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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emir Salihovic and Emir Salihovic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 2000
Drive along College Avenue in Ellicott City at midnight and strange things happen, says a folk tale from this 250-year-old town. Actually, in the folk tale, this road is called by its old nickname, Seven Hills Road. If you drive it fast, it can feel like a roller-coaster, going up and down exactly seven times. And if you do that precisely at midnight and look into your rear-view mirror just as you hit the top of the seventh hill, it's said that you will see a spooky figure of a horseman, a ghost who supposedly haunts the road near the place he was killed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Rie Sadler and Jim Jones set out to look for ghosts. Instead, they found each other. "Clearly, we were destined — or doomed — to be together," says Sadler, 37, a project analyst for an Annapolis-based defense contractor. Her fiancé, a 47-year-old Baltimore County law enforcement officer, nods approvingly and smiles. "We just kind of melded together," he explains. Paranormal investigators by avocation — go ahead, call them ghostbusters; they don't mind — Sadler and Jones are two of dozens of people in the Baltimore area who spend their leisure hours collecting evidence of spirits.
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NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
Jacqueline Galke has heard the story before. A young student who died of pneumonia at Patapsco Female Institute before her parents could reach her wanders the grounds of the former 19th-century school. Nervous teens hang out there in hopes of a sighting. Ghost hunters stop by snapping random photographs. "We realize people think that it's a haunted site," said Galke, executive director of the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Do we care? No. It's been considered a haunted site at least for the last 25 years."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
Leanna Foglia believes in ghosts. She says she feels their presence often. That's why she's perfect for this gig. On a recent drizzly night in Fells Point, Foglia, 35, wearing a campy black outfit and black eyeliner that she describes as a "pirate-y Goth-girl look," leads a small group on the 7 p.m. Baltimore Ghost Tour. She's hoping to scare up a few spirits as the tour spends the next 75 minutes traipsing around various landmarks where ghost-sightings have been reported. But first she goes over the ground rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- As dusk falls on the Triangular Field, where scores of Confederate and Union soldiers lay dead and dying on July 2, 1863, author Mark Nesbitt stands with a digital voice recorder and recites a series of questions. We hear no response this Thursday evening. But when we turn the Panasonic RR-QR60 to playback, it appears that we had had a visitor. "Thomas Lewis Ware," Nesbitt's voice says, "Are you here with us?" What sounds like a gruff, short bark of "Yes" comes from the recorder.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
As a professional ghost hunter and researcher, Rick Fisher isn't particularly interested in convincing skeptics that spirits exist.Perhaps it is because he has seen or heard ghosts so many times: the dancing, translucent orbs that appear in photographs after his camera film is developed; the fog-like puffs of ectoplasm that behave similarly; the human voices that show up on an audiotape that recorded only silence.But Fisher and the other Pennsylvania Ghost Hunters Society members, who traveled to Ellicott City yesterday to investigate supposedly haunted sites, think they know the truth.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
NEWS
By Gerry Smith and Gerry Smith,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 24, 2007
Matthew Goetz wasn't surprised when he saw a photograph capturing a mysterious light at the Cobblestone Road Saloon. After all, Goetz, owner of the 148-year-old tavern in West Chicago, claims to have witnessed shadowy figures there a dozen times. "Maybe I'm nuts," he said, "but I've seen some things I can't explain." About one-third of Americans believe in ghosts and haunted houses, according to a 2005 Gallup poll. Such findings underscore the spiritual attraction to probing the unknown, said Jeff Belanger, who maintains the popular Web site Ghostvillage.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
NATIONAL Intelligence shortcomings noted America doesn't have the luxury of time to remedy the severe shortcomings in intelligence that allowed terrorists to be launch devastating attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, the 9/11 commission concluded in its report yesterday. [Page 1a] Halliburton defends itself Halliburton executives, fending off federal inquiries and charges of profiteering in Iraq, defended themselves on Capitol Hill at a contentious hearing. They were confronted by some of their employees, alleging waste and incompetence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Rie Sadler and Jim Jones set out to look for ghosts. Instead, they found each other. "Clearly, we were destined — or doomed — to be together," says Sadler, 37, a project analyst for an Annapolis-based defense contractor. Her fiancé, a 47-year-old Baltimore County law enforcement officer, nods approvingly and smiles. "We just kind of melded together," he explains. Paranormal investigators by avocation — go ahead, call them ghostbusters; they don't mind — Sadler and Jones are two of dozens of people in the Baltimore area who spend their leisure hours collecting evidence of spirits.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2007
STATE COLLEGE, PA. -- Fledgling ghost-hunters step expectantly into the darkened theater. It's nearing midnight, the campus is otherwise deserted, and an autumnal breeze rustles the drying elms. Moody. Just the way they like it. With hope in their hearts and fresh batteries in their electromagnetic field detectors, they've come searching for signs, for evidence, for validation. They pad carefully along the carpeted aisles of Penn State's century-old Schwab Auditorium, which, word has it, is haunted by as many as four spirits.
