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By ARTHUR DAN GLECKLER | October 5, 1991
Lately I've felt as though I were seeing some ghosts of the Baltimore of the 1950s.I did not live here then; but when I arrived in 1962, I heard about them: The block-busting, the dying of churches and schools, the trashing of streets and morals, the terror and sorrow that come when neighborhoods are ripped apart and all the ''responsible'' (I think the word then was ''respectable'') people leave.The Northwood movie theater was being integrated in 1962, and people were furious over this invasion of the rights of business to select its clientele.
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NEWS
By Kayla Bawroski and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Stores are stocked with costumes and giant bags of candy in preparation for the droves of children who will go trick-or-treating at the end of the month. But hand in hand with the fun side of Halloween is the spooky side, and Harford County is not exempt from local ghost stories. Lisa Ryan opened Havre de Haunts Tours & Paranormal Research last year to investigate and share those stories. Through Havre de Haunts, Ryan offers a 1½-hour guided walking tour of Havre de Grace that includes a history of the town as well as local ghost stories, all of which are true, Ryan claims.
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SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Do you believe in ghosts? To live in Baltimore is to live in city haunted by its past. I think it's part of our lingering Southerness — the excessively sweet desserts, the annual freakouts over snow, the Faulknerian thing about the past not even being past. Lord knows how many wallets in town still have Hutzler's cards buried behind the ones for Macy's or the ATM, or how many anniversary-celebrants still try to make reservations at Haussner's. Because nothing, of course, is quite so beloved as something that's no longer around.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Ellicott City has ghosts and antiques and Shakespeare in the ruins and old timey toys and a railroad museum and good restaurants -- pretty much everything you'd want from a charming Main Street.  This week, Ellicott City is competing with other small towns in a contest sponsored by Parade .  The winning town will be featured in the magazine later this summer.  Ellicott City has beaten Ridgefield, Conn. and Rockland, Maine to advance to the semifinals.   Now it faces Collierville, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
Since its restoration was completed in 1999, roughly 100,000 people per year have flocked to the Baltimore waterfront to tour the Constellation, the last all-sail warship built by the U.S. Navy. Security at the Inner Harbor site seems tight enough to prevent anyone from sneaking aboard the old Civil War vessel without paying admission. Yet three visitors, it seems, not only never paid, they've also never left. That may sound abnormal. In fact, it's paranormal. Tomorrow beginning at 5 p.m., members of the Baltimore Society for Paranormal Research will board the Constellation in hopes of finding the stowaways: the ghosts of sailors Neil Harvey, Carl Hansen and Capt.
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los ANgeles Times | April 8, 2007
Angelica By Arthur Phillips Random House / 336 pages / $25.95 Edmund Wilson's 1934 essay "The Ambiguity of Henry James" famously put forth a Freudian-steeped argument that the apparitions in James' The Turn of the Screw were not real ghosts but figments of the sexually repressed governess' imagination. No one but the governess sees the ghosts, after all, and James himself had remarked in a preface that the apparitions "are of the order of those involved in witchcraft cases rather than of those in cases of psychic research."
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 1997
The weather is awful, the beaches are overcrowded, the hammock sags, and you're going to scream if you see one more article about UFOs or Bill Gates' billions. The expensive cure for such troubles involves whitewashed cottages, grape arbors, and Mediterranean sunsets. The cheap solution is to take a leisurely cruise through a bookstore.As you sail through the soft air-conditioned breezes of your bookstore, keep a sharp eye out for Dennis McFarland's exquisitely spooky novel "A Face at the Window" (Broadway Books, 309 pages, $25)
NEWS
By Terrence S. Kenny | May 11, 2000
SHE HOLDS on to my neck as though I were a tree rooted at the edge of a cliff, the very edge of the world, beyond which lies the shadowy realm of things that go bump in the nightmares of children. Four years old, she has been through enough to feed the night-time beasts of old men. The Howard County shelter where I work and she lives with her grandmother offers warmth and food and a place to play. She goes to a good day-care center, where she has begun to exercise the intelligence hidden behind her stammer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 13, 1994
"Oh, social convention! I often think that is what's behind all the mischief in this world." This statement -- made by Mrs. Alving, the lead character in "Ghosts" -- is at the core of Henrik Ibsen's 1881 play, which is receiving a lean, incisive and at times riveting production at Center Stage.Mrs. Alving makes this declaration against social convention after telling her pastor the truth about her sham of a marriage, in which she covered up her late husband's dissolute life.The title, "Ghosts," is often narrowly interpreted to refer solely to the venereal disease Mrs. Alving's son, Oswald, inherited from her husband.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 31, 1994
Those who decry gun control of any scope or form -- the ones who never seem to give an intellectual inch in the political battle over handguns, in particular -- are starkly silent on those rare occasions when the ghosts scream in their faces. There are ghosts in the eyes of literally millions of men, women and children whose loved ones have been killed with guns. And yet, they could all line up and tell their stories and light candles, and those who oppose gun laws would note the emotional ravings, then assert as higher principle the absolute right to bear arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Psychic powers are not required to detect the problems with "Ghost the Musical," which haunts the Hippodrome this week as part of a national tour.  For a start, it's over-produced. It seems the creators wanted to have it both ways, wanted it to be a stage show and a movie at the same time, with all sorts of cinematic elements popping up seemingly every few minutes. If you wanted to see the 1990 "Ghost," you'd put it in your Netflix queue. Another problem is that, like many a new musical ("Flashdance" screeches to mind)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Bruce Joel Rubin, who won an Academy Award for his screenplay for the 1990 hit movie "Ghost," did not feel a compelling need to revisit the work. Not long after the film's release - it went on to earn half a billion dollars worldwide - Paramount Pictures asked Rubin to write a sequel to the story of a young man named Sam who, after being murdered during a mugging, hangs around in ectoplasmic form to keep his beloved Molly from danger. Rubin resisted the studio's overtures. "I really didn't know where to take it," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014
Since moving to Charm City nine years ago, Rob Vary has been quite busy interacting with the many residents of Baltimore - living and not-so living. Vary, 32, is a tour guide for the Baltimore Ghost Tours, which coordinates three ghost tours in Mount Vernon and Fells Point. He has been working as a ghost tour guide in Baltimore for seven years, though his work with ghosts began even earlier while giving ghost tours as a college student in Gettysburg, Pa. These days, Vary works in Mount Vernon, where the neighborhood is swarming with ghosts.
