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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
The moon played hide-and-seek above the eerie shadows cast by drifting clouds. Black Aggie's eyes, deep-set under her cowl, glowed hot and red; her spectral hand beckoned the cowering figures. Most fled, screaming. But others, more daring, remained -- and died in her icy embrace.Or so legend has it.Chains rattled and shrieks rent the air on the wooded hilltop near Reisterstown. A shadowy figure swayed in the moonlight. John Berry, hanged for murder in 1752 and left to rot, was bemoaning his fate.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 13, 2012
Vernon Loeb, the Washington Post editor who worked with Paula Broadwell on the bio of David Petraeus, says he was blind-sided by the affair that ended Petraeus' stint as CIA director. "My wife says I'm the most clueless person in America," he begins in a first-person piece in the Post, describing his involvement in the book "All In. " Loeb says he got involved after a call from his agent about collaborating on a book about Petraeus' leadership. Loeb was a logical choice -- he had embedded with a division under the general's command in 2003, while covering the Pentagon.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | September 12, 1990
Actors tend to dream simultaneously in different directions.On the one hand, there is the burning desire to play the ultimate role in their all-time favorite show; to go onstage before a large house and speak lines and sing songs memorized long before, in the private rehearsals of childhood.But the companion dream is animated by the thrill of innovation; the unearthing of new plays, playwrights and theatrical techniques. The bright lights of Broadway may beckon to all committed Thespians, but the experimental electricity of the off-Broadway production is nothing to sneeze at.Which explains what the Annapolis Theater Project (ATP)
NEWS
November 5, 2011
It is unfortunate that David Dunmeyer, in his role as a Queen Anne's County Commissioner, has chosen to be the shrill mouthpiece of the no-growth movement in Queen Anne's County ("Sprawl is the real enemy of rural living," Nov. 2). Perhaps Commissioner Dunmeyer is unaware that he lives in one of the developments he so richly decries as an enemy of rural living. Perhaps he is also unaware that, as a homebuilder himself, he is responsible, either directly or indirectly, for the development of open spaces in the state of Maryland.
NEWS
November 5, 2011
It is unfortunate that David Dunmeyer, in his role as a Queen Anne's County Commissioner, has chosen to be the shrill mouthpiece of the no-growth movement in Queen Anne's County ("Sprawl is the real enemy of rural living," Nov. 2). Perhaps Commissioner Dunmeyer is unaware that he lives in one of the developments he so richly decries as an enemy of rural living. Perhaps he is also unaware that, as a homebuilder himself, he is responsible, either directly or indirectly, for the development of open spaces in the state of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 13, 2012
Vernon Loeb, the Washington Post editor who worked with Paula Broadwell on the bio of David Petraeus, says he was blind-sided by the affair that ended Petraeus' stint as CIA director. "My wife says I'm the most clueless person in America," he begins in a first-person piece in the Post, describing his involvement in the book "All In. " Loeb says he got involved after a call from his agent about collaborating on a book about Petraeus' leadership. Loeb was a logical choice -- he had embedded with a division under the general's command in 2003, while covering the Pentagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | November 18, 2001
Go searching for Anne Tyler, Baltimore's Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, and this is what you'll find: a recipe for a spicy Chinese dish called Mapo Dofu that feeds six. A schematic diagram of the interior of a fictitious boardinghouse. A log of the weather. You will learn that it rained overnight in Baltimore on Sept. 23, 1993. But you won't learn it easily. The woman who explores the bittersweet victories and defeats of domestic life in such novels as The Accidental Tourist, Breathing Lessons and Back When We Were Grownups hasn't granted an interview about her own domestic life since 1977.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | May 13, 1992
