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By LAURA VECSEY | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - It took Jason Giambi a few long days to make his decision. The Yankees wanted him. He wanted to be a Yankee, if for no other reason than his father had always loved the Bombers and Mickey Mantle was the baseball hero in the Giambi house. But after meeting last winter with George Steinbrenner and after understanding that he was the No. 1 big kahuna in a deflated free-agent market, Giambi stalled. Days passed and the Yankees, eager to get on with business, grew impatient. "We thought he could be the important cog that could spur our offense," Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said last night.
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April 20, 2009
1 Pie for breakfast: Good morning, sleepyheads. The Orioles and Red Sox are on MASN HD at 11 a.m. 2 Pi for dinner: The Bowie Baysox are celebrating 3.14159265 ... during a 7:05 p.m. home game against Erie. 3 Plate coverage: The Athletics' Jason Giambi visits his old pals at the new Yankee Stadium (ESPN, 7 p.m.). 4 Dishing it: Pass time with Jason Kidd and Tony Parker in the Mavericks-Spurs playoff game (9:30 p.m., TNT). 5 Last slice: Polish your clubs and check out baltimoresun.
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SPORTS
October 10, 2003
NEW YORK -- The Yankee Stadium batting cage was a good spot for a Giambi family homecoming last night. Jason, the Yankees' $120 million designated hitter, was hugging his brother Jeremy, a Red Sox player who, despite being on the disabled list, was allowed to take batting practice before Game 2 of this American League Championship Series. Between the brothers was father John. All his life, John Giambi's favorite baseball player was Mickey Mantle. All his life, his favorite team -- despite living in Southern California -- was the Yankees.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | November 5, 2008
A.J. Burnett told the Toronto Blue Jays yesterday that he will opt out of the remaining two seasons of his five-year, $55 million contract. The pitcher will forfeit $24 million and can file for free agency. His contract called for a $6 million signing bonus, a $1 million salary in 2006 and $12 million in the remaining four seasons. Blue Jays general manager J.P. Ricciardi said talks will continue on the possibility of a new deal for the hard-throwing right-hander, who turns 32 in January.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 30, 2005
If you were looking for a perfect postscript to this strange Orioles season, maybe it was the moonshot that landed on Eutaw Street in the first inning of the last home game at Camden Yards this year. Jason Giambi, who held a news conference in February to deliver a non-specific apology to Yankees fans for his alleged involvement in the BALCO steroid scandal, launched a towering three-run shot off Erik Bedard and got an enthusiastic ovation from the pro-pinstripe crowd that has long since forgiven him for whatever it was he did that required forgiveness.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Patience is supposed to be a virtue, so who could blame the Orioles if they decide to spend another year or two developing their best young prospects and building a better long-term future? The answer is, well, everyone. The club's admirable attempt to rebuild from the bottom up has presented Orioles fans with some fresh faces and some room for hope that the next three years will be much better than the last. But it is clear that the time has come to accelerate the process. There are too many empty seats, whether they have been sold or not. There is too little real punch in the batting order, and too little minor-league position depth to believe that a great offensive attack will suddenly spring forth from the player development system.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2001
Less than a year after the Oakland Athletics proved it was possible to reach the playoffs with a small-market payroll, there are rumblings that the rising tide of baseball economics will soon submerge them again. The club's attempt to re-sign 2000 American League Most Valuable Player Jason Giambi has run aground, leading to speculation that the A's may trade him before the July 31 waiver deadline. Sounds crazy, but it's not. Giambi and the A's have been trying to finalize a six-year, $91 million deal since spring training, but the negotiations have been hung up over Giambi's desire for a no-trade clause.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | December 3, 2004
BANISHED, EXPELLED. And, by the way, Jason Giambi: That $120 million contract you pumped yourself full of steroids to secure? It's now null and void. That's what the commissioner of baseball ought to declare for the Yankees' steroid-slugging slugger. Sorry, son. Hope your pituitary tumor gets better. Health is far more important than home runs, especially if the homers came courtesy of human growth hormone and other forms of muscle-popping, body-damaging steroids. Needles in the buttocks, cream on the legs, drops on the tongue: It's a wonder Giambi doesn't have mysterious appendages where there shouldn't be appendages.
SPORTS
By BOB FORD and BOB FORD,The Philadelphia Inquirer | June 25, 2007
Jason Giambi, apparently a little slow on the uptake, has finally learned the biggest truth about baseball's continuing wrangle with the issue of steroids: Honesty will get you nowhere. What honesty got Giambi last week was a date with former Sen. George Mitchell, the leader of baseball's official investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Mitchell must be tickled about it, because 15 months into his investigation he hadn't talked to a single active player, which was making it difficult to find stuff to put between the covers of his report.