NEWS
By Gerry Smith and Gerry Smith,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 24, 2007
Matthew Goetz wasn't surprised when he saw a photograph capturing a mysterious light at the Cobblestone Road Saloon. After all, Goetz, owner of the 148-year-old tavern in West Chicago, claims to have witnessed shadowy figures there a dozen times. "Maybe I'm nuts," he said, "but I've seen some things I can't explain." About one-third of Americans believe in ghosts and haunted houses, according to a 2005 Gallup poll. Such findings underscore the spiritual attraction to probing the unknown, said Jeff Belanger, who maintains the popular Web site Ghostvillage.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
The Patapsco Female Institute hosts Shakespeare performances in the summer. School children sift through layers of dirt in search of broken china, utensils and other artifacts at an active archaeological dig on the premises. It's been in Ellicott City for almost a decade -- but many hear the name and assume the park is a prison or an insane asylum. "It's amazing how many people don't know we're here," said Jacquelyn Galke, executive director of the Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute, a booster group.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
NATIONAL Intelligence shortcomings noted America doesn't have the luxury of time to remedy the severe shortcomings in intelligence that allowed terrorists to be launch devastating attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, the 9/11 commission concluded in its report yesterday. [Page 1a] Halliburton defends itself Halliburton executives, fending off federal inquiries and charges of profiteering in Iraq, defended themselves on Capitol Hill at a contentious hearing. They were confronted by some of their employees, alleging waste and incompetence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- As dusk falls on the Triangular Field, where scores of Confederate and Union soldiers lay dead and dying on July 2, 1863, author Mark Nesbitt stands with a digital voice recorder and recites a series of questions. We hear no response this Thursday evening. But when we turn the Panasonic RR-QR60 to playback, it appears that we had had a visitor. "Thomas Lewis Ware," Nesbitt's voice says, "Are you here with us?" What sounds like a gruff, short bark of "Yes" comes from the recorder.
NEWS
By TOM CHAFFIN | December 8, 1996
ONE SPLENDID Sunday afternoon not long ago, I found myself trudging through chest-deep waters off the northwestern coast of Cuba - arms raised, with camera, pen and note-pad in hand. As I negotiated a path along a long, thin sandbar, my eyes remained fixed on a postage-stamp island about 200 yards offshore; a small obelisk rose from its center.I had come to the quiet fishing village of El Morrillo to see where, a century and a half earlier, a military adventurer named Narciso Lopez came ashore with a clandestine army of hireling soldiers from the United States - a "yanqui" invasion of Cuba, more than 100 years before the 1961 Bay of Pigs disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
Leanna Foglia believes in ghosts. She says she feels their presence often. That's why she's perfect for this gig. On a recent drizzly night in Fells Point, Foglia, 35, wearing a campy black outfit and black eyeliner that she describes as a "pirate-y Goth-girl look," leads a small group on the 7 p.m. Baltimore Ghost Tour. She's hoping to scare up a few spirits as the tour spends the next 75 minutes traipsing around various landmarks where ghost-sightings have been reported. But first she goes over the ground rules.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
Jacqueline Galke has heard the story before. A young student who died of pneumonia at Patapsco Female Institute before her parents could reach her wanders the grounds of the former 19th-century school. Nervous teens hang out there in hopes of a sighting. Ghost hunters stop by snapping random photographs. "We realize people think that it's a haunted site," said Galke, executive director of the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Do we care? No. It's been considered a haunted site at least for the last 25 years."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emir Salihovic and Emir Salihovic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 2000
Drive along College Avenue in Ellicott City at midnight and strange things happen, says a folk tale from this 250-year-old town. Actually, in the folk tale, this road is called by its old nickname, Seven Hills Road. If you drive it fast, it can feel like a roller-coaster, going up and down exactly seven times. And if you do that precisely at midnight and look into your rear-view mirror just as you hit the top of the seventh hill, it's said that you will see a spooky figure of a horseman, a ghost who supposedly haunts the road near the place he was killed.
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