Beijing.
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NEWS
The Washington Post | August 26, 2013
For a few terrifying minutes Saturday night, keepers at the National Zoo thought their precious day-old giant panda cub might be dead. The zoo's panda cameras appeared to show the vibrant, squirming cub of Friday now lying silent and unresponsive on the abdomen of its mother, Mei Xiang. Memories of the death of the zoo's six-day-old panda cub last September came flooding back. Then the keepers heard robust squealing coming from elsewhere. They realized - to their joy and sorrow - that what they were seeing on camera wasn't the first cub, but the stillborn body of a second cub. "In the circle of life there are always joys and sadnesses," Don Moore, the zoo's associate director of animal care sciences, said Sunday.
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FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The camera lights were so bright that it looked as though a spaceship had touched down in the thicket of bamboo outside the panda exhibit, and perhaps one had. Certainly it seemed like every earthbound news outlet was there: television crews from China, Russia and England, writers from both U.S. coasts. All told, about 100 journalists clamored to pose the important questions of the day: Did he get mommy's round eye spots or daddy's bean-shaped ones? He doesn't look like a stick of butter anymore - does he?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
A giant panda named Huaao plays on a tree in the snow at a zoo in Yantai, China.  
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
A giant panda named Huaao plays on a tree in the snow at a zoo in Yantai, China.  
NEWS
October 4, 2000
ZOO ZONE What's for dinner? Red pandas eat bamboo, acorns, roots and berries. Hiding in Trees Even though the red panda looks like a raccoon and resembles a cat -- this bear is most related to the giant panda. It hides, eats and sleeps high in the treetops, using its long, bushy tail like a pillow and to keep warm. The panda's thick red fur helps it camouflage (hide) to avoid predators like snow leopards. Do you know? Where do red pandas live? Answer: Red pandas are native to the Southwest slopes of the Himalayan Mountains.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
Ling-Ling, the solitary, roly-poly giant panda who drew millions to the National Zoo in Washington, died last December at the age of 23. But this morning, an adorable user-friendly statue made in her memory will be dedicated outside the zoo's panda house -- where Hsing-Hsing, her aging partner, still resides."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hsing-Hsing, the National Zoo's giant panda who for more than a quarter-century served as diplomat, research subject and sweet-natured delight to millions, died yesterday morning. Zookeepers gave the panda a lethal injection after deciding that irreversible kidney disease had made his life too painful to endure. He was 28, an advanced age for a panda. Hsing-Hsing and his longtime female denmate, Ling-Ling, who died in 1992, were gifts to the United States from Mao Tse-tung in commemoration of President Richard M. Nixon's ice-breaking trip to China in 1972.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | December 19, 1999
The death of the giant panda, Hsing-Hsing, a few weeks ago saddened his keepers at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and was a blow to zoo visitors who looked forward to observing the cuddly native of China.But Hsing-Hsing's death from kidney disease also highlights the debate over the plight of endangered animals and whether artificial reproduction -- perhaps even cloning -- should be used to keep them alive as man destroys their habitats.The National Zoo doesn't expect to find a replacement anytime soon for Hsing-Hsing, the 28-year-old giant panda who charmed children and their parents after the Chinese government presented him to the United States as a gift in 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen | jill.rosen@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2010
After a long winter stuck inside, no one's looking more eagerly toward spring than Baltimore families. It's time to get the kids outside and reconnected with nature, wildlife and the exotic critters someone can run into only at a zoo, aquarium or nature center. Over the chilly months, some of the area's favorite animal attractions got older, wiser and -- who knows? -- maybe even a bit cuter, even as a new baby or two arrived on the scene. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had a particularly rough winter and is especially hopeful that animal lovers return this spring in droves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen | jill.rosen@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2010
After a long winter stuck inside, no one's looking more eagerly toward spring than Baltimore families. It's time to get the kids outside and reconnected with nature, wildlife and the exotic critters someone can run into only at a zoo, aquarium or nature center. Over the chilly months, some of the area's favorite animal attractions got older, wiser and -- who knows? -- maybe even a bit cuter, even as a new baby or two arrived on the scene. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had a particularly rough winter and is especially hopeful that animal lovers return this spring in droves.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The camera lights were so bright that it looked as though a spaceship had touched down in the thicket of bamboo outside the panda exhibit, and perhaps one had. Certainly it seemed like every earthbound news outlet was there: television crews from China, Russia and England, writers from both U.S. coasts. All told, about 100 journalists clamored to pose the important questions of the day: Did he get mommy's round eye spots or daddy's bean-shaped ones? He doesn't look like a stick of butter anymore - does he?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Celebrity pregnancies are media magnets. But no human movie star has had to endure a Web site displaying her hormone charts, regular updates on her behavior and live shots of her bedroom interactions with the man in her life. Then again, the survival of the species is unlikely to depend on the resulting baby, as is the case with Mei Xiang and her mate, Tian Tian, the stars of the National Zoo's Giant Panda Exhibit. The fascination with the pandas' sex lives has been a springtime Washington ritual for many years, and the zoo is using its Web site, nationalzoo.