NEWS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
New York Yankees slugger Jason Giambi became the new face of baseball's steroid scandal yesterday, when a published report revealed his admission, in grand jury testimony, that he took steroids provided by the personal trainer of San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds. Giambi, 33, had publicly denied using steroids, but the San Francisco Chronicle obtained his testimony in the federal inquiry in the BALCO labs case from December 2003, in which he describes using a syringe to inject human growth hormone into his stomach and testosterone into his buttocks.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
With their ace facing a pitcher who hadn't been on a major league mound in more than 500 days, the Orioles were in prime position last night to win one against an unusually mortal New York Yankees team. Instead, the Orioles found plenty of ways to hand the Yankees a 5-3 win in a game that featured close plays, a failure to hit in the clutch and manager Dave Trembley's fourth ejection of the season. Much-maligned Yankees right-hander Carl Pavano, who was 10 days removed from getting bashed by the Orioles' Double-A affiliate, the Bowie Baysox, was in trouble in all but one of the five innings he pitched But the Orioles, who had runners on first and second with no outs in three of their first four innings, were just 1-for-8 with runners in scoring position against Pavano (1-0)
SPORTS
December 14, 2007
This is what the New York Yankees' Jason Giambi said in a USA Today article last summer: "I was wrong for doing that stuff. What we should have done a long time ago was stand up - players, ownership, everybody - and said: 'We made a mistake.' " Giambi's candor drew the ire of Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who said, in part: "There's an implication that there was a lot of people that were involved that would know that, what was going on, and I can tell you that's false. ... Whatever goes on individually with these guys is really on them."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 15, 2007
News item: Troy Ellerman, the lawyer who leaked BALCO grand jury testimony to two Bay Area reporters, has been sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail. My take: That would be 26 months more than Victor Conte, the admitted ringleader of one of the most notorious drug scandals in the history of professional sports. In some strange parallel legal universe, I'm sure this makes perfect sense. News item: In a related development, New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi met with baseball steroids investigator George Mitchell and his staff Friday, but little was revealed publicly about the interview.
SPORTS
By BOB FORD and BOB FORD,The Philadelphia Inquirer | June 25, 2007
Jason Giambi, apparently a little slow on the uptake, has finally learned the biggest truth about baseball's continuing wrangle with the issue of steroids: Honesty will get you nowhere. What honesty got Giambi last week was a date with former Sen. George Mitchell, the leader of baseball's official investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Mitchell must be tickled about it, because 15 months into his investigation he hadn't talked to a single active player, which was making it difficult to find stuff to put between the covers of his report.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 27, 2007
With all the talking Jason Giambi has done over the years - to grand juries and to full-color newspapers and now to New York Yankees and Major League Baseball officials - you'd think by now he would have also spoken to the notorious Mitchell investigators. Or at least been put on their schedule. That, you'd think, is why the Mitchell folks exist, and this seems to be a fastball down the middle for them. But it hasn't happened yet. Which probably tells you all you need to know about the priorities of all involved.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | June 28, 2006
Does the proverbial "window" for the Orioles to play the next three games still exist when the forecast calls for rain for 40 days and 40 nights? When you read that Jason Giambi hit two more home runs, do you still wonder why most fans no longer seem to notice the stench from the steroid allegations that, not too long ago, seeped from his pores? If you're Max Baer Jr., are you more disturbed by how your father is portrayed in Cinderella Man or that people on the street still yell "Hey, Jethro" when they see you?
SPORTS
December 14, 2007
This is what the New York Yankees' Jason Giambi said in a USA Today article last summer: "I was wrong for doing that stuff. What we should have done a long time ago was stand up - players, ownership, everybody - and said: 'We made a mistake.' " Giambi's candor drew the ire of Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who said, in part: "There's an implication that there was a lot of people that were involved that would know that, what was going on, and I can tell you that's false. ... Whatever goes on individually with these guys is really on them."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
NEW YORK - Orioles reliever Willis Roberts lost his mechanics yesterday, and Jason Giambi almost lost his temper. Roberts hit Giambi in the eighth inning of Game 1 of a doubleheader at Yankee Stadium, causing plate umpire Sam Holbrook to warn both dugouts. Giambi had to rear back to avoid Roberts' first pitch that was tailing inside. The next one nailed him on the right arm, and Giambi directed a few choice words at Roberts as he walked to first base. "I was trying to throw the ball inside and down.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | April 24, 2006
NEW YORK -- It often didn't seem fair. As his counterpart, New York Yankees ace left-hander Randy Johnson, severed a slew of bats, reducing almost all of the Orioles hitters not named Miguel Tejada to a series of half-hearted swings and meekly struck ground balls, Bruce Chen had a fastball that couldn't overpower and a changeup that couldn't confuse. When Chen doesn't have command of his soft-tossing repertoire, as he hasn't for much of the season, the results can be disastrous. Yesterday was the latest case in point as the left-hander was battered for two long Jason Giambi home runs, three of the designated hitter's five RBIs, and eight other hits through four innings of the Orioles' 7-1 loss to New York in the series finale before 47,996 at Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
BOSTON -- He is the unkempt hero of the fall, the husky left-hander with the baggy pants and the partially buttoned jersey who doesn't disappoint when the leaves turn colors. For four seasons, David Wells worked that autumn magic for the New York Yankees, a team the brash and bawdy Wells seemed destined to pitch for. This September he is wearing the ill-fitting uniform of the enemy. The result, though, hasn't changed. Wells allowed three runs in seven strong innings last night to lead the Boston Red Sox to a 5-3 win against the archrival Yankees, a win that tied the two American League East superpowers atop the division with two games remaining in the regular season.
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