IT IS ONE of the great oddities of pop culture.The official White House photo of Richard Nixon shaking hands with Elvis Presley in 1970 remains the most requested picture from the archives of the Library of Congress, a postcard from the outer vestibule of weird.It shows the business-suited Nixon, a tight smile wired across his face, gripping palms with a bleary-eyed King of Rock and Roll, the high-collar of Presley's shirt lapping over a black jacket draped across his shoulders, a gold belt buckle above his fabled TC pelvis gleaming like a giant waffle.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 26, 1999
James M. Kilby knows what it's like to stare racism in the face. He was one of 22 black students to integrate Warren County High School in Warren County, Va., in 1959.Kilby, a former Crofton resident, remembers a shouting "gauntlet" of white people in his account of that day in his 55-page autobiography, "The Forever Fight: Turn Everyone Against Racism," which he published himself. It was produced with the help of a ghost writer through the vanity press Dorrance Publishing.Kilby will be signing copies of the paperbound volume from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday at Walden Books in Annapolis Mall.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 6, 2008
Claude Lelouch created a blockbuster heavy-date film 42 years ago with A Man and a Woman. He crafts a light, enigmatically seductive mystery with Roman de Gare. By far the most purely entertaining of all his films to reach these shores, Roman de Gare is the rare trick film in which all the tricks reveal something amusing, involving or poignant about its characters. Fanny Ardant, managing to combine the assurance of a fashionable lady with the allure of a femme fatale, plays a popular novelist whose sudden leap in artistry may be due to the efforts of a ghost writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | November 18, 2001
Go searching for Anne Tyler, Baltimore's Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, and this is what you'll find: a recipe for a spicy Chinese dish called Mapo Dofu that feeds six. A schematic diagram of the interior of a fictitious boardinghouse. A log of the weather. You will learn that it rained overnight in Baltimore on Sept. 23, 1993. But you won't learn it easily. The woman who explores the bittersweet victories and defeats of domestic life in such novels as The Accidental Tourist, Breathing Lessons and Back When We Were Grownups hasn't granted an interview about her own domestic life since 1977.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
The moon played hide-and-seek above the eerie shadows cast by drifting clouds. Black Aggie's eyes, deep-set under her cowl, glowed hot and red; her spectral hand beckoned the cowering figures. Most fled, screaming. But others, more daring, remained -- and died in her icy embrace.Or so legend has it.Chains rattled and shrieks rent the air on the wooded hilltop near Reisterstown. A shadowy figure swayed in the moonlight. John Berry, hanged for murder in 1752 and left to rot, was bemoaning his fate.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | September 12, 1990
Actors tend to dream simultaneously in different directions.On the one hand, there is the burning desire to play the ultimate role in their all-time favorite show; to go onstage before a large house and speak lines and sing songs memorized long before, in the private rehearsals of childhood.But the companion dream is animated by the thrill of innovation; the unearthing of new plays, playwrights and theatrical techniques. The bright lights of Broadway may beckon to all committed Thespians, but the experimental electricity of the off-Broadway production is nothing to sneeze at.Which explains what the Annapolis Theater Project (ATP)
NEWS
April 14, 2010
Dave Hyde of the Sun Sentinel suggests that Ben Roethlisberger will be sufficiently punished for being an idiot by being "publicly shamed." That might be true if he were indeed to be publicly shamed, but this country does not "do" shame. At worst, Mr. Roethlisberger will be embarrassed, perhaps deeply embarrassed, but not shamed. Shame is the opposite of honor, and if Ben had any honor he would not have been in this situation in the first place. Since he clearly has no honor, he also has no shame.
NEWS
October 17, 1992
In 1988, Stanford University scrapped its required course in Western Civilization in favor of Culture, Ideas, Values. Dante's "Inferno" was out. "I, Rigoberta Menchu, an Indian Woman in Guatemala" was in.Like other so-called autobiographies by famous people, Rigoberta Menchu did not write hers unassisted. A French radical feminist author, Elizabeth Burgos-Debray, may be credited as Rigoberta Menchu's discoverer and ghost. Some conservative critics detect in "I, Rigoberta" the political correctness of its ghost-writer more than the eloquence of its subject.
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