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Ghost Stories

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
Just in time for Halloween is Ed Okonowicz's latest ghostly work, "The Big Book of Maryland Ghost Stories," recently published by Stackpole Books. Since 1994, Okonowicz, who lives in Elkton, has written more than 20 books devoted to the macabre, apparitions and other weird, unexplained sightings that have haunted the Free State and nearby Delaware and its weak-kneed citizenry (especially this time of the year) since Colonial days. "It's a thick one, and I'd say there is 70 percent new stuff in it with the remainder being stories I found in old books, newspapers, historic documents or stories from earlier books of mine that are now out of print," said Okonowicz, who celebrated his 63rd birthday Halloween Eve, in a telephone interview the other day. "I think after all these years, I'm about ghosted out," he said with a laugh.
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NEWS
By Kayla Bawroski and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Stores are stocked with costumes and giant bags of candy in preparation for the droves of children who will go trick-or-treating at the end of the month. But hand in hand with the fun side of Halloween is the spooky side, and Harford County is not exempt from local ghost stories. Lisa Ryan opened Havre de Haunts Tours & Paranormal Research last year to investigate and share those stories. Through Havre de Haunts, Ryan offers a 1½-hour guided walking tour of Havre de Grace that includes a history of the town as well as local ghost stories, all of which are true, Ryan claims.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik | October 8, 2006
Each Sunday, throughout the HBO drama's 13-week season, TV critic David Zurawik will highlight a must-see character or story element appearing in the current episode. Leave it to HBO's The Wire to take six kids sitting in an alley talking about zombies and somehow turn it into a moment of keen insight into childhood, imagination and the power of myth. The Wire airs at 10 tonight on HBO.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
For those in search of a calmer beach experience, nearby Assateague National Island Seashore can be a good alternative to Ocean City. And there's another perk to this great park- you can have bonfires on the beach. There is no better way to unwind than to sit around a fire with friends, eating s’mores, and looking up at the stars - which are easier to see at the park, miles away from civilization. It’s something I’ve done regularly for many years. If you’re going to have a fire on the beach, you'll need to pay an entry fee to get into the park.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
For those in search of a calmer beach experience, nearby Assateague National Island Seashore can be a good alternative to Ocean City. And there's another perk to this great park- you can have bonfires on the beach. There is no better way to unwind than to sit around a fire with friends, eating s’mores, and looking up at the stars - which are easier to see at the park, miles away from civilization. It’s something I’ve done regularly for many years. If you’re going to have a fire on the beach, you'll need to pay an entry fee to get into the park.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
The moon played hide-and-seek above the eerie shadows cast by drifting clouds. Black Aggie's eyes, deep-set under her cowl, glowed hot and red; her spectral hand beckoned the cowering figures. Most fled, screaming. But others, more daring, remained -- and died in her icy embrace.Or so legend has it.Chains rattled and shrieks rent the air on the wooded hilltop near Reisterstown. A shadowy figure swayed in the moonlight. John Berry, hanged for murder in 1752 and left to rot, was bemoaning his fate.
NEWS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2003
For two men who spend a lot of time in cemeteries, Ed Okonowicz and Mike Dixon are surprisingly cheerful. They have reason to be: Okonowicz, a master storyteller, and Dixon, a historian, joined forces five years ago to lead what have become nationally known ghost walks and graveyard tours throughout the Delmarva Peninsula. Their often-sold out walks are based on a combination of genealogical and historical research by Dixon, and local ghost stories and folklore that Okonowicz has chronicled over a 20-year period.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 2, 2007
Ed Okonowicz has a knack for mixing history with its ghosts. On a recent afternoon he demonstrated his storytelling technique with a yarn about the Jericho Covered Bridge. He began with facts: The bridge was built in the 1800s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Then he sprinkled in some hair-raising legends. In one account, people claimed they saw slaves hanging from the bridge; in another, some said their cars inexplicably stalled on the bridge. "My stories are 50 percent history and 50 percent ghost stories," said Okonowicz, a 59-year-old Elkton resident.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 2, 2007
Ed Okonowicz has a knack for mixing history with its ghosts. On a recent afternoon, he demonstrated his storytelling technique with a yarn about the Jericho Covered Bridge. He began with facts: The bridge was built in the 1800s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Then he sprinkled in some hair-raising legends. In one account, people claimed they saw slaves hanging from the bridge's rafters; in another, some said their cars inexplicably stalled on the bridge. "My stories are 50 percent history and 50 percent ghost stories," said Okonowicz, a 59-year-old Elkton resident.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