NEWS
October 4, 2000
ZOO ZONE What's for dinner? Red pandas eat bamboo, acorns, roots and berries. Hiding in Trees Even though the red panda looks like a raccoon and resembles a cat -- this bear is most related to the giant panda. It hides, eats and sleeps high in the treetops, using its long, bushy tail like a pillow and to keep warm. The panda's thick red fur helps it camouflage (hide) to avoid predators like snow leopards. Do you know? Where do red pandas live? Answer: Red pandas are native to the Southwest slopes of the Himalayan Mountains.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | December 19, 1999
The death of the giant panda, Hsing-Hsing, a few weeks ago saddened his keepers at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and was a blow to zoo visitors who looked forward to observing the cuddly native of China.But Hsing-Hsing's death from kidney disease also highlights the debate over the plight of endangered animals and whether artificial reproduction -- perhaps even cloning -- should be used to keep them alive as man destroys their habitats.The National Zoo doesn't expect to find a replacement anytime soon for Hsing-Hsing, the 28-year-old giant panda who charmed children and their parents after the Chinese government presented him to the United States as a gift in 1972.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hsing-Hsing, the National Zoo's giant panda who for more than a quarter-century served as diplomat, research subject and sweet-natured delight to millions, died yesterday morning. Zookeepers gave the panda a lethal injection after deciding that irreversible kidney disease had made his life too painful to endure. He was 28, an advanced age for a panda. Hsing-Hsing and his longtime female denmate, Ling-Ling, who died in 1992, were gifts to the United States from Mao Tse-tung in commemoration of President Richard M. Nixon's ice-breaking trip to China in 1972.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Celebrity pregnancies are media magnets. But no human movie star has had to endure a Web site displaying her hormone charts, regular updates on her behavior and live shots of her bedroom interactions with the man in her life. Then again, the survival of the species is unlikely to depend on the resulting baby, as is the case with Mei Xiang and her mate, Tian Tian, the stars of the National Zoo's Giant Panda Exhibit. The fascination with the pandas' sex lives has been a springtime Washington ritual for many years, and the zoo is using its Web site, nationalzoo.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
WOLONG, China -- The bamboo forests around this steep mountain gorge were to be a refuge for one of the world's most appealing animals, a safe haven where China would protect the giant panda from extinction.But this reserve high in Sichuan province's Qionglai Mountains -- and other Chinese efforts to save the panda -- have failed to forestall the species' impending demise, Western experts who have worked here say.China's panda-protection work has been plagued by inadequate funding, mismanagement of the animal's habitat, low-quality research and in-fighting between government ministries, the scientists say.Scarce funds that could have been used to protect wild pandas have been misspent on increasing pens for captive pandas, which are being filled with animals unnecessarily taken from the wild, the experts say.A computer analysis at an international seminar last year projected that, if current trends continue, the giant panda will be extinct within three decades, says Miles Roberts, deputy head of research at Washington's National Zoo. Only 700 to 1,000 wild pandas remain.
NEWS
By COX NEWSPAPERS | November 5, 1999
ATLANTA -- High above the Pacific Ocean, two special passengers from China are making their way to Atlanta.Two giant panda cubs left Beijing at 5: 23 p.m. EST yesterday on a specially equipped United Parcel Service jet for a 17-hour flight to Zoo Atlanta.Lun-Lun and Yang-Yang, accompanied by a Zoo Atlanta veterinarian, a Chinese vet and a Chinese keeper, were scheduled to arrive at Hartsfield International Airport at 9: 30 this morning."The pandas are doing extremely well," the Zoo Atlanta vet, Rita McManamon, reported from Beijing.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 3, 1999
RECENTLY, MY wife and I and our 8-year-old visited the world-famous National Zoo in Washington, where we saw firsthand why it has earned the singular distinction: "More Ice Cream Stands Per Acre Than Any Other Zoo on Earth." Actually, this is a wonderful zoo and we arrived just in time (9: 30 in the morning) to see the cheetahs being exercised. The way this works is that the cheetahs begin with some light calisthenics -- jumping jacks, push-ups, that sort of thing -- and then play a little two-on-two basketball.
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