NEWS
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Nick Millhiser and Alex Frankel have the uncanny ability to write songs with heavy themes and danceable grooves. "We've always liked stuff that can feel kind of fun and carefree from a production standpoint, but lyrically not have to be totally innocuous, like New Order, Depeche Mode or even LCD Soundsystem," said Millhiser over the phone last Thursday. "On the last record, the song 'Jam for Jerry' was about a really good friend of ours who passed away," he said. "The only way we could've tackled that song lyrically was with something that wasn't so melancholy, brooding or on the nose with the subject matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Nick Millhiser and Alex Frankel have the uncanny ability to write songs with heavy themes and danceable grooves. “We've always liked stuff that can feel kind of fun and carefree from a production standpoint, but lyrically not have to be totally innocuous, like New Order, Depeche Mode or even LCD Soundsystem,” said Millhiser over the phone last Thursday. “On the last record, the song 'Jam for Jerry' was about a really good friend of ours who passed away,” he said. “The only way we could've tackled that song lyrically was with something that wasn't so melancholy, brooding or on the nose with the subject matter.” The two lifelong friends make up the Brooklyn-based synthpop group Holy Ghost!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
¿¿The past nips at 72-year-old blues singer Oscar Clifton day and night, especially night, when Viola, the woman he loved and lost 20 years earlier, seems to float back into his life on beams of moonlight. On such occasions, Oscar becomes a willing partner in what might be described as a “dance of the holy ghosts” - the no-caps title of an earnest, if not entirely satisfying, work by Marcus Gardley now on the boards at Center Stage. Gardley calls this “a play on memory,” and it's partially autobiographical.
NEWS
By Robert Dominguez and Robert Dominguez,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | October 31, 2002
NEW YORK - On a rainy, windswept night In Yonkers, Dr. Fran Bennett is walking the darkened corridors of a 300- year-old mansion hunting for ghosts. It's a typical Saturday night for Bennett, a paranormal investigator and founder of the New York Ghost Chapter, who for 16 years has been documenting what she claims is evidence that spirits walk among us. Most weekends find Bennett and her small team of investigators wandering in the dark and searching for spirits in an assortment of "haunted" locales - historic houses, museums, private homes, cemeteries and even restaurants - while armed with electronic equipment that includes digital cameras, infrared video, tape recorders, motion detectors and specially designed electromagnetic field meters.
FEATURES
By Patrick McGuire and Patrick McGuire,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
Gettysburg, Pa. -- In a sun-drenched, tree-lined meadow on a corner of the battlefield here, director Ron Maxwell talked quietly of ghosts. "It all starts with ghosts," said the man who is filming "The Killer Angels," a Turner Network Television movie based on Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the three-day battle fought here in 1863.Mr. Shaara, who died four years ago, once told Mr. Maxwell that he wrote his novel because Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and James Longstreet spoke to him from the grave.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
No. 4 Stevenson not only defeated No. 12 and reigning national champion Salisbury, 12-6, in a NCAA tournament semifinal to advance to the program's first title game, but the Mustangs may also have banished some ghosts of the past. Stevenson had been escorted out of the postseason in two of the past three seasons by the Sea Gulls, who still command a 10-6 advantage in their series with their former Capital Athletic Conference foe. What made Sunday's triumph even more special is that the Mustangs had been evicted from the Final Four in 2010 and 2012 by Salisbury, a program that has captured 10 national titles.
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | January 23, 2013
Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Baltimore-born Thurgood Marshall, the civil rights lawyer and first black Supreme Court justice who was instrumental in ending Jim Crow segregation. His representation of schoolgirl Linda Brown resulted in the landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which ended separation practiced in a wide variety of public facilities and institutions. Yet Marshall sought more than just desegregation. Explaining his vision, Marshall proclaimed that "a child born to a black mother in a state like Mississippi … has exactly the same rights as a white baby born to the wealthiest person in the United States.
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