It's the swinging-corpse stories that Ed Okonowicz likes best. The creepy, hair-raising tales with nuggets of truth behind them get Okonowicz, such as the one about the sea captain who vowed never to spend eternity with his feet touching the earth. When the captain died in 1827, his shipmates pickled him in rum. He rests, suspended from a marble grave top in the Spesutia Cemetery at St. George's Episcopal Church in Perryman. Good old-fashioned ghost stories tickle Okonowicz, too. Take the one about the girl in the sequined dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A pub crawl is simple: Gather some friends, hit some bars and stumble your separate ways home. While fun, the routine can get a little repetitive. That's why, in the past couple years, a number of off-beat bar crawls have sprung up. Now, you and a gang of friends or family can pedal from pub to pub on a custom-made 16-person bicycle, or learn about the haunted bars of Ellicott City — and then hoist a pint inside. You can even cover yourself in fake blood and makeup, and shuffle like a zombie down Harford Road.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | October 3, 2011
When most people think of Halloween, images of pumpkins, witches and ghosts usually come to mind. Whether you like to be scared senseless in a haunted house, learn more about true ghost stories or prefer a simple hayride on the farm to pick out pumpkins, there is plenty of fun to be had in Harford County this fall for all ages. For the scariest Halloween fun, be sure to check out Legends of the Fog - Harford County's largest haunted attraction. Located on about 80 acres of Aldino Sod Farm in Aberdeen, Legends of the Fog is open on weekends in October through the first weekend in November.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
Just in time for Halloween is Ed Okonowicz's latest ghostly work, "The Big Book of Maryland Ghost Stories," recently published by Stackpole Books. Since 1994, Okonowicz, who lives in Elkton, has written more than 20 books devoted to the macabre, apparitions and other weird, unexplained sightings that have haunted the Free State and nearby Delaware and its weak-kneed citizenry (especially this time of the year) since Colonial days. "It's a thick one, and I'd say there is 70 percent new stuff in it with the remainder being stories I found in old books, newspapers, historic documents or stories from earlier books of mine that are now out of print," said Okonowicz, who celebrated his 63rd birthday Halloween Eve, in a telephone interview the other day. "I think after all these years, I'm about ghosted out," he said with a laugh.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | October 27, 2007
"In terms of important historical associations with ghost stories and a grisly past, Point Lookout Lighthouse in St. Mary's County is right up there. It's five stars out of five stars," says Ed Okonowicz. The Cecil County author and semiretired college professor is Maryland's premier collector of ghost stories, regional folklore and supernatural tales. The lighthouse Okonowicz is talking about stands at the tip of St. Mary's County, where Potomac River waters swirl and mix with those of tidal Chesapeake Bay. The 530-acre site, including the lighthouse, has been a state park since 1962.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 2, 2007
Ed Okonowicz has a knack for mixing history with its ghosts. On a recent afternoon, he demonstrated his storytelling technique with a yarn about the Jericho Covered Bridge. He began with facts: The bridge was built in the 1800s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Then he sprinkled in some hair-raising legends. In one account, people claimed they saw slaves hanging from the bridge's rafters; in another, some said their cars inexplicably stalled on the bridge. "My stories are 50 percent history and 50 percent ghost stories," said Okonowicz, a 59-year-old Elkton resident.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 2, 2007
Ed Okonowicz has a knack for mixing history with its ghosts. On a recent afternoon he demonstrated his storytelling technique with a yarn about the Jericho Covered Bridge. He began with facts: The bridge was built in the 1800s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Then he sprinkled in some hair-raising legends. In one account, people claimed they saw slaves hanging from the bridge; in another, some said their cars inexplicably stalled on the bridge. "My stories are 50 percent history and 50 percent ghost stories," said Okonowicz, a 59-year-old Elkton resident.
FEATURES
By Retold by Jan Gleiter and Kathleen Thompson | October 7, 1998
Editor's note: In this retelling of the Washington Irving classic, schoolteacher Ichabod Crane encounters a ghostly vision as he returns from a late-night party.So Ichabod rode Gunpowder to the party. Brom Bones came, too, on his fine black horse, Daredevil.Ichabod danced every dance with Katrina because he was such a good dancer. Brom Bones sat in a corner by himself.When the dancing ended, people started telling stories - ghost stories. Ichabod listened to them all. And Ichabod believed them.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | October 30, 1994
Who believes in ghosts?"Everybody does," says Brad Leithauser, editor of "The Norton Book of Ghost Stories."Whether you agree or disagree with him, you don't want to miss his anthology of short stories guaranteed to send chills up and down your spine.It's one of many books on the market today guaranteed to raise the hairs on the back on your neck and make you look cautiously over your shoulder.Of course, there are the old favorites: Bram Stoker's "Dracula," Stephen King's "Salem's Lot" and Anne Rice's "Interview with the Vampire," plus scores of true-life accounts.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | October 8, 2006
Each Sunday, throughout the HBO drama's 13-week season, TV critic David Zurawik will highlight a must-see character or story element appearing in the current episode. Leave it to HBO's The Wire to take six kids sitting in an alley talking about zombies and somehow turn it into a moment of keen insight into childhood, imagination and the power of myth. The Wire airs at 10 tonight on HBO.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
It's the swinging-corpse stories that Ed Okonowicz likes best. The creepy, hair-raising tales with nuggets of truth behind them get Okonowicz, such as the one about the sea captain who vowed never to spend eternity with his feet touching the earth. When the captain died in 1827, his shipmates pickled him in rum. He rests, suspended from a marble grave top in the Spesutia Cemetery at St. George's Episcopal Church in Perryman. Good old-fashioned ghost stories tickle Okonowicz, too. Take the one about the girl in the sequined dress.
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